Lassie Of Irish Luck

©Renee 2013

Lucy Goode Lucke is your guide tonight, she will take you on a tour of Ireland, it’s people, history and land. Lucy has shining, auburn curls, sparkling green eyes and a smile to light up a room. She has a friend that will help you all see the best places.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Luce

First we will note presidents there.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erskine_Hamilton_Childers

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cearbhall_%C3%93_D%C3%A1laigh

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Erskine_Childers

And an aussie that connects as well.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_Childers

Another Erskine:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erskine_Bowles

And a Shand Parker Bowles:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camilla,_Duchess_of_Cornwall

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benton_%26_Bowles

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Hyde

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fermoy

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/County_Roscommon

Pricilla Livingston Johnson McMillan is found here:

https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2013/02/27/la-plume/

And here:

https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2012/10/03/my-kennedy-notes-and-the-land-of-os/

Soundex Code for Cashin = C250

Other surnames sharing this Soundex Code:
CASHION | CASON | CESSNA | CHACON | CHESNEY | CHESSON | CHICOINE | CHISHAM | CHISM | CHISUM | COGAN | COGGAN | COGGIN | COOKSON | COUSINEAU | COXON | COZINE | CUSSON |

http://www.houseofnames.com/cashin-family-crest/Irish

Cashin, Cashion, MacCaisin, O’ Caisin, Mccashin, O’Cashen, O’Caseon, Cash, Cass, Cashion, McCashney, McCashion, Casheen, Casain, Kasain,Kasin, Mccassin, Cassin.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Munster

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/JFKnagell.htm

Richard Case Nagell was born in Greenwich, New York, on 5th August, 1930. Educated in Albany, Nagell, joined the United States Army at Albany in 1948. During the Korean War he was awarded the Bronze Star, and the Purple Heart and at the age of twenty became one of the youngest men in history to receive a field promotion to the rank of Captain.

In November, 1954, Nagell suffered severe injuries in an air crash. After recovering he was transferred to Army Counter Intelligence Corp. He served as a CIC officer in both Korea and Japan. In March, 1958, Nagell married a local woman. The couple had two children but the marriage ended in divorce.

Nagell reached the rank of Second Lieutenant by the time he left the army in October, 1959. As a result of his accident he was judged to be 50% disabled and was placed on a disability pension. In December, 1959, Nagell found work as an investigator with the Department of Employment in Los Angeles. In March, 1961, Nagell did a similar job with the California Beverage Control Board. He held the job until being sacked in June, 1962. The following month he was admitted to the Wadsworth Veterans Hospital in Los Angeles, California in what was alleged to be a self-inflicted gunshot wound in the chest.

According to Nagell, when he recovered he began working for theCentral Intelligence Agency as a double agent. This involved becoming an activist in the American Communist Party. This included distributing Marxist propaganda in Mexico.

Soundex Code for Case = C200

Other surnames sharing this Soundex Code:
CAGE | CASCIO | CASE | CASEY | CASH | CASKEY | CASS | CASSIE | CAUGHEY | CAUSEY | CEASE | CHASE | CHEEK | CHESS | CHICK | CHISKE | COACH | COASE | COCK | COCKE | COCKS | COOK | COOKE | COOKSEY | COSHOW | COSS | COSSEY | COUCH | COWICK | COX | COXE | COZZA | COZZI |

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JPMorgan_Chase

4 Indiana Dems charged with election fraud in 2008 …

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2012/04/02/4-indiana-dems-charged-with-election-fr…

Apr 3, 2012 IndianaElectionFraud. From left, Butch Morgan, Pam Brunette, Beverly Shelton and Dustin Blythe were charged April 2, 2012, in an election

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lily_Safra

Safra was born Lily Watkins] on December 30, 1934, in Porto Alegre, Brazil, daughter of Wolf White Watkins, a British railway engineer who moved to South America and Annita Noudelman de Castro, a Uruguayan of Russian-Jewish ancestry. She grew up in Rio de Janeiro. At the age of 17, she married Mario Cohen, an Argentine hosiery magnate. They had three children: Claudio (died in a car crash in Brazil ca. 1989), Eduardo, and Adriana.

Lily and Cohen divorced in the early 1960s. In 1965, she married Romanian immigrant Alfredo “Freddy” Monteverde (formerly Greenberg), a leader in the Brazilian household appliance distribution business after establishing the Ponto Frio brand. He and Lily had one child, named Carlos. In 1969, Monteverde died by suicide. According to biographer Isabel Vincent, Monteverde’s will left all his assets to her and, in concert with Monteverde’s former banker, Edmond Safra, she took swift action to cut off the rest of his family.

Lily and Edmond Safra dated for some time, but she married a businessman named Samuel Bendahan in 1972, then divorced him after about a year of marriage.

In 1976, she married Safra, a prominent Brazilian-naturalized Jewish Lebanese banker, and the founder, among other achievements, of Republic National Bank of New York. The couple divided their time between homes in Monaco, Geneva, New York and Villa Leopolda on the French Riviera. In a crime that attracted extensive media interest, Safra was killed in a fire that was determined to be arson. Edmond Safra “apparently felt so safe here that he did not have his bodyguards stay the night when he slept in Monaco. Ted Maher, a former Green Beret, who was Safra’s bodyguard and nurse, was accused of starting the fire. His lawyer, Michael Griffith, has said that Maher did indeed start the fire in order to gain acceptance from Mr. Safra and that “It was a stupid, most insane thing a human being could do,” says Griffith. “He did not intend to kill Mr. Safra. He just wanted Mr. Safra to appreciate him more. He loved Mr. Safra. This was the best job of his life. However, controversy still surrounds the case, as after his 8 year imprisonment, Maher has maintained his innocence. Safra left 50% of his assets to several charities, with the remainder divided up between his family members and wife who received $ 800 million.

Soundex Code for Nagell = N240

Other surnames sharing this Soundex Code:
NAGEL | NAGLE | NEAGLE | NICELY | NICHOL | NICKEL | NICKELL | NICOL | NICOLAY | NICOLL | NOGGLE | NOZELL |

http://www.farhi.org/wc32/wc32_195.htm

Wolf, White Watkins [2834]
Annita Noudelman De Castro [2834]
b. 1895, London UK
d. Mar 1962, Montevideo, Uruguay
occ. Owner Sonarec , Railroad Repair Company
edu. Engineer
b. ca 1900, Rivera, Uruguay [2834]
d. 25 Sep 1971, Rio De Janiero, Brasil
occ.
edu.
Children
Daniel Watkins(1921 – Mar 2002)
Artigas Watkins(1928 – 14 Nov 2006)
Mahoney, Jonas Studdart Kilkee, estates etc..Ireland:

Ireland, the emerald green….. let’s look around at it’s beauty in comments.

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40 Responses to Lassie Of Irish Luck

  1. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erskine_Hamilton_Childers
    Erskine Hamilton Childers (11 December 1905 – 17 November 1974) served as the fourth President of Ireland from 1973 until his death in 1974.[1] He was a Teachta Dála (TD) from 1938 until 1973. Childers served as Minister for Posts and Telegraphs (1951–1954, 1959–1961, and 1966–1969), Minister for Lands (1957–1959), Minister for Transport and Power (1959–1969), and Minister for Health (1969–1973). He was appointed Tánaiste in 1969.

    His father Robert Erskine Childers, a leading Irish republican and author of the espionage thriller The Riddle of the Sands, was executed during the Irish Civil War.

    4th President of Ireland
    In office
    25 June 1973 – 17 November 1974
    Preceded by Éamon de Valera
    Succeeded by Cearbhall Ó Dálaigh
    Tánaiste
    In office
    2 July 1969 – 14 March 1973
    Preceded by Frank Aiken
    Succeeded by Brendan Corish
    Personal details
    Born Erskine Hamilton Childers
    (1905-12-11)11 December 1905
    London, England
    Died 17 November 1974(1974-11-17) (aged 68)
    Dublin, Ireland
    Nationality Irish
    Political party Fianna Fáil
    Spouse(s) Ruth Ellen Dow (1925–1950)
    Rita Dudley (1952–1974)
    Children Ruth Ellen Childers
    Erskine Barton Childers
    Roderick Winthrop Childers
    Margaret Osgood Childers
    Carainn Childers
    Nessa Childers
    Alma mater Cambridge University (Trinity)
    Religion Church of Ireland

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Alden_Childers

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Alden_Black
    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/colors-of-the-rainbow-black/

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Erskine_(Welsh_boxer)

    More Erskine here:
    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2013/01/03/a-little-ringing-of-bells/

  2. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cearbhall_%C3%93_D%C3%A1laigh
    Cearbhall Ó Dálaigh (12 February 1911 – 21 March 1978; Irish pronunciation: [ˈcaɾˠwaɫ̪ oː ˈdˠaːɫ̪i]) served as the fifth President of Ireland, from 1974 to 1976. He resigned in 1976 after a clash with the government. He also had a notable legal career, including serving as Chief Justice of Ireland.

    Cearbhall Ó Dálaigh, one of four children, was born on 12 February 1911,[1] in Bray, County Wicklow.[2] His father was a shopkeeper with little interest in politics.

    Cearbhall had an older brother; Aonghus, and two younger sisters; Úna and Nuala. He went to St. Cronan’s Boys National School.[3] and later to Synge Street CBS in Dublin. While attending University College Dublin, he became auditor of An Cumann Gaelach and of the Literary and Historical Society.[4] He also became Irish language editor of the Irish Press.[5]

    [edit] CareerA graduate of University College Dublin, Ó Dálaigh was a committed Fianna Fáil supporter who served on the party’s National Executive in the 1930s, he became Ireland’s youngest Attorney General in 1946 under Taoiseach Éamon de Valera, serving until 1948. Unsuccessful in Dáil Éireann and Seanad Éireann elections in 1948 and 1951, he was re-appointed as Attorney General in 1951 and in 1953 he was appointed as the youngest member of the Supreme Court by his mentor, de Valera. Less than a decade later, he became Chief Justice, when selected by then Taoiseach, Seán Lemass. He was a keen actor in his early years and became a close friend of actor Cyril Cusack. It is commonly stated that Ó Dálaigh and Cusack picketed the Dublin launch of Disney’s Darby O’Gill and the Little People, for what they felt was the film’s stereotyping of Irish people.[6] However, there is no contemporary reference of this ever occurring.[7]

    In 1972, Taoiseach Jack Lynch suggested to the opposition parties that they agree to nominate Ó Dálaigh to become President of Ireland when President de Valera’s last term ended in June of the following year. However Fine Gael, which was confident that its prospective candidate, Tom O’Higgins, would win the 1973 presidential election (he had almost defeated de Valera in 1966) turned down the offer. However, Fianna Fáil’s Erskine H. Childers went on to win the presidential election.

    When Ireland joined the European Economic Community, Jack Lynch appointed Ó Dálaigh as Ireland’s judge on the European Court of Justice.[5] When President Childers died suddenly in 1974, all parties agreed to nominate Ó Dálaigh for the post.

    [edit] President of IrelandÓ Dálaigh tenure as president proved to be contentious. While popular with Irish language enthusiasts and artists and respected by many Republicans, he had a strained relationship with the Coalition Government, particularly with Conor Cruise O’Brien and with Liam Cosgrave.

    His decision in 1976 to exercise his power to refer a bill to the Supreme Court to test its constitutionality brought him into conflict with the Fine Gael-Labour National Coalition. Following the assassination of the British Ambassador to Ireland, Christopher Ewart-Biggs, by the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) on 23 July 1976 the government announced its intention to declare a state of emergency. Ó Dálaigh referred the resulting bill, the Emergency Powers Bill, to the Supreme Court. When the court ruled that the bill was constitutional he signed the bill into law on 16 October 1976.[8] The same day an IRA action in Mountmellick resulted in the death of Michael Clerkin, a member of the Garda Síochána police force.[9] Ó Dálaigh’s actions were seen by government ministers to have contributed to the killing of this Garda. The following day Minister for Defence Paddy Donegan, on a visit to a barracks in Mullingar to open a canteen, attacked the President for sending the bill to the Supreme Court, calling him a “thundering disgrace”[10] (or perhaps a less parliamentary expression, as contemporary sources described his language as far more vulgar).[11][12] Ó Dálaigh’s private papers show that he considered the relationship between the President (as Commander-in-Chief of the Defence Forces) and the Minister for Defence had been “irrevocably broken” by the comments of the Minister in front of the army Chief of Staff and other high-ranking officers.[13] Donegan offered his resignation but Taoiseach Liam Cosgrave refused to accept it. This proved the last straw for Ó Dálaigh, who believed that Cosgrave had additionally failed to meet his constitutional obligation to regularly brief the President.[13] He resigned on 22 October 1976, “to protect the dignity and independence of the presidency as an institution”.[8] He was succeeded by Patrick Hillery.

    [edit] DeathÓ Dálaigh died in 1978, less than two years after resigning the presidency. He is buried in Sneem, County Kerry.

    5th President of Ireland
    In office
    19 December 1974 – 22 October 1976
    Preceded by Erskine H. Childers
    Succeeded by Patrick Hillery
    Personal details
    Born (1911-02-12)12 February 1911
    Bray, Ireland
    Died 21 March 1978(1978-03-21) (aged 67)
    Dublin, Ireland
    Nationality Irish
    Political party Fianna Fáil
    Spouse(s) Mairín Bean Uí Dhálaigh
    Alma mater University College Dublin
    Profession Barrister
    Judge
    Journalist
    Religion Roman Catholicism

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/County_Wicklow

  3. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Erskine_Childers
    Robert Erskine Childers DSC (25 June 1870 – 24 November 1922), universally known as Erskine Childers,[1][2][3] (pron.: /ˈɜrskɨn ˈtʃɪldərz/)[4] was the author of the influential novel The Riddle of the Sands and an Irish nationalist who smuggled guns to Ireland in his sailing yacht Asgard. He was executed by the authorities of the nascent Irish Free State during the Irish Civil War. He was the son of British Orientalist scholar Robert Caesar Childers; the cousin of Hugh Childers and Robert Barton; and the father of the fourth President of Ireland, Erskine Hamilton Childers.

    Childers was born in Mayfair, London, the second son to Robert Caesar Childers, a translator and oriental scholar from an ecclesiastical family, and Anna Mary Henrietta, née Barton, from an Anglo-Irish landowning family of Glendalough House, Annamoe, County Wicklow[5] with interests in France such as the winery that bears their name. When Erskine was six his father died from tuberculosis and, although seemingly healthy, Anna was confined to an isolation hospital, where she was to die six years later. The children, by this time numbering five, were sent to the Bartons at Glendalough. They were treated kindly there and Erskine came to identify himself closely with the country of Ireland, albeit at that stage from the comfortable viewpoint of the “Protestant Ascendancy”.[6]

    At the recommendation of his grandfather, Canon Charles Childers, he was sent to Haileybury College. There he won an exhibition to Trinity College, Cambridge, studying the classical tripos and then law.[7] He distinguished himself as the editor of Cambridge Review, a university magazine. Notwithstanding his unattractive voice and poor debating skills, he became president of the Trinity College Debating Society (the “Magpie and Stump” society). Although Erskine was an admirer of his cousin Hugh Childers, a member of the Cabinet in favour of Irish home rule, he spoke vehemently against the policy in college debates.[5] A sciatic injury sustained while hill walking in the summer before he went up, and which was to dog him for the rest of his life, had left him slightly lame and he was unable to pursue his intention of earning a rugby blue, but he became a proficient rower.[8]

    Having gained his degree in law, and with the vague intention of one day following cousin Hugh into parliament as an MP,[9] Childers sat the competitive entry examination to become a parliamentary clerk. He was successful and early in 1895 he became a junior committee clerk in the House of Commons, with the responsibility of preparing formal and legally sound bills from the proposals of the government of the day.[10]

    [edit] Sailing
    Robert and Molly aboard Asgard on a Baltic cruise, 1910With many sporting ventures now closed to him because of his persisting sciatic injury, Childers was encouraged by Walter Runciman, a friend from schooldays, to take up sailing. After picking up the fundamentals of seamanship as a deckhand on Runciman’s yacht, in 1893 he bought his own vessel, the “scrubby little yacht” Sheila, which he learned to sail alone on the Thames estuary.[11][12] Bigger and better boats followed: by 1895 he was taking the half-deck Marguerite across the Channel and in 1897 there was a long cruise to the Frisian Islands, Norderney and the Baltic with his brother Henry in the thirty-foot cutter Vixen: a voyage he repeated in the following spring. These were the adventures he was to fictionalise in 1903 as The Riddle of the Sands, his most famous book.[13] In 1903 Childers, now accompanied by his new wife Molly, was again cruising in the Frisian Islands, in Sunbeam, a boat he shared with William le Fanu and other friends from his university days. However his father-in-law, Dr Hamilton Osgood, had arranged for a fine 28-ton yacht, Asgard, to be built for the couple as a wedding gift and Sunbeam was only a temporary measure while Asgard was being fitted out.

  4. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_Childers
    Hugh Culling Eardley Childers (25 June 1827 – 29 January 1896) was a British and Australian Liberal statesman of the nineteenth century. He is perhaps best known for his reform efforts at the Admiralty and the War Office. Later in his career, as Chancellor of the Exchequer, his attempt to correct a budget shortfall led to the fall of the Liberal government led by William Ewart Gladstone.

