Pop

©Renee 2013

Yes, everyone loves a cold can or bottle to cool and refresh on a hot, summer day. Nothing like it on a boat, in a cooler or a picnic in the park, so let’s look a bit at pop. We will start with my favorite.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A%26W_Root_Beer

A&W Root Beer is a brand of root beer primarily available in the United States and Canada, that was started in 1919 by Roy Allen. In 1922, Allen partnered with Frank Wright. They combined their initials to create the brand “A&W” and inspired a restaurant chain which was founded in 1922. The first A&W root beer drinks were sold for five cents. A&W Root Beer is often referred to as the root beer standard amongst root beer reviewers.

Outside Canada, the rights to the A&W brand are owned by Dr Pepper Snapple Group, which in turn licenses the brand to the similarly named U.S.-based restaurant chain; A&W products are distributed via various U.S. bottlers. A&W Food Services of Canada, which is independent of both DPSG and the U.S. chain, is responsible for both the restaurants and the marketing of root beer products in that country, with retail products being bottled and distributed by The Coca-Cola Company.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Root_beer

Root beer is a carbonated, sweetened beverage, originally made using the root of a sassafras plant (or the bark of a sassafras tree) as the primary flavor. Root beer, popularized in North America, comes in two forms: alcoholic and soft drink. The historical root beer was analogous to small beer in that the process provided a drink with a very low alcohol content. Although roots are used as the source of many soft drinks throughout the world, often different names are used.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sassafras

Sassafras is a genus of three extant and one extinct species of deciduous trees in the family Lauraceae, native to eastern North America and eastern Asia.

S. albidum is a host plant for the spicebush swallowtail.

Steam distillation of dried root bark produces an essential oil consisting mostly of safrole, which once was extensively used as a fragrance in perfumes and soaps, food and for aromatherapy. Sassafras extract was a primary ingredient in root beer. Commercial “sassafras oil” generally is a byproduct of camphor production in Asia or comes from related trees in Brazil. Safrole is a precursor for the clandestine manufacture of the drug MDMA (ecstasy), as well as the drug MDA (3-4 methylenedioxyamphetamine) and as such, its transport is monitored internationally.

Culinary uses

The roots of sassafras can be steeped to make tea, and were used in the flavoring of traditional root beer until being banned for mass production by the FDA. Laboratory animals that were given oral doses of sassafras tea or sassafras oil that contained large doses of safrole developed permanent liver damage or various types of cancer. In humans, liver damage can take years to develop and it may not have obvious signs. Along with commercially available sarsaparilla, sassafras remains an ingredient in use among hobby or microbrew enthusiasts.

In 1960, the FDA banned the use of sassafras oil and safrole in commercially mass-produced foods and drugs based on the animal studies and human case reports. Several years later, sassafras tea was banned, a ban that lasted until the passage of the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act in 1994. Sassafras root extracts which do not contain safrole or in which the safrole has been removed are permissible, and are still widely used commercially in teas and root beers.

Sassafras tea can also be used as an anticoagulant.

Filé powder, also called gumbo filé, for its use in making gumbo, is a spicy herb made from the dried and ground leaves of the sassafras tree. It was traditionally used by Native Americans in the South, and was adopted into Creole cuisine in Louisiana.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hires_Root_Beer

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avery_Dennison

Another ROOT Beer. They also feature an orange soda, brown ale, birch beer and ginger ale.http://blog.gourmetrootbeer.com/2012/05/averys-root-beer/

Avery’s Gold Coin beverages. Avery’s Bottling Works New Britain, Conn. 06052

Now we look at that city:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Britain,_Connecticut

New Britain was settled in 1687 and then was incorporated as a new parish under the name New Britain Society in 1754. Chartered in 1850 as a township and in 1871 as a city, New Britain was separated from the nearby town of Berlin, Connecticut. A consolidation charter was adopted in 1905.

New Britain’s motto, “Industria implet alveare et melle fruitur” translated from latin, “Industry fills the hive and enjoys the honey,” is a phrase coined by Elihu Burritt, a prominent New Britain resident, diplomat, philanthropist and social activist.

During the early part of the 20th century, New Britain was known as the “Hardware Capital of the World”, as well as “Hardware City”. Major manufacturers, such as The Stanley Works, the P&F Corbin Company (later Corbin Locks), and North & Judd, were headquartered in the city.

Postcard: West Main Street, pre-1907.

