There’s Something About Davis, Canfield, Goudy, Robeson, Carter etc.. (Revisited)

©Renee 2014

https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2013/05/02/chasing-goodies-sandoz-canadians-hubbard-and-mind-expanding-stories/

Next:

Canfield Family Genealogy Forum (Page 3)
Re: canfield casino / saratoga springs – Genevieve Hannon 7/18/04 … Re: Family of Moses Canfield & Sarah Masters – Marian Jordan 10/07/02 …

genforum.genealogy.com/canfield/page3.html

*NOTE* Link above no longer working*

  • T. Cullen Davis – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Thomas Cullen Davis (born September 22, 1933 in Fort Worth, Texas) is an American oil heir. He was arrested for, and later acquitted of, the murders of his …

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T._Cullen_Davis

    • A Texas Oil Dynasty: The Family Tree of Cullen Davis
      Karen Master became Cullen Davis’s third wife on 5 June 1979 in Fort Worth.26 Because of name similarity, some thought that the third Mrs. Davis is a sister to …

      http://www.genealogymagazine.com/cullendavis.html

      • William S. Davis, a shipping clerk for a steel mill, was born in May of 1868 in Pennsylvania, and rented a home at 121 Maple Avenue, in Johnstown. Wife Cora, also born in May of 1868 in Pennsylvania, was the mother of five children, all living, at the time of the 1900 U. S. Census. They were Edith, born November, 1883; Florence, born November, 1890; Herbert, born August, 1892; Mary, born April, 1894; and Kenneth, born in November, 1895. William S. and Cora had been married twelve years, which places the year of their marriage as 1888.5 The couple wedded on 6 November of that year in Cambria County. The marriage license shows William S. Davis, a weigh master living in Sheridan, was the son of William P. Davis and wife Hettie L. The bride, Cora B. Hoover, of Coopersdale, was the daughter of Jacob Hoover and wife Cornelia.6

        Based on the 1900 Census, Cora Hoover’s twelfth birthday fell shortly before the official date of the 1880 federal enumeration. Living in Coopersdale, Cambria County, that year was Jacob Hoover, age fifty-one, a heater in an iron rolling mill, his forty-four year-old wife, Cornelia, and six children: John, age twenty-six, a heater helper in an iron mill; James, who was unable to work due to organic heart disease; Kate, age seventeen and at home; Moyer William, age fourteen, a cart driver; Carra, age twelve, and George, age nine, both at home. Jacob Hoover’s thirty-two year-old sister-in-law, Mary Goudy, also lived with the family. Pennsylvania is given for the birthplace of each resident of the Hoover family.7

        A decade earlier, Jacob Hoover, age forty-one, a heater, held real estate valued at $2,000 and personal possessions valued at $2,100. Wife, Cornelia, age thirty-four, lived in Coopersdale with six children: John, age sixteen; Margaret, age thirteen; James, age ten; Kate, age seven; William, age five; and Cara, age two. All were Pennsylvania natives, including a twenty-eight year-old domestic servant named Mary Canachy.8

        James L. Hoover, son of Jacob, was born in Coopersdale on 10 October 1860. In an interview in 1896, he stated that the Hoovers were of German descent, and that his father was born in Bedford County, Pennsylvania, in 1832. However, both the 1870 and 1880 census schedules indicate he was born ca. 1829. Jacob Hoover, said his son, left Bedford County early in life and came to Cambria County to accept the position of manager of the general store of the Cambria Furnace Company. When the company discontinued business, Jacob worked for several years as a heater for at the Cambria Ironworks. Eventually, he relocated to New Castle, in Lawrence County. Cornelia’s maiden name is given as Goudy,9 which agrees with the 1880 census listing a Goudy sister-in-law in Jacob Hoover’s household.

        William S. and Cora (Hoover) Davis had been married six months on 31 May 1889, the day of the tragic Johnstown Flood, which claimed the lives of at least 2,200 people.10 “They moved to Braddock before the flood,” says the couple’s grandson, Cullen Davis. “My understanding is that they were not in Johnstown when the dam broke.” Davis believes his paternal grandfather’s full name was William Seldon Davis.11

        Kenneth William Davis — Cullen Davis’s father — was born on 25 November 1895 in Morrellville, Pennsylvania. For a man destined to become an oil mogul, he was born in the right place. “The petroleum industry traces its origins to Titusville, a two mile drive up the road,” notes journalist and author Mike Cochran.12 Ken Davis, whose educational background did not extend beyond the sixth grade, found his way to Texas as a World War I pilot.13 It was in Fort Worth that he met and married Alice Bound in 1921.14 After the war, Davis worked in Pennsylvania steel mills and later as a real estate agent. His role in the oil business began as a laborer in a field supply store. When the Davises returned to Fort Worth in 1929, Mr. Davis rose to position of vice president of Mid-Continent Supply Company. Within a year he gained controlling interest in the company and eventually transformed it into an industrial empire.15 Alice Bound Davis died on 27 February 1967 in Fort Worth. Her husband outlived her by only a year and a half, dying on 29 August 1968, also in Forth Worth. By the time of Ken Davis’s death, the stunning financial success known as Kendavis Industries International, Inc., was an $800 million conglomerate.16 Mr. Davis, a director of the First National Bank of Fort Worth, contributed funds for the Noble Planetarium at the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History, among other gifts.17

        Thomas Cullen Davis, son of Kenneth Davis and Alice Mae Bound, was born in Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Texas, on 22 September 1933.18 His first marriage was to Sandra Masters on 29 August 1962 in Tarrant County.19

        Priscilla Lee (Childers) Baker Wilborn became Cullen Davis’s second wife within hours of his father’s death in August, 1968.20 Born Priscilla Lee Childers in Dublin, Erath County, Texas, on 30 July 1941, she was the daughter of Oklahoma native Richard Clifford Childers, who worked in the oil industry, and his wife, the former Audie Lee Smith, a Texan.21 Priscilla’s first marriage to Jasper Baker, in Galena Park, near Houston, produced a daughter, but the couple’s union soon ended in divorce.22 In 1959, she married Jack Wilborn in Houston, Harris County. A car dealer who had served in the U.S. Navy during World War II, Wilborn was born on 16 March 1921 in Okmulgee, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The Wilborns had a son and a daughter and later divorced. He died in May 2005 in Euless, Tarrant County.23

        Described as a “human fireworks show,” Priscilla Davis was as flamboyant as her husband was reserved. The mismatched couple’s marriage ended in a lengthy, bitter separation. But in the midst of that prolonged divorce case came one of the most shocking crimes in Fort Worth’s history.

        snip~

        I read years ago that T. Cullen Davis moved far away and joined an alternate religion. He mentioned her name but I forgot it…hummm did she maybe join SUBUD ? I cannot find a trace of her anywhere…

        http://www.genealogymagazine.com/cullendavis.html

        Davis maternal family tree:

        http://www.genealogymagazine.com/deofjobo.html

        **NOTE**

        Cornelia’s maiden name is given as Goudy,9 which agrees with the 1880 census listing a Goudy sister-in-law in Jacob Hoover’s household.
        NOTE**

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clive_Davis

        GRAHAM/DAVIS:

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gray_Davis

        My old work on these connections here:

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