    Childers was born in London, the son of Reverend Eardley Childers and his wife Maria Charlotte (née Smith),[1] sister of Sir Culling Eardley, 3rd Baronet and granddaughter of Sampson Eardley, 1st Baron Eardley. He was educated at Cheam School and then both Wadham College, Oxford and Trinity College, Cambridge, graduating B.A. from the latter in 1850.[2] Childers then decided to seek a career in Australia and on 26 October 1850 arrived in Melbourne, Victoria along with his wife Emily Walker.[1]

    [edit] AustraliaChilders joined the government of Victoria and served as inspector of schools and immigration agent; in 1852 he became a director of the Melbourne, Mount Alexander and Murray River Railway Co. Childers became auditor-general in October 1852 and was nominated to the Victorian Legislative Council.[1] In 1852 he placed a bill before the state legislature proposing the establishment of a second university for Victoria, following the foundation of the University of Sydney in 1850. With the receipt of the Royal Assent in 1853, the University of Melbourne was founded, with Childers as its first vice-chancellor.[1]

    [edit] Return to BritainChilders retained the vice-chancellorship until his return to Britain in March 1857 and received a M.A. from Cambridge the same year.

    [edit] Enters British politicsIn 1860 he entered Parliament as the Liberal member for Pontefract, and served in a minor capacity in the government of Lord Palmerston, becoming a Civil Lord of the Admiralty in 1864 and Financial Secretary to the Treasury in 1865.
    In office
    9 August 1872 – 30 September 1873
    Monarch Victoria
    Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone
    Preceded by The Earl of Dufferin
    Succeeded by John Bright
    Secretary of State for War
    In office
    28 April 1880 – 16 December 1882
    Monarch Victoria
    Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone
    Preceded by Frederick Stanley
    Succeeded by Spencer Cavendish, Marquess of Hartington
    Chancellor of the Exchequer
    In office
    16 December 1882 – 9 June 1885
    Monarch Victoria
    Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone
    Preceded by William Ewart Gladstone
    Succeeded by Sir Michael Hicks Beach, Bt
    Home Secretary
    In office
    6 February 1886 – 25 July 1886
    Monarch Victoria
    Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone
    Preceded by R. A. Cross
    Succeeded by Henry Matthews
    Personal details
    Born 25 June 1827 (2013-01-11T03:55:14)
    London
    Died 29 January 1896 (2013-01-11T03:55:15)
    London
    Nationality British
    Political party Liberal
    Spouse(s) Emily Walker (d. 1875)
    Alma mater Wadham College, Oxford
    Trinity College, Cambridge

  5. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benton_%26_Bowles
    The agency’s success was closely related to the rise in popularity of radio. Benton & Bowles invented the radio soap opera to promote their clients’ products, and by 1936 were responsible for three of the four most popular radio programs on the air. [1]

    In 1956, B&B and their client Procter & Gamble launched the nationally-televised soap opera As The World Turns on CBS.

    B&B created some of the most memorable commercials on television, including “Look, Ma, No Cavities” for Crest toothpaste and “When E.F. Hutton Talks, People Listen” for the New York brokerage house.

    Benton & Bowles merged with D’Arcy-MacManus Masius (D-MM) in 1985 to form D’Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles (DMB&B). The agency later merged with Leo Burnett Worldwide to form BCOM3 which was subsequently bought by Publicis, marking the demise of the Benton & Bowles brand.

    And again note*
    Bowles, PARKER, Shand, Kidd
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camilla,_Duchess_of_Cornwall

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/As_The_World_Turns

    • Renee says:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Procter_%26_Gamble
      William Procter, a candlemaker, and James Gamble, a soapmaker, emigrated from England and Ireland respectively. They settled in Cincinnati initially and met when they married sisters, Olivia and Elizabeth Norris.[4] Alexander Norris, their father-in-law, called a meeting in which he persuaded his new sons-in-law to become business partners. On October 31, 1837, as a result of the suggestion, Procter & Gamble was created.

      In 1858–1859, sales reached $1 million. By this point, approximately 80 employees worked for Procter & Gamble. During the American Civil War, the company won contracts to supply the Union Army with soap and candles. In addition to the increased profits experienced during the war, the military contracts introduced soldiers from all over the country to Procter & Gamble’s products.

      In the 1880s, Procter & Gamble began to market a new product, an inexpensive soap that floats in water. The company called the soap Ivory. William Arnett Procter, William Procter’s grandson, began a profit-sharing program for the company’s workforce in 1887. By giving the workers a stake in the company, he correctly assumed that they would be less likely to go on strike.

      The company began to build factories in other locations in the United States because the demand for products had outgrown the capacity of the Cincinnati facilities. The company’s leaders began to diversify its products as well and, in 1911, began producing Crisco, a shortening made of vegetable oils rather than animal fats. As radio became more popular in the 1920s and 1930s, the company sponsored a number of radio programs. As a result, these shows often became commonly known as “soap operas.”

      Procter & Gamble headquarters in Downtown Cincinnati, OhioThe company moved into other countries, both in terms of manufacturing and product sales, becoming an international corporation with its 1930 acquisition of the Thomas Hedley Co., based in Newcastle upon Tyne, England. Procter & Gamble maintained a strong link to the North East of England after this acquisition. Numerous new products and brand names were introduced over time, and Procter & Gamble began branching out into new areas. The company introduced Tide laundry detergent in 1946 and Prell shampoo in 1947. In 1955, Procter & Gamble began selling the first toothpaste to contain fluoride, known as Crest. Branching out once again in 1957, the company purchased Charmin Paper Mills and began manufacturing toilet paper and other paper products. Once again focusing on laundry, Procter & Gamble began making Downy fabric softener in 1960 and Bounce fabric softener sheets in 1972. One of the most revolutionary products to come out on the market was the company’s Pampers, first test-marketed in 1961. Prior to this point disposable diapers were not popular, although Johnson & Johnson had developed a product called Chux. Babies always wore cloth diapers, which were leaky and labor intensive to wash. Pampers provided a convenient alternative, albeit at the environmental cost of more waste requiring landfilling.

      Procter & Gamble acquired a number of other companies that diversified its product line and significantly increased profits. These acquisitions included Folgers Coffee, Norwich Eaton Pharmaceuticals (the makers of Pepto-Bismol), Richardson-Vicks, Noxell (Noxzema), Shulton’s Old Spice, Max Factor, and the Iams Company, among others. In 1994, the company made headlines for big losses resulting from leveraged positions in interest rate derivatives, and subsequently sued Bankers Trust for fraud; this placed their management in the unusual position of testifying in court that they had entered into transactions that they were not capable of understanding. In 1996, Procter & Gamble again made headlines when the Food and Drug Administration approved a new product developed by the company, Olestra. Also known by its brand name ‘Olean’, Olestra is a lower-calorie substitute for fat in cooking potato chips and other snacks.

      Procter & Gamble has dramatically expanded throughout its history, but its headquarters still remains in Cincinnati.

      In January 2005 P&G announced an acquisition of Gillette, forming the largest consumer goods company and placing Unilever into second place. This added brands such as Gillette razors, Duracell, Braun, and Oral-B to their stable. The acquisition was approved by the European Union and the Federal Trade Commission, with conditions to a spinoff of certain overlapping brands. P&G agreed to sell its SpinBrush battery-operated electric toothbrush business to Church & Dwight. It also divested Gillette’s oral-care toothpaste line, Rembrandt. The deodorant brands Right Guard, Soft & Dri, and Dry Idea were sold to Dial Corporation.[5] The companies officially merged on October 1, 2005. Liquid Paper, and Gillette’s stationery division, Paper Mate were sold to Newell Rubbermaid. In 2008, P&G branched into the record business with its sponsorship of Tag Records, as an endorsement for TAG Body Spray.[6]

      P&G’s dominance in many categories of consumer products makes its brand management decisions worthy of study.[7] For example, P&G’s corporate strategists must account for the likelihood of one of their products cannibalizing the sales of another.[8]

      On August 24, 2009, the Ireland-based pharmaceutical company Warner Chilcott announced they had bought P&G’s prescription-drug business for $3.1 billion.[9]

      P&G exited the food business in 2012 when it sold its Pringles snack food business to Kellogg’s. The company had previously sold Jif peanut butter and Folgers coffee in separate transactions to Smucker’s.

      The board of directors of Procter & Gamble currently has eleven members:

      Robert A. McDonald
      Angela Braly
      Meg Whitman
      Johnathan A. Rodgers
      Ernesto Zedillo
      Scott Cake
      Patricia A. Woertz
      Susan D. Desmond-Hellmann
      Maggie Wilderotter
      W. James McNerney, Jr.
      Kenneth Chenault.[11]
      In March 2011 Rajat Gupta resigned from the board after a SEC accusation of Galleon Group insider trading

      • Renee says:

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rajat_Gupta

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McKinsey_%26_Company
        McKinsey & Company was founded in 1926 in Chicago by James McKinsey under the name James O. McKinsey & Company.[6][7] Previously, James McKinsey served as an accounting professor at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and is considered the father of managerial accounting.[8] Advocates for the concepts introduced in McKinsey’s book, Budgetary Control, were among McKinsey’s first clients.[8][9] The book founded the practice of managerial accounting.[8]

        Mr. McKinsey hired Tom Kearney and Marvin Bower in the early 1930s.[6][10] In 1935,[11] In 1935, Marshall Field’s became a client and in 1935 convinced McKinsey to leave the firm to accept a temporary position and become its Chairman and CEO, in order to help the company through a restructuring.[9][12] After McKinsey left, the remaining members of the firm agreed to merge with the accounting firm Scovell, Wellington & Company in 1935, leading to the creation of McKinsey, Wellington & Co.[11]

        In 1937 James O. McKinsey died unexpectedly of pneumonia, which led to the division of McKinsey, Wellington & Company in 1939. C. Oliver Wellington returned to manage Scovell, Wellington & Company full-time and took the accounting practice with him. The management engineering practice was split into two affiliated firms: McKinsey & Company and McKinsey, Kearney & Company, which later became known as A.T. Kearney. McKinsey & Company was led by Guy Crockett, Dick Fletcher, and Marvin Bower.[citation needed] Guy Crockett became Managing Partner of McKinsey & Company, running day-to-day operations, while Marvin Bower handled conceptual and long-term strategy as Crockett’s deputy.[11] Bower would lead the company for 30 years with a focus on being “professional” in looks, tone, and conduct.[13]

        McKinsey & Company is credited with creating modern management consulting as a professional service.[11][14] Marvin Bower is credited with shaping the firm’s values and principles.[15] Bower’s idea was to create a management consulting firm working with senior executives with the same professional standards he had witnessed as a lawyer for the firm of Jones Day Reavis & Pogue,[16] in Cleveland.[9]

        In New York, Bower established the firm’s core principles in a 1937 memo.[11][17] According to Fortune Magazine:

        “A McKinsey consultant is supposed to put the interests of his client ahead of increasing The Firm’s revenues; he should keep his mouth shut about his client’s affairs; he should tell the truth and not be afraid to challenge a client’s opinion; and he should only agree to perform work that he feels is both necessary and something McKinsey can do well. Along with the professional code, Bower insisted on professional, as opposed to business, language, which is why McKinsey is always The Firm, never the company; jobs are engagements; and The Firm has a practice, not a business.”[9]

        [edit] 1940s and 1950sIn the early 1940s, Bower placed more emphasis on persuading clients to accept and act on its recommendations. In 1945 the firm established a New Engagement and Executive Relations Guide.[11]

        In 1950 Guy Crockett stepped down as managing director and Bower served as the firm’s managing director until 1967. The firm’s profit-sharing, executive and planning committees were formed in 1951.[11] In 1953 McKinsey began hiring consultants straight out of business school. Bower decided to hire and train primarily young graduates at a time when most consultants were mature executives and experienced professionals.[17] The postwar period was a time of expansion for McKinsey and the economy in general. McKinsey’s client base grew to include several bluechip, defense contractors, government, and military organizations.[15]

        The “up or out” philosophy, which says that consultants should find a role outside of the firm if they are not advancing, was first implemented in 1954[citation needed] after years of internal consensus building. The move was internally controversial. The McKinsey ownership plan was adopted to improve incentives in 1956 and more guidelines were formalized on profit sharing, promotions, and elections. After seven years of deliberation, McKinsey turned itself into a private corporation with shares exclusive to McKinsey employees. McKinsey’s planning committee developed a plan for international expansion and established an office in London in 1959.[11] By 1952 McKinsey & Company formally parted ways with McKinsey, Kearney & Company, which was renamed A.T. Kearney & Company.

        [edit] 1960 – 1990In 1964 McKinsey started publishing the McKinsey Quarterly, a business journal written primarily by McKinsey consultants.[18] In the 1970s, McKinsey was faced with a loss of market-share[15] and began investing in what it called “systematic knowledge-building”.[9]

        After stepping down as managing director in 1967, Marvin Bower sold his shares back to McKinsey believing this would give young partners a sense of ownership in the firm.[9] Future consultants followed his example.[15] In 1976, Ron Daniel was elected managing director and served until 1988.[19] Daniel worked for McKinsey for almost fifty years and led the New York office.[19] From 1977 to 1981, a group of 15-20 partners organized to address the issue of clients not acting on McKinsey’s advice.[20]

        Fred Gluck was McKinsey’s managing director from 1988 to 1994.[citation needed] Under Gluck’s tenure, McKinsey increased its international focus by opening 17 new offices outside the United States. He also created an internal network for sharing knowledge and experience among McKinsey consultants[21] and spent $50 million on knowledge building.[9] Over two decades McKinsey & Company grew eightfold.[16] In 1989 the firm acquired the Information Consulting Group (ICG), but a culture clash[clarification needed] caused many ICG employees to leave.[15]

        [edit] 1990sIn 1990, the firm established an economics think tank on globalization, corporate strategy and governance called the McKinsey Global Institute.[citation needed] Firm revenues more than doubled from 1993 to 2004 with 20 new offices and twice as many employees.[15] In 1994 Rajat Gupta became the first non-American-born partner to be elected as the firm’s managing director.[22] By the end of his tenure, McKinsey had grown from 2,900 to 7,000 consultants, who were working across 82 offices in over 40 countries.[23][24]

        In the 1990s, Anil Kumar set up “accelerators” for smaller internet startups to get started, accepting stock-based reimbursement for its services.[24][25] The Business Technology Office was started in 1997 to focus on IT consulting and was growing at an annualized rate of 30% by 2003.[15]

        [edit] 2000 onwardRecently McKinsey has focused more on expansion in Asia and developing practices focused on the public and social sectors. In 2001, McKinsey launched several practices that focused on the public and social sector, which included taking on hundreds of nonprofit or public sector clients on a pro bono basis.[15] By 2002 McKinsey invested a $35.8 million budget on knowledge management, up from $8.3 million in 1999. As the firm rebounded from the dot-com bust, its recruiting efforts substantially expanded in 2003 with 1,600 new hires, a 60 percent increase over the prior year.[15]

        In 2003, Ian Davis, the head of the London office, was elected to managing director.[26] Davis promised a return to the company’s core values, after a period in which some felt the firm had expanded too quickly and strayed from its heritage.[27] Davis was the first managing director to run the firm outside the US from his London office. By 2004, more than 60 percent of revenues came from outside the US and consultants were citizens of 95 countries. In 2003, the firm established a headquarters for the Asia-Pacific region in Shanghai.[15] By 2009 the firm had 400 directors (senior partners), up from 151 in 1993.[9][28]

        Dominic Barton was elected as Managing Director in 2009 and re-elected in 2012.[28] He had previously been selected by Ian Davis to lead McKinsey’s offices in Asia.[26][29] Barton has suggested companies take a longer-term view and avoid “quarterly capitalism” he says took root before the financial crisis.[30] The firm also conducted research and advocated for a greater role for women in business during this time period.[31][32]

        [edit] Organization and administrationThe firm, while formally organized as a corporation, functions as a partnership in all important respects. Its managing director is elected for a three-year term by the firm’s other senior partners. Each managing director can serve a maximum of three terms, a policy instituted by Gupta. At a strategic level, a number of committees are charged with the development of policies and making critical decisions. Committee memberships, senior roles, and the managing director position all rotate regularly among the firm’s senior partners and directors.[33]

        Former managing director Rajat Gupta explains McKinsey’s structure as follows:

        It is very much, in many dimensions, like an academic organization. We have senior partners who are very much like tenured faculty: they are leaders in their own right. […] We have about 80 to 100 performance cells — a geographic office or industry practice or functional practice. They are very much autonomous and they are not organized in any hierarchy beyond that. We don’t have any regional structures or sectoral structures. So all these performance units, in a theoretical sense, report to me, which means they don’t report to anybody, because nobody can have 80 or 100 people reporting to them.[33]

        The firm operates under a practice of “up or out”, meaning that consultants must either advance in their consulting careers within a pre-defined timeframe or leave the firm. “25% of the firm is new every year,” Gupta says, “so half the people have less than two to three years’ tenure in the firm, and their values need to be reinforced.” All senior roles rotate among the directors (senior partners).[33][34]

        McKinsey has about 9,000 consultants in 97 locations in 55 countries,[35] working with more than 90% of the 100 leading global corporations and two-thirds of the Fortune 1000 list. Forbes estimated the firm’s 2009 revenues at $6.6 billion.[36] The notion of company growth has been controversial from the 1970s as the firm began its global expansion; McKinsey opened many new offices under Rajat Gupta’s tenure in the late 1990s. The election of British-born Ian Davis as Gupta’s successor was seen as “a return to McKinsey’s heritage”.[37]

        This philosophy has come under increased scrutiny with the Galleon case, with some questioning whether the firm is a discreet broker of confidential or even inside information marketed as “best practices”.[38]

        Notable longtime McKinsey partners include: Dominic Barton; managing director, Ron Daniel; senior partner emeritus, Ian Davis; senior partner emeritus, Anil Kumar; former senior partner, Rajat Gupta; senior partner emeritus and Michael Patsalos-Fox; senior partner.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anil_Kumar

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ian_Davis

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crispin_Davis

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A.T._Kearney

        *NOTE* KEARNEY*
        Virginia and Cecil Goeldner * Cecil says his grandma was Emma Canfield*
        http://genealogy.about.com/od/aframertrees/p/obama_four.htm
        The family tree of Barack Obama includes great great great grandparents with the following surnames – Dunham, Stroup, Kearney, Holloway, Armour, Clark, …

        • Renee says:

          The family tree of Barack Obama includes great great great grandparents with the following surnames – Dunham, Stroup, Kearney, Holloway, Armour, Clark, …

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natalee_Holloway
          Natalee Ann Holloway (October 21, 1986 – on or after May 30, 2005) was an American student who vanished on a high school graduation trip to Aruba, a Caribbean country within the Kingdom of the Netherlands. Holloway lived in Mountain Brook, Alabama at the time of her disappearance, and graduated from Mountain Brook High School on May 24, 2005, shortly before the trip.[4] Her disappearance caused a media sensation in the United States.[5]

          Holloway was scheduled to fly home later on May 30, but failed to appear for her flight.[6] She was last seen by her classmates outside Carlos’n Charlie’s, a Caribbean chain restaurant and nightclub in Oranjestad,[7] in a car with locals Joran van der Sloot and brothers Deepak and Satish Kalpoe. When questioned, the three men said they dropped her off at her hotel and denied knowing what became of Holloway.[8] Upon further investigation by authorities, Van der Sloot was arrested twice on suspicion of involvement in her disappearance and the Kalpoes were each arrested three times. Due to lack of evidence the three men were released without charge each time.