In 1843 Frederick Trent Stanley established Stanley’s Bolt Manufactory in New Britain to make door bolts and other wrought-iron hardware. In 1857 his cousin Henry Stanley founded The Stanley Rule and Level Company in the city. Planes invented by Leonard Bailey and manufactured by the Stanley Rule and Level Company, known as “Stanley/Bailey” planes, were prized by woodworkers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries and remain popular among wood craftsmen today. The two companies merged in 1920, and the Stanley Rule and Level Company became the Hand Tools Division of Stanley Works.

The wire coat hanger was invented in 1869 by O. A. North of New Britain, Connecticut.

Bailey, aka Elizabeth Anna Duke from Beeville, Tx. aka Danielle, Weir etc… Connected to the Weather Underground:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Ann_Duke

Avery*

http://www.acorn.net/jfkplace/09/fp.back_issues/13th_Issue/copa_paines.html

Ruth Paine’s father, William Avery Hyde, undertook a Department of State/AID assignment to Peru within weeks of the publication of the Warren Report. His first tour of duty out of the country would last almost three years from October 1964 to August 1967. Mr. Hyde’s official status was that of a contract employee for CLUSA, the Cooperative League of the USA. His job title was that of Regional Insurance Advisor for Latin America. Indeed, Mr. Hyde who for many years was an insurance executive with Nationwide Insurance Company, was the only individual at the time who was accredited to the Latin America Division of the U.S. Agency for International Development for handling insurance problems. Thus he should be considered an important asset of the U.S. government’s economic policies in Latin America during that time period insofar as the promotion of capitalism and modern day business techniques was concerned.

Hyde’s tour of duty was not limited to Peru. He provided technical assistance to the launching of insurance cooperatives in Bolivia, Ecuador and Panama. His efforts were directed towards all types of coverage, including life, casualty, automobile, and mortgage insurance and brought him into contact with Latin American credit unions, banks and the housing industry. Furthermore, he urged the State Department to consider the development of a Central American Common Market modeled after the European Common Market. Hyde’s experience with insurance cooperatives led him to serve as a consultant to another CLUSAAID cooperative project in Peru called the Artisan Handicraft Project. Inasmuch as Peru’s major economic activity consisted of the folk arts, the U.S. government sought to upgrade the cottage industries and to increase the market for Peru’s export of handicrafts through modern and large scale foreign retailers such as Sears and Roebuck. This in turn would presumably lead to a better standard of living for workers via higher wages and the development of an accompanying infrastructure.

Ruth’s father contributed to the “end-of-tour” report on the Artisan Handicraft Project as it was drawing to a close.

This entry was posted in Famous People, Faraway Places and Travel, Home And Garden, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

10 Responses to Pop

  1. Renee says:

    http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gsr&GSln=Wright&GSiman=1&GScid=27534&

    Conaway, Sophia C Wright 94121927
    b. Jan. 18, 1859 d. May 7, 1936 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis City
    Missouri, USA

    Meiser, Virginia Belle Wright 49913990
    b. Aug. 16, 1852 d. Nov. 14, 1934 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Nugent, Cora E Wright 59730242
    b. Nov. 13, 1867 d. Nov. 2, 1932 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Roe, Martha Anne Wright 46834154
    b. 1817 d. Jul. 25, 1884 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Warren, Susan Maria Wright 49907335
    b. May 27, 1836 d. Jun. 13, 1916 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis City
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Alice J. Armstrong 97839313
    b. 1846 d. Dec. 25, 1892 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis City
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Anna C 19543779
    b. unknown d. Sep., 1864 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Mrs Anna E. Burgett 63553346
    b. Jan. 6, 1854 d. May 22, 1948 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis City
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Annie 19543783
    b. unknown d. Sep., 1873 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Blanche Lee 58155906
    b. Dec. 12, 1865 d. Apr. 20, 1876 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Charles 19543781
    b. unknown d. Dec., 1866 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Curilla 19543794
    b. unknown d. Dec., 1904 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Cynthia Belcher 58072989
    b. May 3, 1791 d. Aug. 2, 1831 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Daniel T 19543790
    b. unknown d. May, 1883 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Donald T. 14764864
    b. Jan. 6, 1891 d. Nov. 25, 1965 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Elizabeth C 58148038
    b. Oct. 21, 1816 d. Oct. 5, 1834 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Elsa Lemp 99040433
    b. unknown d. Mar. 20, 1920 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis City
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Elsa Lemp 8220075
    b. Feb. 8, 1883 d. Mar. 20, 1920 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Elsa Lemp 99040444
    b. unknown d. Mar. 20, 1920 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis City
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Frank Hall, Jr 82309852
    b. Mar. 19, 1891 d. Apr. 12, 1918 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis City
    Missouri, USA