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joran_van_der_Sloot

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandip_Gupta

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanjay_Gupta

      • Renee says:

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irna_Phillips

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Phillips_(musician)

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phillips_Petroleum_Company

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ConocoPhillips

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archie_W._Dunham
        Archie W. Dunham (born 1938) is the Independent Non-Executive Chairman of Chesapeake Energy in Oklahoma City. He served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Conoco Inc.[1] from January 1996 to August 2002, then as Chairman of ConocoPhillips, following the merger of Conoco Inc. and Phillips Petroleum Company, until his retirement on September 30, 2004.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chesapeake_Energy
        Founded in 1989 by McClendon and former President and COO Tom L. Ward, the company began with 10 employees and a $50,000 initial investment. McClendon named the company due to his love of the Chesapeake Bay region.[5] Focusing on a strategy of drilling horizontal natural gas wells in unconventional reservoirs, the company built a sizable position in the Golden Trend and Sholem Alechem fields of South-central Oklahoma and in the Giddings field of Southeast Texas.

        In 1993, the company completed its IPO at a split-adjusted price of $1.33 per share. In 1995, Chesapeake moved from the NASDAQ to the NYSE and changed its stock symbol to CHK.[6]

        After struggling with attempts to extend the Austin Chalk play into western and central Louisiana and the coinciding price collapse of oil and natural gas in the late 1990s, the company modified its strategy to focus almost exclusively on natural gas production. This focus utilized the newest technologies to target a more diversified, longer reserve life and lower base risk asset base and began to incorporate acquisitions into the company’s business plan.

        During the years 2003–2007, the company experienced rapid growth thanks to upward shifts in U.S. natural gas prices. During this time, the company expanded its land positions into unconventional reservoirs such as fractured carbonates, tight sandstone and shales, such as the Barnett, Fayetteville, and Marcellus shales. In 2006, Chesapeake was added to the S&P 500, replacing Dana Corporation.

        In 2008, Chesapeake announced its discovery of the Haynesville Shale in East Texas and northwestern Louisiana. The Haynesville Shale is projected to become the nation’s largest natural gas producer by 2015 and along with the Marcellus Shale, perhaps one of the five largest natural gas fields in the world over time.

        The company celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2009 by partnering with Orange County Choppers to create the world’s first compressed natural gas (CNG)-powered chopper.

        On July 22, 2011, Chesapeake Energy agreed to a twelve-year naming rights partnership with the Oklahoma City Thunder to rename their arena Chesapeake Energy Arena.[7] The agreement between Chesapeake and the Thunder has an initial annual cost of $3.0 million with a 3.0% annual escalation.[7] Included in the agreement Chesapeake will have its branding throughout the building, prominent premium placement on the high-definition scoreboard and on new state-of-the-art interior and exterior digital signs.[8]

        In June 2012, the company appointed Archie W. Dunham as chairman, replacing Aubrey McClendon, who retained his position as CEO. Dunham, who retired as chairman of ConocoPhillips in 2004, was appointed in response to shareholder concerns about corporate governance issues under McClendon’s watch.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aubrey_McClendon

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gordon_McLendon

  6. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne,_Princess_Royal
    Anne, Princess Royal KG[2] KT[3] GCVO (Anne Elizabeth Alice Louise; born 15 August 1950), is the only daughter and second child of Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. At the time of her birth, she was third (behind her mother and elder brother) and rose to second (after her mother’s accession) in the line of succession to the thrones of the 16 Commonwealth realms; however, after the birth of two younger brothers and six nieces and nephews she is currently tenth in line.

    The seventh holder of the title Princess Royal, Anne is known for her charitable work, being the patron of over 200 organisations, and she carries out about 500 royal engagements and public appearances per year. She is also known for equestrian talents; she won two silver medals (1975) and one gold medal (1971) at the European Eventing Championships,[4] and was the first member of the British Royal Family to have competed in the Olympic Games. Currently married to Vice-Admiral Sir Timothy Laurence, she has two children from her previous marriage to Mark Phillips and two granddaughters.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_Philip,_Duke_of_Edinburgh

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Phillips
    IssueName Birth Marriage Issue
    Peter Phillips 15 November 1977 17 May 2008 Autumn Kelly Savannah Phillips
    Isla Phillips
    Zara Phillips 15 May 1981 30 July 2011 Mike Tindall
    Felicity Tonkin 10 August 1985
    Stephanie Phillips 2 October 1997

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandy_Pflueger
    Sandy Pflueger (born 1954) is an American equestrienne. She has competed successfully in both eventing and dressage, finishing second at the prestigious Badminton Horse Trials in 1981 and competing on the United States Dressage Team at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics.

    On 1 February 1997, Sandy Pflueger married British Olympian and coach of the American Eventing team, Captain Mark Phillips, whose first wife was Princess Anne, the daughter of Queen Elizabeth II. Mrs. Phillips coached the US eventing team in dressage, alongside her husband.

    The couple lived in England with their daughter, Stephanie (b. Oct. 2, 1997). Pflueger is also stepmother to Peter Phillips and Zara Phillips, the oldest grandchildren of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom.

    Helen Sandy Pflueger Phillips was partially involved with the Kaloko dam break in Hawaii, which, after a period of heavy rain, killed seven people in the pre dawn hours of March 14, 2006.[1]

    It emerged in May 2012 that Capt. Phillips has left his second wife and intends to divorce her having become involved with another woman, Lauren Hough.

  7. Renee says:

    Walker*
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rachel_Lambert_Mellon
    Known as Bunny, she is the eldest child of Gerard Barnes Lambert, Sr., a president of Gillette Safety Razor Co. and a founder of Warner-Lambert (Warner-Lambert is now part of Pfizer, following a 2000 merger).[1] One of her grandfathers, chemist Jordan Lambert, invented Listerine, although it was her father who commercialized it.[2] Her mother was the former Rachel Lowe. She had two siblings: Gerard Barnes Lambert, Jr. (1912–1947; married Elsa Conver, former wife of Angus D. Mackintosh); and Lily Cary Lambert (1914–2006; married William Wilson Fleming and John Gilman McCarthy).[1]

    Mellon’s parents divorced in 1933, and in 1934, her mother re-married her former brother-in-law, Dr. Malvern Bryan Clopton, the widower of Gerard Lambert, Sr.’s sister, Lily Lambert Walker. In 1936, Gerard Lambert, Sr. also was re-married, to Grace Cleveland Lansing Mull, the former wife of John B. Mull and a daughter of Henry Livingston Lansing.[citation needed]

    Forbes Magazine has been unable to put any sort of definitive number on Mellon’s net worth since much of her fortune is tied up in trusts, but it is apparent that she is both extraordinarily wealthy and very private. In 2011, it was revealed that she had lost US$5.75M to investment adviser and convicted Ponzi scheme operator Ken Starr. Her attorney, Alex Forger, said: “She’s well off, but assets are not liquid.” She maintains homes in Antigua, Nantucket, and Oyster Harbors on Cape Cod, but two apartments in Paris and a townhouse in New York City were recently sold.[2] Her main residence, Oak Spring Farms, a 4,000-acre (1,600 ha) estate in Virginia, has its own 1-mile (1,600 m) long airstrip for her Falcon 2000.[3][4] She amassed an extraordinary collection of works by artist Mark Rothko, having purchased many of his 1950s works directly from his New York studio. One of the works, Yellow Expanse, is considered one of the greatest works that remains in private hands.[4][5]

    Mellon has long been known for her maximum discretion and minimum exposure. In a rare 1969 New York Times article, she proclaimed that “nothing should be noticed”.[6]

    [edit] MarriagesRachel Lowe Lambert married Stacy Barcroft Lloyd, Jr. in Philadelphia in 1932.[7] Lloyd served in the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. They divorced in 1948. They had two children:

    Stacy Barcroft Lloyd, III
    Eliza Winn Lloyd (died May 7, 2008; married and divorced Viscount Moore).[8] In May 2000, Eliza was hit by a truck while crossing a Manhattan street and suffered a severe brain injury. She became quadriplegic and unable to speak. She spent the remaining eight years of her life under round-the-clock care at Oak Spring Farms.[2][9]
    Lambert and Lloyd became close friends of banking heir and art collector Paul Mellon and his first wife, Mary Conover, who died of an asthma attack in 1946. After she divorced Lloyd, Paul and Bunny were married on May 1, 1948.[4] By this marriage, she had two stepchildren, Timothy Mellon and Catherine Conover Mellon (later Mrs. John Warner and now known as Catherine Conover). Together the couple collected and donated more than 1,000 works of art, mostly eighteenth- and nineteenth-century European paintings, to the National Gallery of Art.[10] The couple also bred and raced thoroughbred horses, including a winner of the Kentucky Derby.[11]

    In his autobiography, Reflections in a Silver Spoon, Paul Mellon wrote movingly of the warmth his wife brought to Oak Spring Farms, on the National Register of Historic Places. The couple decided to move out of the property’s stately brick house, designed in 1941 by William Adams Delano, whose neo-Georgian mansions were much favored by Rockefellers, Vanderbilts and other plutocrats of that era. They commissioned New York architect H. Page Cross to design Little Oak Spring, the much cozier farmhouse, completed in 1955, where Mellon still lives.

    *Lily Lambert Walker

    Dr. Malvern Bryan Clopton of Missouri – American History http://www.cloptonfamily.org/d_hist/drmalbrc.html

    A direct descendant of William Clopton, Gentleman and Ann (Booth) Dennett Clopton, his first wife was Lily (Lambert) Walker, the widow of James T. Walker.

    William Clopton / Anne Booth http://www.phelpsfamilyhistory.com/genealogy/d0016/f0000001.asp

    Husband: William Clopton. Born: 1655[687], at: Essex, England. Married: ABT 1677, at: Died: 1728, at: New Kent, Virginia, USA. Father: William Clopton. Mother …

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knights_of_the_Golden_Horseshoe_Expedition

  8. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Kinzie
    John Kinzie (December 3, 1763 – January 6, 1828) was a fur trader from Quebec who first operated in Detroit and what became the Northwest Territory of the United States. A partner of William Burnett from Canada, about 1802-1803 Kinzie moved with his wife and child to Chicago, where they were among the first permanent European settlers. Kinzie Street (400N) in Chicago is named for him.[1] Their daughter Ellen Marion Kinzie, born in 1805, was believed to be the first child of European descent born in the settlement.

    In 1812 Kinzie killed Jean La Lime, who worked as an interpreter at Fort Dearborn in Chicago. His claim of self-defense was affirmed by an inquest of Captain Nathan Heald, commanding officer of the fort. This was known as “the first murder in Chicago”.[2]

    During the War of 1812, when living in Detroit, Kinzie was accused of treason by the British and imprisoned on a ship for transport to Great Britain. After escaping, he returned to USA territory, settling again in Chicago by 1816. He lived there the rest of his years.

    Kinzie was born in Quebec City, Canada (then in the Colonial Province of Quebec) to John and Anne McKenzie, Scots-Irish immigrants. His father died before Kinzie was a year old, and his mother remarried. In 1773, the boy was apprenticed to George Farnham, a silversmith. Some of the jewelry created by Kinzie has been found in archaeological digs in Ohio.

    By 1777, Kinzie had become a trader in Detroit, where he worked for William Burnett. As a trader, he became familiar with local Native American peoples and likely learned the dominant language. He developed trading at the Kekionga, a center of the Miami people.

    In 1785, Kinzie helped rescue two USA citizens sisters, who had been kidnapped in 1775 from Virginia by the Shawnee and adopted into the tribe. One of the girls, Margaret McKinzie, married him;[3] her sister Elizabeth married his companion Clark. Margaret lived with Kinzie in Detroit and had three children with him. After several years, she left Kinzie and Detroit, and returned to Virginia with their children. All three of the Kinzie children eventually moved as adults to Chicago.

    In 1789, Kinzie lost his business in the Kekionga (modern Fort Wayne, Indiana) and had to move further from the western U.S. frontier. The US was excluding Canadians from trade with the Native Americans in their territory. As the United States settlers continued to populate its western territory, Kinzie moved further west.

    [edit] Marriage and move to Chicago
    1857 drawing of John Kinzie house c. 1804, near the mouth of the Chicago River. The house was built by Jean Baptiste Point du Sable.In 1800 Kinzie married again, to Eleanor Lytle McKillip. By the time they moved to Chicago, about 1802-1804, they had a year-old son, John. Eleanor had three more children in Chicago. Their daughter Ellen Marion Kinzie, believed to be the first European child of European descent born in Chicago, was born in 1805; followed by Maria Indiana in 1807, and Robert Allen Kinzie in 1810.

    In 1804 Kinzie purchased the former house and lands of Jean Baptiste Point du Sable, located near the mouth of the Chicago River.[2] His partner William Burnett had owned the house since 1800. That same year, Governor William Henry Harrison of the Indiana Territory appointed Kinzie as a justice of the peace.

    [edit] War of 1812After the USA citizens built Fort Dearborn, Kinzie’s influence and reputation rose in the area; he was useful because of his relationship with the Native Americans. The War of 1812 began between Great Britain and the United States, and tensions rose on the northern frontier.

    In June 1812, Kinzie killed Jean La Lime, who worked as an interpreter at Fort Dearborn. He fled to Milwaukee, then in Indian territory.[4] While in Milwaukee, he met with pro-British Indians who were planning attacks on USA settlements, including Chicago. During this period, an inquest at Fort Dearborn under Captain Nathan Heald exonerated Kinzie in the killing of La Lime, ruling it was in self-defense.[2] Historians speculate that La Lime may have been informing on corruption related to purchasing supplies within the fort and been silenced. The case has been called “Chicago’s first murder.”[2]

    Although worried that Chicago would be on heightened alert, the Indians attacked Fort Dearborn on August 15, 1812, and killed most of the people in the fort. Kinzie escaped with his family unharmed and returned to Detroit. Identifying as a British citizen, Kinzie had a strong anti-USA streak.

    In 1813, the British arrested Kinzie and Jean Baptiste Chardonnai, also then living in Detroit, charging them with treason. They were accused of having corresponded with the enemy (the USA General Harrison’s[disambiguation needed] army) while supplying gunpowder to chief Tecumseh’s Indian forces, who were fighting alongside the British. Chardonnai escaped, but Kinzie was imprisoned on a ship for transport to England. When the ship put into port in Nova Scotia to weather a storm, Kinzie escaped. He returned to USA-held Detroit by 1814.

    Formerly identifying as a British citizen, Kinzie switched to the United States. He returned to Chicago with his family in 1816 and lived there until his death in 1828.

    [edit] Death and legacy
    John Kinzie’s grave in Graceland CemeteryKinzie suffered a stroke on January 6, 1828 and died a few hours later. Originally buried at the Fort Dearborn Cemetery, Kinzie’s remains were moved to City Cemetery in 1835. When the cemetery was closed for the development of Lincoln Park, Kinzie’s remains were moved to Graceland Cemetery.

    In 1837, Kinzie’s son John H. Kinzie ran for the position of the first mayor of Chicago, losing to William Butler Ogden.
    Maria Kinzie, a granddaughter, married George H. Steuart, a captain in the US cavalry from Maryland. He later served as a general in the Confederate Army.[5]
    His great-granddaughter, Juliette Gordon Low, was the founder of the Girl Scouts of the USA.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juliette_Augusta_Magill_Kinzie
    Juliette Magill was born in Middletown, Connecticut, she was well educated attending a boarding school in New Haven, Connecticut, and was tutored in Latin and other languages by her uncle Alexander Wolcott. She also studied at Emma Willard’s school in Troy, New York. Alexander Wolcott introduced Juliette to John H. Kinzie, son of Indian trader John Kinzie. They married in 1830 and moved to Fort Winnebago, Wisconsin, where her husband was an Indian agent. The house they resided in for seven months [2] at the end of that time, now known as the Old Indian Agency House, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[3]

    In July, 1833 they left the area that would later become Wisconsin and moved to Chicago. Between 1833 and 1846 the couple had 7 children, 6 of which survived to adulthood. The Kinzie family was involved in Chicago’s civic and social development throughout the nineteenth century. They were active in the Episcopal church and founded the Chicago Historical Society (now the Chicago History Museum). Kinzie died in Amagansett, New York, Long Island, in 1870.

    Her granddaughter and namesake Juliette Gordon Low attained fame for founding Girl Scouting in America in 1912.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juliette_Gordon_Low

  9. Renee says:

    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~houghtonfamily/p231.htm

    Ruth Chapman
    F, #74886

    Ruth Chapman||p231.htm#i74886|Rufus Watson Chapman|b. 1854|p230.htm#i57665||||Uriah Chapman|b. bt 1807 – 1808\nd. 1 Feb 1869|p231.htm#i40722|Mariah Spencer|b. 24 Jan 1811\nd. 24 Oct 1880|p1638.htm#i40721|||||||
    Ruth Chapman was born. She is the daughter of Rufus Watson Chapman.
    Child of Ruth Chapman
    Margurite (?)+
    Ruth Chapman
    F, #74895

    Ruth Chapman||p231.htm#i74895|James C. Chapman||p230.htm#i74892||||Rufus W. Chapman|b. 1854|p230.htm#i57665||||||||||
    Ruth Chapman was born. She is the daughter of James C. Chapman.
    Samford A. Chapman
    M, #85652, b. August 1840
    Samford A. Chapman was born in August 1840 in MA, USA. He married Adalaide J. Houghton, daughter of Dr. Eli D. Houghton and Julia (?), in circa 1865. Samford A. Chapman and Adalaide J. Houghton appeared in the census of 1900 of Norwich, New London Co., CT, USA. Samford A. Chapman was the son of.
    Family: Samford A. Chapman and Adalaide J. Houghton
    Samuel Chapman
    M, #6456
    Samuel Chapman married Sarah Philinda Worden, daughter of Ansel B. Worden and Mary Houghton, in 9 April 1896.
    Family: Samuel Chapman and Sarah Philinda Worden
    Samuel Greeley Chapman
    M, #17304, b. 29 September 1929
    Samuel Greeley Chapman was born on 29 September 1929 in Atlanta, GA, USA. He married Carolyn Sue Houghton Ph.D., daughter of Eldon Eugene Houghton and Bernadine Vivian Thompson, in 1 June 1991 at Shaker Heights, OH, USA.
    Family: Samuel Greeley Chapman and Carolyn Sue Houghton Ph.D.
    Sarah Chapman
    F, #53657, b. 12 September 1872, d. 29 December 1899
    Sarah Chapman was born on 12 September 1872 in TX, USA. She married Dr. William Mortimer Houghton M.D., son of Theodore Mortimer Houghton and Annie Eliza J. Rutledge, in 15 October 1892 at Williamson Co., TX, USA. Sarah Chapman died on 29 December 1899 at Williamson Co., TX, USA. She was buried at Pond Springs Cemetary, Austin, TX, USA.
    Child of Sarah Chapman and Dr. William Mortimer Houghton M.D.
    Ira Louis Houghton+ b. 18 May 1894, d. 26 Jun 1971
    Sarah M. Chapman
    F, #74898

    Sarah M. Chapman||p231.htm#i74898|Rufus Watson Chapman|b. 1854|p230.htm#i57665||||Uriah Chapman|b. bt 1807 – 1808\nd. 1 Feb 1869|p231.htm#i40722|Mariah Spencer|b. 24 Jan 1811\nd. 24 Oct 1880|p1638.htm#i40721|||||||
    Sarah M. Chapman was born. She was the daughter of Rufus Watson Chapman. Sarah M. Chapman married Scott D. Clarke.
    Children of Sarah M. Chapman and Scott D. Clarke
    Marion Clarke+
    Carlton D. Clarke+ b. 1918
    Joseph C. Clarke+ b. 1923
    Scott Chapman
    M, #103717

    Scott Chapman||p231.htm#i103717|Leonard Ralph Chapman|b. 4 May 1929\nd. 22 Mar 2008|p230.htm#i72087|Dolores Evelyn Parker|b. 2 Jan 1929|p1478.htm#i66021|||||||Cecil G. Parker|b. 26 Feb 1900\nd. 10 Dec 1974|p1478.htm#i66019|Cynthia G. McNeely|b. 26 Apr 1897\nd. 20 Sep 1983|p1400.htm#i66020|
    Scott Chapman was born in OH, USA. He is the son of Leonard Ralph Chapman and Dolores Evelyn Parker.
    Stewart Jesse Chapman
    M, #73696, b. 1905
    Stewart Jesse Chapman was born in 1905. He married Jessie Gwendolyn Houghten, daughter of Elmer Thomas Houghten and Grace Armenia Belle Mclachlan.
    Children of Stewart Jesse Chapman and Jessie Gwendolyn Houghten
    Stewart Jesse Chapman+ b. 1928
    Peggy Chapman
    Stewart Jesse Chapman
    M, #73699, b. 1928

    Stewart Jesse Chapman|b. 1928|p231.htm#i73699|Stewart Jesse Chapman|b. 1905|p231.htm#i73696|Jessie Gwendolyn Houghten|b. 24 Sep 1905\nd. 22 Jul 1969|p587.htm#i73695|||||||Elmer T. Houghten|b. 7 Apr 1879\nd. 16 Dec 1944|p585.htm#i51560|Grace A. B. Mclachlan|b. 24 Feb 1887\nd. 17 Dec 1962|p1397.htm#i73694|
    Stewart Jesse Chapman was born in 1928. He is the son of Stewart Jesse Chapman and Jessie Gwendolyn Houghten. Stewart Jesse Chapman married Mary Coffrey.
    Children of Stewart Jesse Chapman and Mary Coffrey
    Mary Ann Chapman b. 1956
    Diane Chapman b. 1958
    Joanne Chapman b. 1958
    Kathy Ann Chapman b. 1961
    Uriah Chapman
    M, #40722, b. between 1807 and 1808, d. 1 February 1869
    Uriah Chapman was born between 1807 and 1808 in Delaware Co., NY, USA. He married Mariah Spencer, daughter of Ithamar Amos Spencer and Caroline Matilda Houghton, in 3 December 1835. Uriah Chapman died on 1 February 1869. He was the son of.
    Children of Uriah Chapman and Mariah Spencer
    David Porter Chapman b. 1840
    Leroy S. Chapman b. 1850, d. 1853
    Rufus Watson Chapman+ b. 1854
    Rufus W. Chapman b. 3 Dec 1854
    Virginia Belle Chapman
    F, #61814, b. 17 August 1918, d. 7 June 1998
    Virginia Belle Chapman was born on 17 August 1918 in Worcester, MA, USA. She married Charles A. Houghton Jr., son of Charles Alexander Houghton and Helen Mildred Williams. Virginia Belle Chapman died on 7 June 1998 at Heartland of Zephyrhills, Zephyrhills, FL, USA. She was buried on 12 June 1998 at Florida National Cemetery, Bushnell, Sumter Co., FL, USA.
    Family: Virginia Belle Chapman and Charles A. Houghton Jr.
    William Chapman
    M, #25282
    William Chapman married Lydia Hooton, daughter of Joseph Hooton and Patience Hews, in 21 April 1771 at Nantucket, Nantucket, MA, USA.
    Family: William Chapman and Lydia Hooton
    Belinda Rose Chappell
    F, #62334
    Belinda Rose Chappell married William Josiah Hobill, son of Samuel A. Hobill and Alice C. Houghton. Belinda Rose Chappell was the daughter of.
    Children of Belinda Rose Chappell and William Josiah Hobill
    Robert Hobill+ b. 26 Dec 1901, d. 20 Dec 1986
    Stella Hobill+ b. 1904
    Walter Hobill
    William Josiah Hobill Jr b. 29 Sep 1913, d. 9 Aug 1987
    Jennifer N. Chappell
    M, #102432, b. circa 1966
    Jennifer N. Chappell was born circa 1966. He married Dana A. Houghton in 20 June 1989 at El Paso Co., TX, USA.
    Family: Jennifer N. Chappell and Dana A. Houghton
    Leo Charette
    M, #43697
    Leo Charette married Evelyn Hitchman, daughter of Frank Hitchman and Leona Waters.
    Family: Leo Charette and Evelyn Hitchman
    Bernice Charlebois
    F, #86338
    Bernice Charlebois married Joseph Rossington Brown, son of Ernest William Brown and Tina Hull, in 2 October 1954 at Ottawa, Canada.
    Family: Bernice Charlebois and Joseph Rossington Brown
    Juanita Charlene
    F, #76532
    Her second marriage was to Floyd James Houghton.
    Family: Juanita Charlene and Floyd James Houghton
    Hattie Charles
    F, #51425, b. circa 1846
    Hattie Charles was born circa 1846 in MA, USA. She and Bessie Houghton appeared in the census of 1880 of Jackson Twp, Seymour, Jackson Co., IN, USA. Hattie Charles was the daughter of.
    Jonah K. Charles
    F, #95161, b. circa 1961
    Jonah K. Charles was born circa 1961. She married Douglas A. Houghton, son of (?) Smith, in 15 May 1983 at Los Angeles Co., CA, USA.
    Family: Jonah K. Charles and Douglas A. Houghton
    Neva Elizabeth Charles
    F, #26490, b. circa 1898
    Neva Elizabeth Charles was born circa 1898 in KY, USA. She married Nathaniel Braddish Houghton, son of Truman Hurlburt Houghton Sr and Julia Ardell Largett, in 15 January 1923 at Pikeville, Pike, KY, USA. Neva Elizabeth Charles and Nathaniel Braddish Houghton appeared in the census of 1930 of McPherson, McPherson Co., KS, USA. Neva Elizabeth Charles was the daughter of.
    Children of Neva Elizabeth Charles and Nathaniel Braddish Houghton
    Truman Houghton b. c 1925
    Belda Houghton b. c 1927
    Tucker Charles
    M, #89881, b. 2001

    Tucker Charles|b. 2001|p231.htm#i89881||||Jaime Jo Applegate|b. 1980|p103.htm#i89880|||||||James Applegate|b. 1946|p103.htm#i89872|Phyllis Holeman||p560.htm#i89873|
    Tucker Charles was born in 2001. He is the son of Jaime Jo Applegate.
    William Charles
    M, #83165
    Contribution: William Charles contributed the genealogy of Charles Bentley.
    William Garraway Charles
    M, #83164
    William Garraway Charles married Catherine Louise Miller, daughter of Adam Miller and Lydia Louise Heath, in 5 April 1899 at Chicago, Cook Co., IL, USA.
    Family: William Garraway Charles and Catherine Louise Miller
    Nicholas Charlet
    M, #15089
    Nicholas Charlet married Catherine (?) in before 1639.
    Family: Nicholas Charlet and Catherine (?)
    Nancy S. Charron
    F, #40193
    Nancy S. Charron married Charles Clark, son of Solomon Bradford Clark and Clarissa Houghton.
    Child of Nancy S. Charron and Charles Clark
    Herbert Clark
    Thomas Carl Charron
    M, #48415
    Thomas Carl Charron married Suzanne Coffey, daughter of John Louis Coffey and Ella Jean Wallis, in 11 November 1989 at Lake Tahoe, NV, USA.
    Family: Thomas Carl Charron and Suzanne Coffey
    Abigail Charterlow
    F, #42404
    Abigail Charterlow married Ivers Wilder, son of John Wilder and Kitty Pearson, in 15 April 1828.
    Children of Abigail Charterlow and Ivers Wilder
    George I. Wilder b. 2 May 1829
    Ursula A. Wilder b. 14 Jun 1830
    Otis D. Wilder b. 7 Jul 1831
    Mountvillro Wilder b. 10 Jun 1834
    Horace J. Wilder b. 24 Jul 1835
    Sarah H. Wilder b. 8 Oct 1837
    Harriet E. Wilder b. 13 May 1839
    Joannah M. Wilder b. 3 Apr 1841
    Daniel Wilder b. 1 Nov 1843
    Mary E. Wilder b. 15 Jun 1847
    Ruth L. Chartier
    F, #78855
    Ruth L. Chartier was born in Caanan, NH, USA. She married Michael F. Houghton, son of Dwight Evan Houghton and Norma Effie Childs, in 9 August 1967 at Hartland, VT, USA. Ruth L. Chartier was the daughter of.
    Family: Ruth L. Chartier and Michael F. Houghton
    Abagail Chase
    F, #78990

    Abagail Chase||p231.htm#i78990|Wayne F. Chase||p233.htm#i78989|Karen S. Youland|b. 28 Sep 1967|p1799.htm#i78988|||||||David R. Youland|b. 23 Jan 1938|p1799.htm#i37219|Nancy Pearl|b. 20 Jul 1939|p1488.htm#i37218|
    Abagail Chase was born. She is the daughter of Wayne F. Chase and Karen S. Youland.
    Abigail “Nabby” Chase
    F, #57798, b. 2 May 1789
    Abigail “Nabby” Chase was born on 2 May 1789 in Haverhill, MA, USA. She married Samuel Nichols, son of Samuel Nichols and Abigail Houghton, in 10 November 1816 at Halifax, Windham Co., VT, USA. Abigail “Nabby” Chase was the daughter of.
    Child of Abigail “Nabby” Chase and Samuel Nichols
    Adelia Nichols b. 19 Dec 1830, d. 20 May 1907
    Alanson Chase
    M, #25552
    Alanson Chase married Maria Harris, daughter of Sgt. Daniel Harris and Abigail Reed.
    Family: Alanson Chase and Maria Harris
    Albert Chase
    M, #5614, b. before 1889

    Albert Chase|b. b 1889|p231.htm#i5614|Henry S. Chase||p232.htm#i4632|Martha P. Ward|b. 10 Apr 1828\nd. 1889|p1726.htm#i4625|||||||Henry Ward|b. 12 May 1798\nd. 18 Nov 1864|p1726.htm#i4160|Eliza E. Houghton|b. 9 May 1798\nd. 1867|p774.htm#i4155|
    Albert Chase was born before 1889. He was the son of Henry S. Chase and Martha P. Ward.
    Albert Chase
    M, #76149, b. circa 1843
    Albert Chase was born circa 1843 in NY, USA. He married Susan Houghton, daughter of Alanson P. Houghton and Lovinda Tillatson. Albert Chase and Susan Houghton appeared in the census of 1880 of Horicon, Dodge Co., WI, USA. Albert Chase was the son of.
    Children of Albert Chase and Susan Houghton
    Willard Chase b. c 1867
    Frances Chase b. c 1869
    Harry Chase b. c 1870
    Albert E. Chase b. c 1878
    Albert E. Chase
    M, #76153, b. circa 1878

    Albert E. Chase|b. c 1878|p231.htm#i76153|Albert Chase|b. c 1843|p231.htm#i76149|Susan Houghton|b. c 1845|p1185.htm#i76148|||||||Alanson P. Houghton|b. c 1810\nd. b 1860|p618.htm#i63889|Lovinda Tillatson|b. bt 1815 – 1817|p1689.htm#i63888|
    Albert E. Chase was born circa 1878 in WI, USA. He was the son of Albert Chase and Susan Houghton. Albert E. Chase was listed in the census of Albert Chase and Susan Houghton in 1880 at Horicon, Dodge Co., WI, USA.
    Alfred B. Chase
    M, #4605, d. 1863

    Alfred B. Chase|d. 1863|p231.htm#i4605|Capt. John K. Chase|b. 30 Mar 1788\nd. 1856|p232.htm#i4157|Ruth Houghton|b. 3 Nov 1793|p1150.htm#i4151|||||||Major Edward Houghton Jr|b. 1765\nd. 20 Nov 1845|p764.htm#i3969|Ruth Bridgeman|b. 1764\nd. 28 Dec 1832|p178.htm#i3974|
    Alfred B. Chase was born. He was the son of Capt. John K. Chase and Ruth Houghton. Alfred B. Chase died in 1863 at Guilford, Windham Co., VT, USA. He was buried at Guilford Center Cemetery, Guilford, Windham Co., VT, USA.
    Child of Alfred B. Chase
    Frank E. Chase+ b. b 1863, d. 1925
    Alice Chase
    F, #41803
    Alice Chase married Leroy Brooks, son of Cyrus Houghton Brooks and Amelia J. Miles.
    Family: Alice Chase and Leroy Brooks
    Alice S. Chase
    F, #32328, b. 9 March 1897

    Alice S. Chase|b. 9 Mar 1897|p231.htm#i32328|Amos S. Chase||p231.htm#i32326|Hattie Lovina Caldwell|b. 19 Nov 1868\nd. 18 Feb 1916|p209.htm#i32325|||||||James N. Caldwell|b. 18 Aug 1825\nd. 28 Sep 1897|p209.htm#i31009|Harriet M. Sawyer|b. 6 Jul 1831\nd. 28 Sep 1886|p1583.htm#i31008|
    Alice S. Chase was born on 9 March 1897. She was the daughter of Amos S. Chase and Hattie Lovina Caldwell.
    Allen Perley Chase
    M, #72929
    Child of Allen Perley Chase and Mary Converse Dutton
    Mary Houghton Chase+
    Alonzo Chase
    M, #35435

    Alonzo Chase||p231.htm#i35435|Edward Chase|b. 29 Aug 1794\nd. 17 Oct 1880|p232.htm#i35428|Roxanne Crosby|b. 1 Mar 1793\nd. 10 Jan 1848|p277.htm#i1854|||||||Jonathan Crosby|b. 5 Feb 1762\nd. 20 Sep 1840|p277.htm#i1851|Katy Houghton|b. 1 Mar 1766\nd. 24 Mar 1854|p981.htm#i1845|
    Alonzo Chase was born. He was the son of Edward Chase and Roxanne Crosby.
    Amelia Malinda Chase
    F, #32366
    Amelia Malinda Chase married James Densmore Caldwell, son of John Caldwell and Polly French, in 14 April 1844 at Vernon, Windham Co., VT, USA.
    Family: Amelia Malinda Chase and James Densmore Caldwell
    Amos Newton Chase
    M, #32329, b. 31 July 1899