    Search for “Wright” at GenealogyBank

    Wright, Rev Frank Hall 82309801
    b. Jan. 1, 1860 d. Jul. 16, 1922 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis City
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, George W 19543791
    b. unknown d. Apr., 1885 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Gertrude 19543733
    b. unknown d. Jun., 1871 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Harrison Timmons 49908985
    b. 1856 d. Jul. 10, 1875 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Hattie 19543802
    b. Apr. 10, 1859 d. Jun. 17, 1923 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Horace 75034897
    b. Jun. 6, 1804 d. Dec. 15, 1893 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis City
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Infant 19543732
    b. unknown d. May, 1871 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Isabella 19543778
    b. unknown d. Feb., 1855 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, James C 19543787
    b. unknown d. Jun., 1879 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, John C 19543735
    b. unknown d. Jun., 1873 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, John Milton 63553478
    b. 1847 d. Nov. 3, 1922 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis City
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Joseph 58072936
    b. Jan. 22, 1781 d. May 8, 1829 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Lucretia Amanda 49909269
    b. 1847 d. Jul., 1850 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Lucretia Morgan Timmons 49908210
    b. Feb. 7, 1814 d. Dec. 27, 1896 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Melissa 19543780
    b. unknown d. Aug., 1866 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Nannie Malin 58145752
    b. Aug. 5, 1844 d. Feb. 10, 1924 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Robert 19543788
    b. unknown d. Aug., 1879 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Robert F. 21601705
    b. 1846 d. 1915 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Robert Finch 49908129
    b. Mar. 31, 1846 d. May 4, 1915 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Robert Finch 49907854
    b. 1811 d. Nov. 27, 1879 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, US

    Search for “Wright” at GenealogyBank

    Wright, Sarah A 19543793
    b. unknown d. Mar., 1900 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Maj Thomas 44681450
    b. Jan. 27, 1841 d. Sep. 26, 1918 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Wiley S 58145626
    b. Jul. 13, 1821 d. Nov. 5, 1873 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, William P 58148165
    b. Dec. 13, 1825 d. Oct. 16, 1834 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, William T. 64218078
    b. 1851 d. 1857 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis City
    Missouri, USA

    Wright, Willie C 19543786
    b. unknown d. Sep., 1876 Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis city
    Missouri, USA

    http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=8220075
    Birth: Feb. 8, 1883
    St. Louis City
    Missouri, USA
    Death: Mar. 20, 1920
    St. Louis City
    Missouri, USA

    Second suicide of the infamous Lemp Family. Elsa committed suicide just 12 days after remarrying her ex-husband. She suffered from acute indigestion and severe mental depression.

    Cause of Death: Suicide, gunshot wound to heart.

    Burial:
    Bellefontaine Cemetery
    Saint Louis
    St. Louis City
    Missouri, USA

  2. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarah,_Duchess_of_York
    Sarah Margaret Ferguson is the second daughter of Major Ronald Ferguson[4] and his first wife, Susan Mary Wright.

    *WRIGHT*

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Susan_Barrantes

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Wright

    *NOTE*VESTA*
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeremiah_Wright

    Obama bribed Jeremiah Wright, Church Sermons?, … citizenwells.wordpress.com/2012/05/14/obama-bribed-jeremiah-wright-c…

    May 14, 2012 … Rev. Wright, you have the power to put all of this to rest once and for all by … How did Jeremiah Wright already know Donald Young was dead?

    Obama and Rev. Wright pronounced Donald Young dead before he … obambi.wordpress.com/2008/07/18/dead/ Obama and Rev. Wright pronounced Donald Young dead before he …

    Jul 18, 2008 … Jeremiah Wright announced Donald Young’s death at either the 7:30 AM … How did Jeremiah Wright already know Donald Young was dead?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ann_Wright
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jodie_Evans

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Lloyd_Wright

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Graham_Bell

    LOLA*
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shirley_Graham_Du_Bois

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W._E._B._Du_Bois
    Dubois means WOOD in FRENCH* NOTE*

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawrence_Dale_Bell

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_M._Young
    *NOTE* Middleton*
    Arthur Middleton Young
    Born 3 November 1905 (1905-11-03)
    Paris, France
    Died 30 May 1995 (1995-05-31)
    Berkeley, California
    Spouse(s) Priscilla Page
    Ruth Forbes

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruth_Paine

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_Young_(tennis)

  3. Renee says:

    http://www.brotherbell.com/familytrees/bell_family.html
    Bell Family
    Carter Family
    Dubois Family
    Godley Family
    Hodges Family
    Jones Family
    Padgett Family
    Polk Family
    Proveaux Family
    Rentz Family
    Varn Family

    Cail Family Trees
    Bolton Family
    Boykin Family
    Cail Family
    Lewis Family
    Parker Family
    Pengree Family
    Robeson Family
    Waters Family
    Wells Family
    Willis Family
    Zeigler Family

  4. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alphonzo_Bell
    Alphonzo Edward Bell Sr. (September 29, 1875 – December 27, 1947) was an American oil multi-millionaire, real estate developer, philanthropist, and champion tennis player. The westside Los Angeles residential community of Bel Air is named after him.