    Amos Newton Chase|b. 31 Jul 1899|p231.htm#i32329|Amos S. Chase||p231.htm#i32326|Hattie Lovina Caldwell|b. 19 Nov 1868\nd. 18 Feb 1916|p209.htm#i32325|||||||James N. Caldwell|b. 18 Aug 1825\nd. 28 Sep 1897|p209.htm#i31009|Harriet M. Sawyer|b. 6 Jul 1831\nd. 28 Sep 1886|p1583.htm#i31008|
    Amos Newton Chase was born on 31 July 1899. He was the son of Amos S. Chase and Hattie Lovina Caldwell.
    Amos S. Chase
    M, #32326
    Amos S. Chase married Hattie Lovina Caldwell, daughter of James Nelson Caldwell and Harriet Matilda Sawyer, in 20 September 1894.
    Children of Amos S. Chase and Hattie Lovina Caldwell
    Hattie Louise Chase b. 24 Sep 1895
    Alice S. Chase b. 9 Mar 1897
    Amos Newton Chase b. 31 Jul 1899
    Henry Chase b. 29 Oct 1902
    Blanche L. Chase
    F, #34905, b. 1870, d. 1955
    Blanche L. Chase was born in 1870 in NH, USA. She married Revilo Gardner Houghton, son of Alvin W. Houghton and Esther H. Runnels, in 1 June 1901 at Wolfboro, NH, USA. Blanche L. Chase and Revilo Gardner Houghton appeared in the census of 1910 of Manchester, Hillsborough Co., NH, USA. Blanche L. Chase and Revilo Gardner Houghton appeared in the census of 1920 of Wolfeboro, Carroll Co., NH, USA. Blanche L. Chase died in 1955. She was buried at South Wolfboro Cemetery, Wolfboro, NH, USA. She was the daughter of.
    Family: Blanche L. Chase and Revilo Gardner Houghton
    Caroline Maria Chase
    F, #72367
    Caroline Maria Chase first married Emory Bradford Greenleaf.
    Family: Caroline Maria Chase and Emory Bradford Greenleaf
    Carrie Belle Chase
    F, #11451, b. 25 June 1871, d. 13 March 1954

    Carrie Belle Chase|b. 25 Jun 1871\nd. 13 Mar 1954|p231.htm#i11451|Reuben C. Chase|b. 1 Feb 1835|p233.htm#i9830|Julia A. Houghton|b. 21 Dec 1842|p973.htm#i9826|||||||Madison Houghton|b. 11 Jan 1809\nd. 9 Jul 1870|p1025.htm#i8555|Sarah King|b. 7 Nov 1814|p1313.htm#i8560|
    Carrie Belle Chase was born on 25 June 1871 in Hiawatha, KS, USA. She was the daughter of Reuben C. Chase and Julia A. Houghton. Carrie Belle Chase married Harvey L. Mills in 22 June 1898 at Hiawatha, KS, USA. Carrie Belle Chase died on 13 March 1954 at Riverside Co., CA, USA.
    Children of Carrie Belle Chase and Harvey L. Mills
    Lewis Chase Mills
    Marion Mills
    Henry Lawrence Mills
    Celia Chase
    F, #65316, b. 10 August 1884, d. 22 June 1959
    Celia Chase was born on 10 August 1884 in Harrison Twp, Winnebago Co., IL, USA. She married Wilbur L. Houghton, son of Thomas Alston Houghton and Clara Maria Haughton, in 1 January 1907 at Beloit, Rock Co., WI, USA. Celia Chase and Wilbur L. Houghton appeared in the census of 1910 of Pecatonica, Winnebago Co., IL, USA. Celia Chase and Wilbur L. Houghton appeared in the census of 1930 of Harrison, Winnebago Co., IL, USA. Celia Chase died on 22 June 1959 at Durand Twp, Winnebago Co., IL, USA. She was buried on 25 June 1959 at Durand Twp, Winnebago Co., IL, USA. She was the daughter of.
    Child of Celia Chase and Wilbur L. Houghton
    Walter J. Houghton b. 29 Apr 1920, d. 7 May 1998
    Charlotte Chase
    F, #4610, b. before 1856

    Charlotte Chase|b. b 1856|p231.htm#i4610|Capt. John K. Chase|b. 30 Mar 1788\nd. 1856|p232.htm#i4157|Ruth Houghton|b. 3 Nov 1793|p1150.htm#i4151|||||||Major Edward Houghton Jr|b. 1765\nd. 20 Nov 1845|p764.htm#i3969|Ruth Bridgeman|b. 1764\nd. 28 Dec 1832|p178.htm#i3974|
    Charlotte Chase married Rev. William Barber. Charlotte Chase was born before 1856. She was the daughter of Capt. John K. Chase and Ruth Houghton.
    Family: Charlotte Chase and Rev. William Barber
    Charlotte Chase
    F, #5605, b. before 1892

    Charlotte Chase|b. b 1892|p231.htm#i5605|Capt. Henry S. Chase|d. 1892|p232.htm#i4607|Martha P. Ward|d. 1892|p1726.htm#i4613|Capt. John K. Chase|b. 30 Mar 1788\nd. 1856|p232.htm#i4157|Ruth Houghton|b. 3 Nov 1793|p1150.htm#i4151|||||||
    Charlotte Chase married Rev. William Barber. Charlotte Chase was born before 1892. She was the daughter of Capt. Henry S. Chase and Martha P. Ward.
    Family: Charlotte Chase and Rev. William Barber
    Clarence Emory Chase
    M, #11449, b. 26 July 1863

    Clarence Emory Chase|b. 26 Jul 1863|p231.htm#i11449|Reuben C. Chase|b. 1 Feb 1835|p233.htm#i9830|Julia A. Houghton|b. 21 Dec 1842|p973.htm#i9826|||||||Madison Houghton|b. 11 Jan 1809\nd. 9 Jul 1870|p1025.htm#i8555|Sarah King|b. 7 Nov 1814|p1313.htm#i8560|
    Clarence Emory Chase was born on 26 July 1863 in Chaseville, Otsego, NY, USA. He was the son of Reuben C. Chase and Julia A. Houghton. Clarence Emory Chase married Nellie Buck in 12 August 1891.
    Family: Clarence Emory Chase and Nellie Buck.

    This family goes on other posts as well:

    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2013/01/16/candy-lands/

    http://wtpotus.wordpress.com/2010/06/28/russian-spy-mission-10-arrested/

    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2013/01/03/a-little-ringing-of-bells/

    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2013/01/15/on-being-nine-2/

    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2012/12/25/middle-town/

    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2012/12/25/christmas-holiday-shopping-adventure/

    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2012/12/16/mind-games-and-staged-terror-to-disarm-with-smiles/

    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2012/12/20/szendro-hungary/

    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2012/11/27/the-king/

    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/colors-of-the-rainbow-black/

    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2012/11/17/the-bakrie-goods/

    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2012/11/13/unpaid-social-liaison-to-u-s-central-command-what-does-this-mean/

    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2012/10/08/from-russia-with-love-again/

    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2012/09/30/good-fortune-trails-of-glass-slippers/

    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2012/09/13/a-duke-and-a-king-again/

    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2012/09/16/go-ask-alice-2/

    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2012/09/21/about-trust-again/

    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2012/09/18/alphabet-soup/

  10. Renee says:

    Chapman*
    Anna Chapman
    Russian Spy Ring*

    http://wtpotus.wordpress.com/2010/06/28/russian-spy-mission-10-arrested/
    In this courtroom sketch, Anna Chapman, left, Vicky Pelaez, second from left, the defendant known as “Richard Murphy”, center, the defendant known as “Cynthia Murphy”, second from right, and the defendant known as “Juan Lazaro”, far right, are seen in Manhattan federal court in New York, Monday, June 28, 2010.

    Russia is a place that young girls dream of seeing. Troika’s, snow, fur capes and romantic castles. The things fairy tales and romance novels are made of. The problem with fairy tales is that they are fiction, and real life is different. I have covered the royals of Russia in Sandcastles, but today’s story is less glamor and more secret agent. I will connect this as it comes out.

    Russian Spy Mission; 10 Arrests. Is this from Russia with love?

    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2012/10/08/from-russia-with-love-again/

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/russian-mobster-grandpa-khasan-shot-dead-in-moscow-8454410.html

  11. Renee says:

    Sands*
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernadette_Sands_McKevitt
    Bernadette Sands McKevitt (born in November 1958[1]) is an Irish republican, and a former leading member of the 32 County Sovereignty Movement. She lived in the mainly loyalist Rathcoole area of Newtownabbey before her family were forced out of their home to live in the mainly republican West Belfast. She is the younger sister of Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) hunger striker Bobby Sands. She was unable to attend her brother Bobby Sands’ funeral because she was on the run at the time. Her husband, Michael McKevitt, was the Quartermaster General of the IRA and later a founding member of an anti-Good Friday Agreement splinter group styled by the media as the ‘Real Irish Republican Army’. Bernadette and McKevitt have three children.[2]

    [edit] References^ O’Hearn, Denis (2006). Bobby Sands: Nothing but an Unfinished Song. Pluto Books. pp. 3. ISBN 0-7453-2572-6.
    ^ Village.IE.Interview with Bernadette Sands 1 February 1998, retrieved 1 October 2008

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/32_County_Sovereignty_Movement
    32 County Sovereignty Movement

    Chairman Francis Mackey

    Founded 1997

    Political Ideology Physical force Irish republicanism
    (Linked to the Real Irish Republican Army),
    Socialism
    Colours Green

    Website 32csm.info

    See also Irish politics
    Irish political parties
    Real IRA

    McKevitt, a native of County Louth joined the Provisional IRA during the outbreak of the Troubles. In February 1975 he was shot in the knees by the Official IRA during a feud between the two organisations.[2] He was a longtime senior member of the Provisional Irish Republican Army and served as the organisation’s Quartermaster General, a role which gave him unique personal knowledge of the whereabouts of, and access to PIRA arms dumps. He quit the organisation in protest at the movement’s ceasefires and its participation through Sinn Féin in the Peace Process which led to the Good Friday Agreement. McKevitt launched a dissident offshoot of the PIRA, called the Real IRA, using guns and weaponry he as the Quartermaster General of the PIRA had known the whereabouts of and had seized.[3][4]

    McKevitt is married to Bernadette Sands McKevitt, a sister of 1981 PIRA hunger striker and MP, Bobby Sands, who died during his hunger strike.[4] Sands McKevitt was a leading member of the 32 County Sovereignty Movement and had been described in media reports as the third highest ranking Real IRA officer.[5] She left the 32 County Sovereignty Movement following the imprisonment of her husband.[6]

    [edit] Real IRA membershipMcKevitt was convicted by the Republic of Ireland’s non-jury Special Criminal Court on 6 August 2003 of two terrorist offences: “membership of an illegal organisation” (the Real IRA) and “directing terrorism” between 29 August 1999 and 23 October 2000.[7] He was the first person to be convicted of the latter offence, introduced in the aftermath of the Omagh Bombing. The prosecution case was based on the testimony of an American FBI informant, David Rupert.[8] According to information revealed in his trial, among his plans was to attempt the assassination of the then British Prime Minister Tony Blair.[9]

    Mr. Justice Richard Johnson said of McKevitt, “[t]he accused played a leading role in the organisation which he directed and induced others to join.” On 7 August 2003 he was sentenced to twenty years in prison.[8] Given all possible reductions and remission, it means that the earliest he can be released is 2016.[10]

    McKevitt appealed his convictions to the Court of Criminal Appeal, arguing that Rupert’s testimony was unreliable since he had been paid large sums of money for his role as an informant (a total of £750,000 from the FBI and MI5),[8] and because of Rupert’s long criminal record. In December 2005, the court rejected these arguments and said that Rupert was a credible witness. Both of McKevitt’s convictions were upheld. In July 2006 McKevitt was given leave to appeal to the Supreme Court.[11] The appeal was rejected on 30 July 2008.[12]

    McKevitt was expelled from the Real IRA after a disagreement between a group of Real IRA prisoners in Portlaoise Prison and the outside leadership. The prisoners issued a statement urging the leadership to stand down claiming a criminal element had taken over.[13] McKevitt and his supporters went on to form a group called The New Republican Forum.[14]

    In June 2009, McKevitt was one of four men found by a civil court to be liable for the 1998 Omagh bombing in a case taken by relatives of the victims.[15]

    Previous to his arrest and jailing, McKevitt resided at Beech Park, [[Blackrock, County Louth

    [edit] References^ Harnden, Toby (1999). Bandit Country. Hodder & Stoughton. pp. 188–189. ISBN 0-340-71736-X.
    ^ Hanley & Millar, B & S (2009). The Lost Revolution: The story of the Official IRA and the Workers Party. Ireland: Penguin Ireland. pp. 295. ISBN 978-1-84488-120-8.
    ^ McDonald, Henry (2000-11-26). “Real IRA ready to blitz Britain”. London: The Guardian. http://www.guardian.co.uk/Northern_Ireland/Story/0,,403152,00.html. Retrieved 2007-02-12.
    ^ a b Hopkins, Nick (2001-03-05). “Police fear Real IRA bomb blitz”. London: The Guardian. http://www.guardian.co.uk/Northern_Ireland/Story/0,,446578,00.html. Retrieved 2007-02-12.
    ^ “Trial told of `plot by Real IRA chief’ to kidnap peers”. The Independent. http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4158/is_20030625/ai_n12697913. Retrieved 2007-02-12.[dead link]
    ^ “The Framing of Michael McKevitt”. Marcella Sands. http://indiamond6.ulib.iupui.edu:81/MS2206062g.html. Retrieved 2007-02-12.
    ^ Cowan, Rosie (2001-03-31). “Republican dissident charged in Dublin”. London: The Guardian. http://www.guardian.co.uk/Northern_Ireland/Story/0,,466221,00.html. Retrieved 2007-02-12.
    ^ a b c “McKevitt sentenced to 20 years”. London: The Guardian. 2003-08-07. http://www.guardian.co.uk/Northern_Ireland/Story/0,,1014172,00.html. Retrieved 2007-02-12.
    ^ “Leader of Real IRA ‘gave details for Blair assassination'”. The Scotsman. http://thescotsman.scotsman.com/index.cfm?id=1117102002. Retrieved 2007-02-12.
    ^ Cowan, Rosie (2003-08-08). “Real IRA leader gets 20 years”. London: The Guardian. http://www.guardian.co.uk/Northern_Ireland/Story/0,,1014573,00.html. Retrieved 2007-02-12.
    ^ “Challenge to Real IRA conviction”. BBC News. 2006-07-17. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/northern_ireland/5187430.stm. Retrieved 2007-02-12.
    ^ “Real IRA leader to stay in jail as judges throw out appeal”. Irish Independent. 2008-07-31. http://www.independent.ie/national-news/real-ira-leader-to-stay-in-jail-as-judges-throw-out-appeal-1443742.html. Retrieved 2008-07-31.
    ^ CAIN website.
    ^ New Republican Forum
    ^ “Four found liable for Omagh bomb”. RTÉ News. 2009-06-08. http://www.rte.ie/news/2009/0608/omagh.html. Retrieved 2009-06-08.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_Sands
    Robert Gerard “Bobby” Sands (Irish: Roibeárd Gearóid Ó Seachnasaigh;[1] 9 March 1954 – 5 May 1981) was an Irish volunteer of the Provisional Irish Republican Army and member of the British Parliament who died on hunger strike while imprisoned in HM Prison Maze.

    He was the leader of the 1981 hunger strike in which Irish republican prisoners protested against the removal of Special Category Status. During his strike he was elected as a member of the British Parliament as an Anti H-Block/Armagh Political Prisoner candidate.[2][3] His death resulted in a new surge of IRA recruitment and activity. International media coverage brought attention to the hunger strikers, and the republican movement in general, attracting both praise and criticism.

    Sands was born into a Roman Catholic family[5][6] in Abbots Cross, but also lived in a house in Doonbeg Drive, Newtownabbey, County Antrim, Northern Ireland, and lived there until 1960[7] whereupon the family were forced to move to Rathcoole, Newtownabbey.[7] His first sister, Marcella, was born in April 1955 and second sister, Bernadette, in November 1958. His parents, John and Rosaleen, had another son, John, in 1962. On leaving school, Bobby became an apprentice coach-builder until he was forced out at gunpoint by loyalists.[8][9]

    In June 1972, at the age of 18, Bobby moved with his family to the Twinbrook housing estate in west Belfast, and had to leave Rathcoole due to loyalist intimidation.[9][10]

    He married Geraldine Noade. His son, Gerard, was born 8 May 1973. Noade soon left to live in England with their son.[9]

    Sands’ sister Bernadette Sands McKevitt is also a prominent Irish Republican. Along with her husband Michael McKevitt she helped to form the 32 County Sovereignty Movement and is accused of involvement with the Real Irish Republican Army.[11] Sands McKevitt is opposed to the Belfast Agreement, stating that “Bobby did not die for cross-border bodies with executive powers. He did not die for nationalists to be equal British citizens within the Northern Ireland state.”[12]

    [edit] Provisional IRA activityIn 1972, Sands joined the Provisional IRA.[13] He was arrested and charged in October 1972 with possession of four handguns found in the house where he was staying. Sands was convicted in April 1973 sentenced to five years’ imprisonment and released in April 1976.[14][15]

    On his release from prison in 1976, he returned to his family home in West Belfast, and resumed his active role in the Provisional IRA’s cause. He was charged with involvement in the October 1976 bombing of the Balmoral Furniture Company in Dunmurry, although he was never convicted of this charge, the presiding judge stating that there was no evidence to support the assertion that Sands had taken part.[16] After the bombing, Sands and at least five others were alleged to have been involved in a gun battle with the Royal Ulster Constabulary, although due to lack of evidence, Sands was not convicted. Leaving behind two of their wounded friends, Seamus Martin and Gabriel Corbett, Sands, Joe McDonnell, Seamus Finucane, and Sean Lavery tried to make their escape in a car, but were apprehended. Later, one of the revolvers used in the attack was found in the car in which Sands had been travelling.[17] His trial in September 1977 saw him being convicted of possession of firearms (the revolver from which the prosecution alleged bullets had been fired at the RUC after the bombing) and Sands was sentenced to 14 years’ imprisonment within HM Prison Maze, also known as Long Kesh.[18]

    Immediately after his sentence, he was implicated in a ruckus and spent the first 22 days on boards in Crumlin Road Prison, 15 days naked, and a No. 1 starvation diet (bread and water) every 3 days.[19]

    [edit] Long Kesh yearsIn prison, Sands became a writer both of journalism and poetry—being published in the Irish republican newspaper An Phoblacht. In late 1980 Sands was chosen as Officer Commanding of the Provisional IRA prisoners in Long Kesh, succeeding Brendan Hughes who was participating in the first hunger strike.