    Bell was a native and lifelong resident of Los Angeles whose family had deep financial and historical ties to the area, and played a key role in the history and development of Southern California. He was the son of James George Bell, who established Bell Station Ranch (now the site of the City of Bell), in the Santa Fe Springs area in 1875, and of Susan Albiah Hollenbeck. His uncle, Ed Hollenbeck, who arrived in California in the 1850s, founded the First National Bank, created Los Angeles’s public transportation trolley system, and developed eastern portions of Los Angeles County.

    After attending San Enselmo Presbyterian College for two years, Bell enrolled at Occidental College, which had been founded by his father in 1887, and graduated at the top of his class as valedictorian in 1895. In 1902 he married Minnewa Shoemaker Bell, a native of Kansas.[1]

    Bell’s son, Alphonzo E. Bell, Jr., later served eight terms as a California Congressman.[2] Bell’s daughter, Minnewa Bell Gray Burnside Ross, married Elliott Roosevelt, son of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, in 1951.

    [edit] Tennis achievementsOlympic medal record
    Men’s Tennis
    Silver 1904 St. Louis Doubles
    Bronze 1904 St. Louis Singles
    While in college the senior Bell was Inter-Collegiate Tennis Champion, and later Pacific Coast Tennis Champion, who at one time earned national rankings of fifth in singles and eighth in doubles. Known for his “net-rusher” style, Bell went on to win two medals in tennis at the 1904 Summer Olympics in St. Louis – a bronze in the men’s singles event, and a silver in the men’s doubles tournament, partnering with Robert LeRoy.[1]

    [edit] Oil, real estate & other business venturesAfter striking oil on their ranch at Santa Fe Springs, Bell entered the oil business with his father in the early 1920s, establishing the Bell Petroleum Co., and developing what became one of the richest oil fields in California. With the ensuing California oil boom, or “black-gold” rush, competition from various less scrupulous large oil companies was fierce—several of whom, along with William Randolph Hearst, tried to drive the more honest Bell’s smaller operation out of business—a saga documented in the fictionalized account by writer Upton Sinclair in a 1927 novel Oil!, also the basis for the 2007 movie, There Will Be Blood.[1]

    Bell, known for his almost puritanical morality and honesty, used portions of his initial profits to develop upscale real estate communities in West Los Angeles, including parts of Westwood, Beverly Hills, and Pacific Palisades. He became a visionary real estate developer, anticipating the influx of Hollywood elite and other wealthy residents who would be lured by the burgeoning film industry. In 1922, building on over 600 acres (2.4 km2) that he had acquired, Bell founded Bel Air Estates, an exclusive and upscale neighborhood now known as Bel-Air, enhancing the surrounding area with lush vegetation, new roads, and utilities; designed, laid out and developed the Bel-Air Country Club and the Bel Air Bay Club; and was a key player in the group that developed the Riviera Country Club. While many such clubs thrived on sales of bootleg liquor during the years of Prohibition, Bell refused to allow the sale of illegal spirits in any of his clubs or establishments, which lost him some membership. William Randolph Hearst’s longstanding vendetta with Bell had started when Bell refused to sell a homesite to Hearst for a home to house his silent-film-star mistress, Marion Davies in the Bell’s Bel-Air Estates development.[1]:28

    For themselves and their young extended family, Bell and his wife Minnewa in 1921 built a showplace 42-room house on 1,760 acres (710 ha) in portions of the areas that are now Bel Air and Pacific Palisades which they called Capo Di Monte (Italian for “Top of the Hill”). Today nothing of the house remains, except for some of the terraced gardens and rock walls, and their former horse riding stables, which now constitute a portion of the Bel-Air Hotel – with what was once the Bell stable’s manure barn, now one of the favorite celebrity guest suites.[1]:44

    [edit] PhilanthropyThroughout his lifetime, and just prior to his death in 1947, as well as in his will, Alphozo Bell, Sr. gave the larger share of his wealth to various charities – including Occidental College, University of California, Los Angeles, the L.A. Presbyterian Church, and other church groups and charitable organizations.

    Today, he is honored by memorial tributes to him at – among others – Occidental College, UCLA, and the Bel-Air Country Club.[1]

    Links Bel Air Association

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princess_Lilian,_Duchess_of_Halland
    *DAVIES*

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