    Republican prisoners organised a series of protests seeking to regain their previous Special Category Status and not be subject to ordinary prison regulations. This began with the “blanket protest” in 1976, in which the prisoners refused to wear prison uniform and wore blankets instead. In 1978, after a number of attacks on prisoners leaving their cells to “slop out” (i.e., empty their chamber pots), this escalated into the “dirty protest”, wherein prisoners refused to wash and smeared the walls of their cells with excrement.[20]

    [edit] Published worksWhile in prison Sands had several letters and articles published in the Republican paper An Phoblacht (en: Republican News) under the pseudonym “Marcella”. Other writings attributed to him are: Skylark Sing Your Lonely Song [21] and One Day in My Life.[22] Sands also wrote the lyrics of “Back Home in Derry” and “McIlhatton”, which were both later recorded by Christy Moore; and he wrote “Sad Song For Susan” which was later recorded. The melody of “Back Home in Derry” was borrowed from Gordon Lightfoot’s famous 1976 song “The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald.”

    [edit] Member of ParliamentShortly after the beginning of the strike, Frank Maguire, the Independent Republican MP for Fermanagh and South Tyrone, died suddenly of a heart attack, precipitating the April 1981 by-election.

    The sudden vacancy in a seat with a nationalist majority of about five thousand was a valuable opportunity for Sands’ supporters to unite the nationalist community behind their campaign.[9] Pressure not to split the vote led other nationalist parties, notably the Social Democratic and Labour Party, to withdraw, and Sands was nominated on the label “Anti H-Block / Armagh Political Prisoner”. After a highly polarised campaign, Sands narrowly won the seat on 9 April 1981, with 30,493 votes to 29,046 for the Ulster Unionist Party candidate Harry West—and also becoming the youngest MP at the time.[23]

    Following Sands’ success, the British Government introduced the Representation of the People Act 1981 which prevents prisoners serving jail terms of more than one year in either the UK or the Republic of Ireland from being nominated as candidates in British elections.[24][25] This law was introduced so as to prevent the other hunger strikers from being elected to the British parliament.[26]

    [edit] Hunger strikeThe 1981 Irish hunger strike started with Sands refusing food on 1 March 1981. Sands decided that other prisoners should join the strike at staggered intervals in order to maximise publicity with prisoners steadily deteriorating successively over several months.

    The hunger strike centred on five demands:

    the right not to wear a prison uniform;
    the right not to do prison work;
    the right of free association with other prisoners, and to organise educational and recreational pursuits;
    the right to one visit, one letter and one parcel per week;
    full restoration of remission lost through the protest.[27]
    The significance of the hunger strike was the prisoners’ aim of being declared political prisoners (or prisoners of war) as opposed to criminals. The Washington Post, reported that the primary aim of the hunger strike was to generate international publicity.[28]

    [edit] Death
    Bobby Sands’ grave in Milltown CemeterySands died on 5 May 1981 in Maze prison hospital after 66 days of hunger-striking, aged 27.[29] The original pathologist’s report recorded Sands’ and the other hunger strikers’ causes of death as “self-imposed starvation”, later amended to simply “starvation” after protests from the dead strikers’ families.[30] The coroner recorded verdicts of “starvation, self-imposed”.[30]

    The announcement of Sands’ death prompted several days of rioting in nationalist areas of Northern Ireland. A milk deliverer and his son, Eric and Desmond Guiney, died as a result of injuries sustained when their milk float crashed after being stoned by rioters in a predominantly nationalist area of north Belfast.[31][32] Over 100,000 people lined the route of Sands’ funeral and he was buried in the ‘New Republican Plot’ alongside 76 others. Their grave is maintained and cared for by the National Graves Association, Belfast.[33] Sands was a Member of the Westminster Parliament for 25 days, though he never took his seat or the oath.

    In response to a question in the House of Commons on 5 May 1981, British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher said, “Mr. Sands was a convicted criminal. He chose to take his own life. It was a choice that his organisation did not allow to many of its victims”.[34] The official announcement of Sands’ death in the House of Commons omitted the customary expression of sense of loss and sympathy with the family of the member.[35]

    Sands was survived by his parents, siblings, and his son, Gerard.

    [edit] ReactionsEurope

    Memorial mural along Falls Road, BelfastIn Europe, there were widespread protests after Sands’ death. Five thousand Milanese students burned the Union Flag and chanted ‘Freedom for Ulster’ during a march.[4] The British Consulate at Ghent was raided.[4] Thousands marched in Paris behind huge portraits of Sands, to chants of ‘the IRA will conquer’.[4] In the Portuguese Parliament, the opposition stood for Sands.[4] In Oslo, demonstrators threw a tomato at Elizabeth II, the Queen of the United Kingdom, but missed. (The 28-year-old assailant claimed that he had not aimed for the queen, but rather for a smirking British soldier)[4] [36] In the Soviet Union, Pravda described it as ‘another tragic page in the grim chronicle of oppression, discrimination, terror, and violence’ in Ireland. Russian fans of Bobby Sands published a translation of the “Back Home In Derry” song (“На Родину в Дерри” in Russian).[4] Many French towns and cities have streets named after Sands, including in Nantes, Saint-Étienne, Le Mans, Vierzon, and Saint-Denis.[37] In the Republic of Ireland, Sands’ death led to riots and bus burning. IRA members allegedly unsuccessfully attempted to coerce proprietors of shops and other businesses into closing for a national day of mourning.[38] The West German newspaper Die Welt took a negative view of Sands.[4]

    Africa
    News of the death of Bobby Sands influenced the way in which political prisoners and the ANC in South Africa responded to their own situation, and inspired a new way of resistance.[39][40] Nelson Mandela was said to have been “directly influenced by Bobby Sands”,[39] and instigated a successful Hunger Strike on Robben Island.

    Americas
    The US media expressed a range of opinions on Sands’ death. The Boston Globe commented that “[t]he slow suicide attempt of Bobby Sands has cast his land and his cause into another downward spiral of death and despair. There are no heroes in the saga of Bobby Sands.”[41] The Chicago Tribune wrote that “Mahatma Gandhi used the hunger strike to move his countrymen to abstain from fratricide. Bobby Sands’ deliberate slow suicide is intended to precipitate civil war. The former deserved veneration and influence. The latter would be viewed, in a reasonable world, not as a charismatic martyr but as a fanatical suicide, whose regrettable death provides no sufficient occasion for killing others.”[42]

    The New York Times wrote that “Britain’s prime minister Thatcher is right in refusing to yield political status to Bobby Sands, the Irish Republican Army hunger striker,” but that by appearing “unfeeling and unresponsive” the British Government was giving Sands “the crown of martyrdom.”[43] The San Francisco Chronicle argued that political belief should not exempt activists from criminal law: “Terrorism goes far beyond the expression of political belief. And dealing with it does not allow for compromise as many countries of Western Europe and United States have learned. The bombing of bars, hotels, restaurants, robbing of banks, abductions and killings of prominent figures are all criminal acts and must be dealt with by criminal law.”[44]

    Some American critics and journalists suggested that American press coverage was a “melodrama”.[45] One journalist in particular criticised the large pro-IRA Irish-American contingent which “swallow IRA propaganda as if it were taffy,” and concluded that IRA “terrorist propaganda triumphs.”[46]

    Archbishop John R. Roach, president of the US Catholic bishops, called Sands’ death “a useless sacrifice”.[47] The Ledger of May 5, 1981 under the headline “To some he was a hero, to others a terrorist” claims that the hunger strike made Sands “a hero among Irish Republicans or Nationalists seeking the reunion of Protestant-dominated and British-ruled Northern Ireland with the predominantly Catholic Irish Republic to the south.”[48]

    The Ledger cited Sands as telling his friends: “If I die, God will understand,” and one of his last messages to them being, “Tell everyone I’ll see them somewhere, sometime.” [48]

    Some political, religious, union and fund-raising institutions chose to honour Sands. The International Longshoremen’s Association in New York announced a 24-hour boycott of British ships.[38][49] Over 1,000 people gathered in New York’s St. Patrick’s Cathedral to hear Cardinal Terence Cooke offer a Mass of reconciliation for Northern Ireland. Irish bars in the city were closed for two hours in mourning.[4] In Hartford, Connecticut a memorial was dedicated to Bobby Sands and the other hunger strikers in 1997, the only one of its kind in the United States. Set up by the Irish Northern Aid Committee and local Irish-Americans, it stands in a traffic circle known as Bobby Sands Circle at the bottom of Maple Avenue near Goodwin Park.[50]

    The New Jersey General Assembly, the lower house of the New Jersey Legislature, voted 34-29 for a resolution honouring his “courage and commitment.”[4]

    In 2001, a memorial to Sands and the other hunger strikers was unveiled in Havana, Cuba.[51]

    Asia and the Middle East
    In Tehran, Iran, President Abolhassan Bani-Sadr sent a message of condolence to the Sands family.[52] The government renamed Winston Churchill Boulevard, the location of the Embassy of the United Kingdom in Tehran, to Bobby Sands Street, prompting the embassy to move its entrance door to Ferdowsi Avenue to avoid using Bobby Sands Street on its letterhead.[53] A street in the Elahieh district is also named after Sands.[54] An official blue and white street sign was affixed to the rear wall of the British embassy compound saying (in Persian) “Bobby Sands Street” with three words of explanation “militant Irish guerrilla”.[52][55] The official Pars news agency called Bobby Sands’ death “heroic”.[52] There have subsequently been claims that the British foreign secretary has pressured Iranian authorities to change the name of Bobby Sands Street but this is denied.[56][57][58] A burger bar in Tehran is named in honour of Sands[59][60].
    In Israel/Palestine, Palestinian prisoners incarcerated in the Israeli desert prison of Nafha sent a letter, which was smuggled out and reached Belfast in July, 1981, which read;
    “To the families of Bobby Sands and his martyred comrades. We, revolutionaries of the Palestinian people…extend our salutes and solidarity with you in the confrontation against the oppressive terrorist rule enforced upon the Irish people by the British ruling elite. We salute the heroic struggle of Bobby Sands and his comrades, for they have sacrificed the most valuable possession of any human being. They gave their lives for freedom.”

    The Hindustan Times said Margaret Thatcher had allowed a fellow Member of Parliament to die of starvation, an incident which had never before occurred “in a civilised country.”[4]
    In the Indian Parliament, opposition members in the upper house Rajya Sabha stood for a minute’s silence in tribute. The ruling Congress Party did not join in.[4] Protest marches were organized against the British government and in tribute to Sands and his fellow hunger strikers.[61]
    The Hong Kong Standard said it was ‘sad that successive British governments have failed to end the last of Europe’s religious wars.'[4]
    A large monument dedicated to Irish protagonists for independence from Britain, including Bobby Sands, stands in the Waverley Cemetery in Sydney, Australia.
    United Kingdom
    At Old Firm football matches in Glasgow, Scotland, some Rangers fans have been known to sing songs mocking Bobby Sands to taunt fans of Celtic. Rangers fans are mainly Protestant, and predominantly sympathetic to the Unionist and Loyalist community; Celtic fans are traditionally more likely to support the Nationalist and Republican community.[62] Celtic fans regularly sing the republican song “The Roll of Honour” which commemorates the ten men who died in the 1981 hunger strike, amongst other songs in support of the IRA. Sands is honoured in the line “They stood beside their leader – the gallant Bobby Sands.” Rangers’ taunts have since been adopted by the travelling support of other UK clubs, particularly those with strong British ties, as a form of anti-Irish sentiment.[63] The 1981 British Home Championship football tournament was cancelled following the refusal of teams from England and Wales to travel to Northern Ireland in the aftermath of his death due to security concerns.

    Cardinal Basil Hume, the head of the Catholic Church in England and Wales, condemned Sands, describing the hunger strike as a form of violence. However he noted that this was his personal view. The Roman Catholic Church’s official stance was that ministrations should be provided to the hunger strikers who, believing their sacrifice to be for a higher good, were acting in good conscience.[48]

    [edit] Political impactNine other IRA and Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) members who were involved in the 1981 Irish Hunger Strike died after Sands. On the day of Sands’ funeral, Unionist leader Ian Paisley held a memorial service outside of Belfast city hall to commemorate the victims of the IRA.[38] In the Irish general elections held the same year, two anti H-block candidates won seats on an abstentionist basis.

    The media coverage that surrounded the death of Sands resulted in a new surge of IRA activity and an immediate escalation in the Troubles, with the group obtaining many more members and increasing its fund-raising capability. Both nationalists and unionists began to harden their attitudes and move towards political extremes.[64] Sands’ Westminster seat was taken by his election agent, Owen Carron standing as ‘Anti H-Block Proxy Political Prisoner’ with an increased majority.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brendan_McFarlane
    McFarlane was brought up in a strongly religious Catholic family in the republican Ardoyne area of North Belfast. He served as an altar boy at the local church, and at the age of 17 joined a missionary school in Wales, where he began his training to become a priest.[1][2] McFarlane joined the Provisional IRA when he was 18 years old. This was in the summer of 1969 shortly after the religious/political conflict known as The Troubles had broken out in the North and he witnessed the violent disturbances first-hand.[1]

    [edit] Bayardo Bar attackMain article: Bayardo Bar attack
    In 1976 McFarlane was sentenced to life imprisonment in connection with a gun and bomb attack on the Bayardo Bar on Aberdeen Street in the Protestant Shankill Road district of Belfast that killed five people (three men and two women) and injured 60 more. This had taken place on 13 August 1975.[3] In a 1995 House of Lords debate, Gerry Fitt, formerly nationalist MP for West Belfast, alleged that McFarlane had machine-gunned three pedestrians who were passing by the Bayardo as it was blown up.[4] The bar was attacked because it was allegedly frequented by member of the loyalist Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF). The IRA initially denied it had carried out the attack.[5] The attack occurred against a background of severe sectarian violence. The IRA killed 91 Protestant civilians in similar attacks in 1974-76, in reprisal for loyalist attacks on Catholics, which killed 250 civilians in the same period.[6]

    According to journalist Peter Taylor the attack was carried out by the IRA in retaliation for the UVF’s ambush of the Dublin-based The Miami Showband on 31 July 1975 which had resulted in the shooting deaths of three bandmembers.[7] One of the five people killed in the Bayardo attack was UVF man, Hugh Harris.[8]

    [edit] Maze Prison – hunger strikes and escapeMcFarlane attempted to escape from the Maze Prison dressed as a priest in 1978. When the bid failed, McFarlane’s Special Category Status was withdrawn, and he joined the dirty protest in the H-blocks.[2]

    His nickname “Bik” was acquired due to his habit of taking down notes during IRA meetings inside the Maze.[2] Fellow prisoner and author of Blanketmen: An Untold Story of the H-Block Hunger Strike, Richard O’Rawe described McFarlane as “six feet tall and full of bonhomie”, a “great singer” possessing a “striking character”. O’Rawe also maintained that McFarlane was an avid supporter of Gaelic football.[1]

    He was Provisional IRA Officer Commanding in the Maze during the 1981 Irish hunger strike in which 10 republicans died. He took over from Bobby Sands in March 1981. Asked why, Sands is said to have replied: “Because you will let me die.” He later described 1981 as, “probably the worst year of my life. Despite the political gains, the loss of that year is always with me.”[5]

    McFarlane went on to lead the Maze Prison escape, the mass breakout of 38 republican prisoners from the Maze in 1983 in which a prison officer died of a heart attack. Fifteen IRA men were caught in the vicinity of the prison, four were captured later that day, 19 got away, with three never being recaptured. Immediately following the escape, McFarlane and other prisoners commandeered a remote farmhouse near Dromore, County Down and held the family inside hostage.[2] Although he took a map and compass, and other items from the premises, none of the family members, which included two small children and a baby, were harmed.[2] He and the other former escapees made their way across the Republic of Ireland border and went on the run.[2]

    [edit] Tidey kidnappingAfter the break-out, McFarlane resumed his IRA activities. In December 1983, he is alleged to have kidnapped supermarket executive Don Tidey in a bid to ransom him to raise money for the IRA. The kidnap was one of spate of kidnappings and robberies ordered by the IRA Army Council in the early 1980s to raise funds.[9] Tidey was taking his 13-year-old daughter to school when he stopped at what he believed to be a Garda checkpoint. A gun was put to his head and he was bundled into a waiting car. A few days later his photograph was sent to Associated British Foods, and this was followed by a phone call demanding a IR£5 million ransom.[2]

    The Gardaí eventually tracked Tidey and his kidnappers — four in all — to Derrada Wood in Ballinamore, County Leitrim on 16 December 1983. In the subsequent shoot-out, a trainee garda and an Irish Army soldier (Gary Sheehan and Patrick Kelly) were killed. Tidey’s kidnappers escaped.

    On 16 January 1986, McFarlane was recaptured in the Netherlands along with fellow escapee Gerry Kelly, and subsequently extradited to Northern Ireland, and released on parole from the Maze in 1997.[10][11][12] By 1993 he had become the longest serving prisoner in the Maze.[13]

    [edit] Kidnapping chargesIn 1998, McFarlane was first charged in the Republic of Ireland with Tidey’s kidnapping, but he challenged this on the basis that Gardaí had lost a number of exhibits containing fingerprints — the central evidence in the case. The Irish Supreme Court ruled in March 2006 that the trial could proceed.[14]

    The Gardaí based the Tidey charges on items recovered from the kidnap site, including a milk carton and a plastic container, on which fingerprints were discovered. Although the items went missing from Garda headquarters during renovation work, the fingerprints had been photographed and a forensic analysis done.

    McFarlane was due to stand trial on 3 October 2006. However his legal team launched a second judicial review in May 2006, on the grounds that McFarlane could not get a fair trial due to “systematic delays in bringing the prosecution”.[15] This held up his trial until the Irish High Court ruled on the issue on 8 December 2006. However, McFarlane’s representatives appealed this decision in turn. Their appeal was finally dismissed on March 6, 2008,[16] and the trial opened in Dublin on 11 June 2008[17] only to collapse on 26 June when the Garda evidence was ruled inadmissible.[18]

    In September 2010 McFarlane was awarded compensation following a European Court of Human Rights ruling. The court found the proceedings relating to the kidnapping of supermarket executive Don Tidey had been “unreasonably long”. The Irish government was ordered to pay 5,400 euros in damages within three months and 10,000 euros in legal costs.[19]

    [edit] Recent activitiesAccording to Henry McDonald of the Observer, McFarlane was part of the IRA delegation that met with the Provisional IRA South Armagh Brigade in August 2004 to discuss Gerry Adams’ remarks that the IRA might disband to prevent it being used as an excuse to delay a power-sharing agreement which would include republicans.[20]

    He is now a member of Coiste na n-Iarchimí (“the Ex-Prisoners’ Committee”) – a welfare organisation for republican ex-prisoners.[21]

    The political wing of the Provisional republican movement, Sinn Féin, describes him as a voluntary worker, and he has been a vocal supporter of the party’s political stance, appearing beside both Gerry Adams and Gerry Kelly at rallies and reiterating former prisoners’ support for the direction the party is taking.

    McFarlane has formed a band, Tuan, which is a regular on the Irish republican entertainment circuit. He also performs quite regularly in the Hatfield House, a popular bar in the Holylands district of Belfast.[22]

    MacFarlane has also shown solidarity with the radical Basque nationalist movement and has been interviewed in the Basque and Spanish press on the subject of the Basque peace process and the proposed release of ETA prisoners. He has described the ETA prisoners as having been engaged in a, ‘legitimate struggle’ similar to that of Irish republicans.[23]

    He lives in Belfast and is the father of three children

    • Renee says:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Associated_British_Foods
      Associated British Foods plc (LSE: ABF) is a British multinational food processing and retailing company whose headquarters are in London, United Kingdom. Its ingredients division is the world’s second-largest producer of both sugar and baker’s yeast and a major producer of other ingredients including emulsifiers, enzymes and lactose.[2] Its grocery division is a major manufacturer of both branded and private label grocery products and includes the brands Mazola, Ovaltine, Ryvita, Jordans and Twinings.[2] Its retail division, Primark, has around 200 stores with over 6,500,000 sq ft (600,000 m2) of selling space across Austria, Belgium, Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and the UK.[2]

      Associated British Foods is listed on the London Stock Exchange and is a constituent of the FTSE 100 Index.

      The company was founded by Canadian Willard Garfield Weston in 1935, initially as Food Investments Limited, with the name changing to Allied Bakeries Limited a month later.[3] In 1960 the name was changed again to Associated British Foods. In 1963 the Company acquired Fine Fare, a leading British supermarket chain.[4] Following the death of the founder in 1978, control of the company was passed on to his son Garry, while the North American operations fell to his son Galen. While Garry maintained the company’s prominence in the European foods market, ABF’s growth has been eclipsed by the phenomenal performance of George Weston Limited in North America.

      The company sold Fine Fare in 1986 and in 1991 went on to acquire British Sugar.[5] In 1997 ABF sold its retail operations in Northern Ireland and the Republic to Tesco.[6] These businesses were: Quinnsworth and Crazy Prices in the Republic of Ireland and Stewarts Supermarkets Ltd and Crazy Prices in Northern Ireland, the Stewarts Winebarrel off-licence chain, Lifestyle Sports & Leisure Ltd (a retail sports and leisure business), Kingsway Fresh Foods (a meat processing facility) and Daily Wrap Produce (a fruit and vegetable packaging plant).

      In 2000 the company sold its interests in Burton’s Biscuits.[7] In 2004 it acquired the Tone’s spice business and Fleischman yeast business from Burns Philp[8] and in 2007 it purchased Patak’s Indian food business.[9]

      On 26 March 2011 Associated British Foods, and its parent company Wittington Investments, were targeted over tax avoidance by UK Uncut during anti-cuts protests.[10] The tax avoidance scheme involved moving capital between ABF/Primark and the affiliated Luxembourg entity ABF European Holdings & Co SNC by means of interest-free loans, avoiding tax of about £9.7 million per year.[11][12] The protest took the form of a mass sit-in in Fortnum & Mason.[13]

      [edit] Operations[edit] BrandsArgo cornstarch
      Allinson
      Capullo
      Dromedary cake mixes
      Fleischmann’s
      Karo corn syrup
      Kingsmill bread
      Kingsmill bread has been temporarily renamed Queensmill during the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II of Great Britain[14]
      Mazola corn oil
      Ovaltine (except in the United States, where Nestlé owns the brand)
      Patak’s
      Ryvita
      Silver Spoon
      Sunblest
      Spice Islands
      Tone’s Spices
      Twinings
      [edit] SubsidiariesAB Mauri
      AB Agri Ltd
      Abitec Corporation
      Abitec Ltd
      ACH Food Companies (AC HUMKO from 1995 to 2000), an American subsidiary of Associated British Foods, previously part of Kraft Foods from 1952 to 1995.
      Allied Mills
      British Sugar
      Frontier (50% joint venture with Cargill)
      George Weston Foods
      G Costa: sauces and ethnic (non-UK) brands
      Illovo Sugar
      Primark – known as Penneys in the Republic of Ireland
      Westmill Foods
      [edit] Controlling shareholderSome 54.5% of ABF is owned by Wittington Investments.[15] 79.2% of the share capital of Wittington Investments is owned by the Garfield Weston Foundation, which is one of the UK largest grant-making charitable trusts, and the remainder is owned by members of the Weston family. Wittington Investments also owns Fortnum & Mason and Heal & Son. George G. Weston became chief executive of ABF on 1 April 2005, and Galen Weston, the chief executive of George Weston Ltd., is a non-executive director. Garth Weston is Regional President of AB Mauri.

      [edit] See also Companies portal
      Biobutanol

      Industry Food processing
      Retail
      Founded 1935
      Headquarters London, United Kingdom
      Key people Martin G Adamson (Chairman)
      George G. Weston (CEO)
      Products Food, ingredients
      Services Retailing
      Revenue £11.065 billion (2011)[1]
      Operating income £842 million (2011)[1]
      Profit £577 million (2011)[1]
      Employees 102,000 (2011)[1]
      Subsidiaries British Sugar, Primark

      • Renee says:

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jana_Khayat
        Jana Khayat serves on the board of the department store Fortnum & Mason.[1]

        The third child of Garry Weston, billionaire chairman of Associated British Foods, Jana graduated from Oxford University with a history degree before joining the Fortnum & Mason management team. Since the death of their father, Jana’s brothers George and Guy have run Associated British Foods and Wittington Investments Ltd. (the parent company of Fortnums’s and ABF) respectively while Khayat control of Fortnum’s aided by her younger sister, Kate Hobhouse, as a non-executive director.

        Khayat served as chairman until July 2008.[2]

        She and her husband, Antoine Khayat, have three children: George, Hamish and Helena.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fortnum_%26_Mason

        Fortnum & Mason (colloquially often shortened to just “Fortnum’s”) is a department store situated in central London, with two other branches in Japan. Its headquarters is located at 181 Piccadilly, where it was established in 1707 by William Fortnum and Hugh Mason. It is privately owned by Wittington Investments Ltd.

        Fortnum and Mason is recognised internationally for its high quality goods and as an iconic British symbol. It has held many Royal Warrants over the past 150 years.

        Founded as a grocery store, Fortnum’s reputation was built on supplying quality food, and saw rapid growth throughout the Victorian era. Though Fortnum’s developed into a department store, it continues to focus on stocking a variety of exotic, speciality and also ‘basic’ provisions.[1]

        The store has since opened several other departments, such as the Gentlemen’s department on the top floor. It is also the location of a celebrated tea shop and several restaurants.

        Fortnum & Mason (colloquially often shortened to just “Fortnum’s”) is a department store situated in central London, with two other branches in Japan. Its headquarters is located at 181 Piccadilly, where it was established in 1707 by William Fortnum and Hugh Mason. It is privately owned by Wittington Investments Ltd.

        Fortnum and Mason is recognised internationally for its high quality goods and as an iconic British symbol. It has held many Royal Warrants over the past 150 years.

        Founded as a grocery store, Fortnum’s reputation was built on supplying quality food, and saw rapid growth throughout the Victorian era. Though Fortnum’s developed into a department store, it continues to focus on stocking a variety of exotic, speciality and also ‘basic’ provisions.[1]

        The store has since opened several other departments, such as the Gentlemen’s department on the top floor. It is also the location of a celebrated tea shop and several restaurants.

  12. Renee says:

    Also see:
    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2013/03/02/the-golf-club/
    And connections to:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Hampton
    Also see:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hampton_University

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Royal_Bank_of_Scotland
    The Royal Bank of Scotland plc (Scottish Gaelic: Banca Rìoghail na h-Alba, Scots: Ryal Baunk o Scotland)[1] is one of the retail banking subsidiaries of the The Royal Bank of Scotland Group plc, and together with NatWest and Ulster Bank, provides branch banking facilities throughout the British Isles. The Royal Bank of Scotland has around 700 branches, mainly in Scotland though there are branches in many larger towns and cities throughout England and Wales. The Royal Bank of Scotland and its parent, The Royal Bank of Scotland Group, are completely separate from the fellow Edinburgh based bank, the Bank of Scotland, which pre-dates The Royal Bank of Scotland by 32 years. The Bank of Scotland was effective in raising funds for the Jacobite Rebellion and as a result, The Royal Bank of Scotland was established to provide a bank with strong Hanoverian and Whig ties.

    The bank traces its origin to the Society of the Subscribed Equivalent Debt, which was set up by investors in the failed Company of Scotland to protect the compensation they received as part of the arrangements of the 1707 Acts of Union. The “Equivalent Society” became the “Equivalent Company” in 1724, and the new company wished to move into banking. The British government received the request favourably as the “Old Bank”, the Bank of Scotland, was suspected of having Jacobite sympathies. Accordingly, the “New Bank” was chartered in 1727 as the Royal Bank of Scotland, with Archibald Campbell, Lord Ilay, appointed its first governor.

    On 31 May 1728, the Royal Bank of Scotland invents the overdraft, one of the most versatile and imaginative innovations in modern banking. It allows a William Hogg, merchant in the High Street Edinburgh, to take out of his account up to £1000 (£65,449 in today’s value) more than he has in it.

    [edit] Competition with the Bank of ScotlandCompetition between the Old and New Banks was fierce and centred on the issue of banknotes. The policy of the Royal Bank was to either drive the Bank of Scotland out of business, or take it over on favourable terms.

    The Royal Bank built up large holdings of the Bank of Scotland’s notes, which it acquired in exchange for its own notes, then suddenly presented to the Bank of Scotland for payment. To pay these notes, the Bank of Scotland was forced to call in its loans and, in March, 1728, to suspend payments. The suspension relieved the immediate pressure on the Bank of Scotland at the cost of substantial damage to its reputation, and gave the Royal Bank a clear space to expand its own business—although the Royal Bank’s increased note issue also made it more vulnerable to the same tactics.

    Despite talk of a merger with the Bank of Scotland, the Royal Bank did not possess the wherewithal to complete the deal. By September, 1728, the Bank of Scotland was able to start redeeming its notes again, with interest, and in March, 1729, it resumed lending. To prevent similar attacks in the future, the Bank of Scotland put an “option clause” on its notes, giving it the right to make the notes interest-bearing while delaying payment for six months; the Royal Bank followed suit. Both banks eventually decided that the policy they had followed was mutually self-destructive and a truce was arranged, but it still took until 1751 before the two banks agreed to accept each other’s notes.

    [edit] Scottish expansionThe bank opened its first branch office outside Edinburgh in 1783 when it opened one in Glasgow. Further branches were opened in Dundee, Rothesay, Dalkeith, Greenock, Port Glasgow, and Leith in the first part of the nineteenth century.

    In 1821, the bank moved from its original head office in Edinburgh’s Old Town to Dundas House, on St. Andrew Square in the New Town. The building as seen along George Street forms the eastern end of the central vista in New Town. It was designed for Sir Lawrence Dundas by Sir William Chambers as a Palladian mansion, completed in 1774. An axial banking hall (Telling Room) behind the building, designed by John Dick Peddie, was added in 1857; it features a domed roof, painted blue internally, with gold star-shaped coffers.[2] The banking hall continues in use as a branch of the bank, and Dundas House remains the registered head office of the bank to this day.

    The rest of the nineteenth century saw the bank pursue mergers with other Scottish banks, chiefly as a response to failing institutions. The assets and liabilities of the Western Bank were acquired following its collapse in 1857; the Dundee Banking Company was acquired in 1864. By 1910, the Royal Bank of Scotland had 158 branches and around 900 staff.

    In 1969, the bank merged with the National Commercial Bank of Scotland to become the largest clearing bank in Scotland.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archibald_Campbell,_3rd_Duke_of_Argyll

    Born in Petersham, Surrey, he supported his brother, John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll (on many topics, most notably the Act of Union), earning him the title of Earl of Ilay in 1706. His military career, which was less successful than his brother’s, was somewhat distinguished. He obtained the Colonelcy of the newly formed 36th Regiment of Foot in 1701 and assisted his brother at the 1715 Battle of Sheriffmuir. Four years earlier, he had been appointed to the Privy Council. Many called him the “most powerful man in Scotland”, at least until the era of Henry Dundas.

    Lord Ilay was one of the founders of the Royal Bank of Scotland in 1727, and acted as the bank’s first governor. His portrait has appeared on the front of all Royal Bank of Scotland banknotes, and as a watermark on the notes, since they were redesigned in 1987. The portrait is based on a painting by Allan Ramsay, in the Scottish National Portrait Gallery.

    He succeeded his brother to the title of Duke of Argyll in October 1743. He worked on Inveraray Castle, his brother’s estate, which was finished in the 1750s; however, he never lived in it, and he died in 1761. He was married to Anne Whitfield about 1712, but had no legitimate male issue at his death. In his will, he left his English property to his mistress Ann (née Shireburn) Williams. His titles passed to his cousin, the son of his father’s brother John Campbell of Mamore.

    The London private bank of Williams Deacon & Co can date its history back to 1771 when the partnership of Raymond, Williams, Vere, Lowe and Fletcher was first recorded. It ceased payment in 1825 and was reconstituted with different shareholders as Williams, Deacon, Labouchere & Co, before finally becoming Williams Deacon in 1882. It was acquired by the Manchester & Salford Bank in 1890.[4]

    The Manchester & Salford Bank was founded in 1836 as a joint stock bank and became a substantial force in Lancashire banking and by 1890 it had over 45 branches. In that year it acquired Williams Deacon, primarily to obtain the latter’s seat on the London Clearing House. The registered office was moved to London but the head office remained in Manchester. The Bank also changed its name to Williams Deacon & Manchester & Salford Bank, shortened to Williams Deacon’s Bank in 1901.

    The enlarged Bank continued to expand but its commitment to the declining cotton industry after WW I stretched its own finances and, encouraged by the Bank of England, Williams Deacon’s was acquired by the Royal Bank of Scotland in 1930.[4]

    [edit] Glyn, Mills & Co.
    An early Williams & Glyn’s Automated Teller Machine.Glyn, Mills & Co. was founded as the private bank, Vere, Glyn & Hallifax, in the City of London in 1753 by Joseph Vere, Richard Glyn and Thomas Hallifax. The Vere family interest ended in 1766; William Mills joined in 1772; and when the last of the Hallifaxes departed in 1851 the Bank became known as Glyn, Mills & Company.

    Acquisitions included Currie’s in 1864, Holt & Co in 1923 and Child & Co. in 1924. Child & Company, founded in the 1580s, remains part of RBS Group Wealth Management today.[5] In 1923, it also acquired the private military bank Holt & Company, founded in 1809, which continued to trade separately until merged into the Drummonds Bank business in 1992.[6][7]

    In 1939, the bank was purchased by Royal Bank of Scotland, which became known as the Three Banks Group.[8]

    He was the first cousin once removed of Lord William Campbell.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Williams_and_Glyn%27s_Bank
    Williams & Glyn’s Bank Limited was established in London in 1970, when the Royal Bank of Scotland merged its two subsidiaries in England and Wales, Williams Deacon’s Bank Ltd. and Glyn, Mills & Co.[2] In 1985, Williams & Glyn’s was fully absorbed into the Royal Bank of Scotland Plc and ceased to trade separately.

    The London private bank of Williams Deacon & Co can date its history back to 1771 when the partnership of Raymond, Williams, Vere, Lowe and Fletcher was first recorded. It ceased payment in 1825 and was reconstituted with different shareholders as Williams, Deacon, Labouchere & Co, before finally becoming Williams Deacon in 1882. It was acquired by the Manchester & Salford Bank in 1890.[4]

    The Manchester & Salford Bank was founded in 1836 as a joint stock bank and became a substantial force in Lancashire banking and by 1890 it had over 45 branches. In that year it acquired Williams Deacon, primarily to obtain the latter’s seat on the London Clearing House. The registered office was moved to London but the head office remained in Manchester. The Bank also changed its name to Williams Deacon & Manchester & Salford Bank, shortened to Williams Deacon’s Bank in 1901.

    The enlarged Bank continued to expand but its commitment to the declining cotton industry after WW I stretched its own finances and, encouraged by the Bank of England, Williams Deacon’s was acquired by the Royal Bank of Scotland in 1930.[4]

    [edit] Glyn, Mills & Co.
    An early Williams & Glyn’s Automated Teller Machine.Glyn, Mills & Co. was founded as the private bank, Vere, Glyn & Hallifax, in the City of London in 1753 by Joseph Vere, Richard Glyn and Thomas Hallifax. The Vere family interest ended in 1766; William Mills joined in 1772; and when the last of the Hallifaxes departed in 1851 the Bank became known as Glyn, Mills & Company.

    Acquisitions included Currie’s in 1864, Holt & Co in 1923 and Child & Co. in 1924. Child & Company, founded in the 1580s, remains part of RBS Group Wealth Management today.[5] In 1923, it also acquired the private military bank Holt & Company, founded in 1809, which continued to trade separately until merged into the Drummonds Bank business in 1992.[6][7]

    In 1939, the bank was purchased by Royal Bank of Scotland, which became known as the Three Banks Group.[8]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Richard_Glyn,_1st_Baronet,_of_Ewell
    Sir Richard Glyn, 1st Baronet (13 June 1711 – 1 January 1773) was a British banker and politician.

    Together with Joseph Vere and Thomas Hallifax he founded the bank of Vere, Glyn & Hallifax, which evolved into Williams & Glyn’s Bank.

    He served as Sheriff of London in 1753 and as Lord Mayor of London in 1758. He was also Member of Parliament for the City of London from 1758 to 1768 and for Coventry from 1768 to 1773. In 1758 he was created a baronet, of Ewell in the County of Surrey.

    Glyn married firstly Susannah (née Lewen) in 1736. After her death in 1751 he married secondly Elizabeth (née Carr) in 1754. Glyn died in January 1773, aged 61, and was succeeded in the baronetcy by his son from his first marriage, George. His son from his second marriage, Richard, was created a baronet in his own right in 1800.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ameritrust_Tower

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glyn,_Mills_%26_Co.

    In 2000, the Royal Bank of Scotland Group acquired National Westminster Bank in a hostile takeover.[12] In 2009 it was announced that all 311 Royal Bank branches in England and Wales together with the seven Scottish branches of NatWest were to be divested by the troubled group, possibly under the dormant Williams & Glyn’s brand, to comply with European Union state aid requirements.[13][14] The process was expected to take up to four years to complete.[15][16][17][18]

    In March 2010, it was reported that the group had issued a sales memorandum for the business, which would include 318 branches and around £20 billion in loans provided to small businesses and households. Following the deadline for initial bids on 7 April, Banco Santander, Virgin Money, National Australia Bank, BBVA and the private equity firm JC Flowers were all confirmed to have submitted bids for consideration.[19] It was announced on 3 August that the Spanish Santander Group would pay around £1.65 billion for the branches, expected to be rebranded as part of Santander UK, in a deal set to be completed by December 2013.[20] This deal has now fallen through.

    Glyn Mills & Co was founded in London in 1753 under the name Vere, Glyn & Hallifax. Joseph Vere was an experienced banker who was a member of the Goldsmiths Company and had been involved with earlier banking partnerships; Richard Glyn had been a prominent London drysalter with widespread merchanting connections; and Thomas Hallifax was the son of a Barnsley clockmaker who had become chief clerk at Martins Bank. Unlike many of the private London banks that relied on wealthy and titled customers, Glyn, Mills was originally a commercial institution; railway companies, the Sun Insurance and the Hudson’s Bay Company were leading customers.[1]

    Vere died in 1766 leaving Glyn and Hallifax as partners; they traded satisfactorily until the financial panic of 1772 when the Bank had to stop payment for some weeks and narrowly avoided bankruptcy. One of those who provided temporary finance for the Bank was Sir John Salter, one-time Lord Mayor of London, but only on condition that his son-in-law, William Mills, could enter the partnership. When the Bank reopened it did so as Glyn, Hallifax and Mills. It was still of modest size: the number of staff was no more than 7 in 1790 but over the next 40 years it rose to 51. The last Hallifax family member in the Bank died in 1850 and the bank became Glyn, Mills & Co.[1]

    [edit] Acquisition of Currie’sConscious of the need to enlarge its financial resources, in 1864 the Bank acquired another London private bank, Currie’s, and the firm became known as Glyn, Mills, Currie & Co – a name that was maintained until 1923. The ownership of the Bank was determined by family group and not individuals: the Glyn and Mills families were entitled to two-fifths each and the Currie family, one-fifth. Two years later, in 1866, a group of Scottish banks agreed to purchase half the capital of Glyn Mills in order to obtain a seat in the London Clearing House but the collapse of Overend Gurney prevented the implementation of the deal.[1]

    In 1885, Glyn, Mills took the unprecedented step for a private bank of producing half-yearly balance sheets. It showed that the Bank’s was larger than popularly realised, “only rivalled by two or three of the largest joint-stock banks”.[1] The Bank’s size and prestige was demonstrated by the collapse of Barings Bank in 1890. Betrand Currie led the investigation into Barings’ affairs at the instigation of the Bank of England and was the largest contributor outside the Bank of England to the rescue fund, undertaking to contribute £500,000 provided that Rothschilds did the same.[2]

    [edit] Acquisition of Holt’s and Child’sFaced with the growing power of the “big five” banks after World War I Glyn Mills made its own acquisitions – Holt & Co in 1923 (briefly becoming Glyn, Mills Currie Holt & Co) and Child & Co in 1924 when the name reverted to Glyn Mills & Co. Holt’s were army agents in Whitehall which in turn supported a private banking business. It was founded in 1809 by William Kirkland who opened an office in St James’s. Regiments were gradually added to Holt’s portfolio and the Navy agency of Woodhead and Co was absorbed in 1915.[3]

    Child’s history predated that of the Bank of England and for over 100 years it had been owned by the Earl of Jersey. Following the death of Lord Jersey, the executors were told that the Bank of England would not permit a sale to one of the Big Five. “Glyn’s, the largest private bank and the sole survivor of the private banks in the Clearing House, seemed the most desirable association.[1]

    [edit] Purchased by Royal Bank of ScotlandThe approach of World War II threatened the viability of the private bank with the prospect of casualties and death duties straining capital resources. In 1939 the partners agreed to the Bank’s sale to the Royal Bank of Scotland. Glyn, Mills continued to trade separately, even to the point of acquiring the banking businesses of the British Overseas Bank and Anglo-International Bank in 1944, and of A Ruffer & Sons in 1946. However, in 1969 The Royal Bank of Scotland was restructured and the holding company’s subsidiaries in England and Wales (Glyn, Mills & Co, Williams Deacon’s Bank, and the English and Welsh branches of The National Bank) were merged to form Williams & Glyn’s Bank.[4]

    ^ a b c d e Roger Fulford Glyn’s 1753-1953 (1953)
    ^ Philip Ziegler: The Sixth Great Power Barings 1762-1929 (1988). ISBN 0-00-217508-8, pp244-54
    ^ Eric Gore Browne Glyn, Mills & Co (1933)
    ^ Glyn, Mills & Co, London, 1753-1970 The Royal Bank of Scotland Group, Heritage Archives

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_%26_Co

    Child & Co. is a formerly independent private bank that is now a separate wholly owned subsidiary and branch or brand of the Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) Group.[1] is based at 1 Fleet Street in the City of London. It is authorised by the Financial Services Authority as a brand of the Royal Bank of Scotland for regulatory compliance purposes.[2]

    Child & Co. was one of the oldest independent financial institutions in the UK, and can trace its roots back to a London goldsmith business in the late 17th century. Francis Child established his business as a goldsmith in 1664, when he entered into partnership with Robert Blanchard. Child married Blanchard’s stepdaughter and inherited the whole business on Blanchard’s death. Renamed Child and Co, the business thrived, and was appointed the “jeweller in ordinary” to King William III. In 1923, the bank was acquired by Glyn, Mills & Co., that eventually became part of RBS.

    After Child died in 1713, his three sons ran the business, and during this time, the business transformed from a goldsmith’s to a fully fledged bank. The bank claims it was the first to introduce a pre-printed cheque form, prior to which customers simply wrote a letter to their bank but sent it to their creditor who presented it for payment. Its first bank note was issued in 1729.

    By 1782, Child’s grandson Robert Child was the senior partner in the firm. However, when he died in 1782 without any sons to inherit the business, he did not want to leave it to his only daughter, Sarah Anne Child, because he was furious over her elopement with John Fane, 10th Earl of Westmorland earlier in the year. To prevent the Earls of Westmorland from ever acquiring his wealth, he left it in trust to his daughter’s second surviving son or eldest daughter. This turned out to be Lady Sarah Sophia Fane, who was born in 1785. She married George Child-Villiers, 5th Earl of Jersey in 1804, and upon her majority in 1806 she became senior partner. She exercised her rights personally until her death in 1867. At that point the Earl of Jersey & Frederick William Price of Harringay House were appointed as the two leading partners.[3] Ownership continued in the Jersey family until the 1920s.

    Child & Co. at 1 Fleet Street, LondonIn 1923, George, 8th Earl of Jersey sold the bank to Glyn, Mills & Co., a London-based commercial bank. Williams Deacon’s Bank acquired Glyn’s in 1939 (both subsequently taken over by the Royal Bank of Scotland and known as Williams & Glyn’s Bank from 1970 to 1985), retaining Child & Co. as a separate business, as which it continues to this day at No. 1, Fleet Street.

    [edit] ClienteleOver their 350-year history Child & Co has attracted an exclusive client base including The Honourable Societies of Middle Temple and Lincoln’s Inn, and numerous landowning families. Scholars of the Inns receive their awards by cheques drawn on Child & Co, and many Barristers continue to use the bank throughout their professional lives. Several universities including The London School of Economics, Oxford University, and Imperial College London are reported to hold accounts. Until 1979 there was a ‘representative office’ (technically not a branch) at St Giles Street Oxford.

    [edit] Relationship with Royal Bank of ScotlandChild & Co. is authorised with the Financial Services Authority for the purposes of the Financial Services Compensation Scheme as a brand of the Royal Bank of Scotland.[2] When the 311 Royal Bank of Scotland branches in England and Wales are sold to another organisation (a requirement of the financial services regulators of the UK and EU), Drummonds Bank and Child & Co. will remain part of RBS.

    http://heritagearchives.rbs.com/wiki/Joseph_Vere

  13. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_James_Child
    Francis James Child was born in Boston, Massachusetts. His lifelong friend, scholar and social reformer Charles Eliot Norton, described Child’s father, a sailmaker, as “one of that class of intelligent and independent mechanics [i.e., skilled craftsmen], which has had a large share of developing the character of our democratic community, as of old the same class had in Athens or in Florence.”[2] The family was poor, but thanks to the city of Boston’s system of free public schools, the boy was educated at the Boston’s Grammar and English High Schools. There his brilliance came to the attention of the principal of the Boston Latin School, Epes Sargent Dixwell,[3] who saw to it that the promising youngster was furnished with a scholarship to attend Harvard. At Harvard, “Frank” (nicknamed “Stubby” on account of his short stature), excelled in all classes and also read widely outside his studies for his own pleasure. Although shy and diffident on account of his working-class origins, he was soon recognized as “the best writer, best speaker, best mathematician, the most accomplished person in knowledge of general literature”[4] and he became extremely popular with his classmates. He was graduated in 1846, topping his class in all subjects and was chosen Class Orator by his graduating class (of sixty), who received his valedictory speech with “tumultuous applause”.[5] Upon graduation Child was appointed tutor in mathematics at Harvard and in 1848 was transferred to a tutorship in history, political economy, and English literature.

    In 1848, Child published a critically annotated edition (the first of the kind to be produced in America) of Four Old Plays of the early English Renaissance.[6] There were then no graduate schools in America, but a loan from a benefactor, Jonathan I. Bowditch, to whom the book was dedicated, enabled Child to take a leave of absence from his teaching duties to pursue his studies in Germany. There Child studied English drama and Germanic philology at the University of Göttingen, which conferred on him an honorary doctorate, and at Humboldt University, Berlin, where he heard lectures by the linguists Grimm and was much influenced by them.

    In 1851, at the age of 26, Child succeeded Edward T. Channing as Harvard’s Boylston Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory, a position he held until Adams Sherman Hill was appointed to the professorship in 1876. Harvard had at that time an enrollment of 382 undergraduates and a faculty of 14, including the president of the University, who was then James Walker.[7]

    As a mathematician, wrote folklore scholar David E. Bynum, Child came to his interest “in what he variously called ‘popular’, ‘primitive’, or ‘traditional’ balladry'” (that is, in oral literature, then deemed “primitive” because its stylistic features antedate the invention of writing) not by accident “but by force of logic”:

    • Renee says:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Johnson_(boxer)
      *NOTE* JOHNSON*

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Walker_(Harvard)
      James Walker (August 16, 1794 – December 23, 1874) was a Unitarian minister, professor, and President of Harvard College from February 10, 1853, to January 26, 1860.

      Walker was born to John and Lucy (Johnson) Walker in Woburn, Massachusetts (now in Burlington). From 1801-1810 he attended Lawrence Academy, graduated in 1814 from Harvard, taught for one year at the Phillips Exeter Academy, and returned to study at the Harvard Divinity School (class of 1817), after which he served for twenty years as the Unitarian minister of Harvard Church in Charlestown, Massachusetts. During this period, he was active in his parochial duties and in advocating the cause of school and college education, lectured extensively and with success, and was a close student of literature and philosophy.

      In 1838, Walker was appointed Harvard’s Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy, and Civil Polity, which position he held until 1853, when he was elected president of the college. During his administration, music was added to Harvard’s curriculum. Walker also served as a Fellow of Harvard College (1834-1853) and a member of its Board of Overseers (1825-1836, 1864-1874).

      He was president at Harvard until his resignation in 1860. He devoted the remainder of his life to scholarly pursuits, and left his library and $15,000 to Harvard, where he received the degree of D.D. in 1835. At Yale he received the degree of LL.D. in 1860.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boris_Johnson

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edwin_Walker

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_H._Johnson
      Johnson publishing and his wife Eunice WALKER Johnson*
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eunice_W._Johnson

      Neal Livingston leaves Singapore to become RBS’ head of GTS … http://www.bankingtech.com/48093/Neal-Livingston-leaves-Singapore-to-become-RBS-he...

      Sep 30, 2011 … The Royal Bank of Scotland has appointed Neal Livingston as head of Global Transaction Services for Europe, Middle East & Africa where will …

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rachel_Lambert_Mellon

      Rachel “Bunny” Lowe Lambert Lloyd Mellon (born August 9, 1910) is an American horticulturalist, gardener, philanthropist, fine arts collector, member of the International Best Dressed List and widow of philanthropist, art collector, thoroughbred racehorse owner/breeder, and banking heir Paul Mellon.

      Known as Bunny, she is the eldest child of Gerard Barnes Lambert, Sr., a president of Gillette Safety Razor Co. and a founder of Warner-Lambert (Warner-Lambert is now part of Pfizer, following a 2000 merger).[1] One of her grandfathers, chemist Jordan Lambert, invented Listerine, although it was her father who commercialized it.[2] Her mother was the former Rachel Lowe. She had two siblings: Gerard Barnes Lambert, Jr. (1912–1947; married Elsa Cover, former wife of Angus D. Mackintosh); and Lily Cary Lambert (1914–2006; married William Wilson Fleming and John Gilman McCarthy).[1]

      Mellon’s parents divorced in 1933, and in 1934, her mother re-married her former brother-in-law, Dr. Malvern Bryan Clopton, the widower of Gerard Lambert, Sr.’s sister, Lily Lambert Walker. In 1936, Gerard Lambert, Sr. also was re-married, to Grace Cleveland Lansing Mull, the former wife of John B. Mull and a daughter of Henry Livingston Lansing.[citation needed]

      Forbes Magazine has been unable to put any sort of definitive number on Mellon’s net worth since much of her fortune is tied up in trusts, but it is apparent that she is both extraordinarily wealthy and very private. In 2011, it was revealed that she had lost US$5.75M to investment adviser and convicted Ponzi scheme operator Ken Starr. Her attorney, Alex Forger, said: “She’s well off, but assets are not liquid.” She maintains homes in Antigua, Nantucket, and Oyster Harbors on Cape Cod, but two apartments in Paris and a townhouse in New York City were recently sold.[2] Her main residence, Oak Spring Farms, a 4,000-acre (1,600 ha) estate in Virginia, has its own 1-mile (1,600 m) long airstrip for her Falcon 2000.[3][4] She amassed an extraordinary collection of works by artist Mark Rothko, having purchased many of his 1950s works directly from his New York studio. One of the works, Yellow Expanse, is considered one of the greatest works that remains in private hands.[4][5]

      Mellon has long been known for her maximum discretion and minimum exposure. In a rare 1969 New York Times article, she proclaimed that “nothing should be noticed”.[6]

      [edit] MarriagesRachel Lowe Lambert married Stacy Barcroft Lloyd, Jr. in Philadelphia in 1932.[7] Lloyd served in the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. They divorced in 1948. They had two children:

      Stacy Barcroft Lloyd, III
      Eliza Winn Lloyd (died May 7, 2008; married and divorced Viscount Moore).[8] In May 2000, Eliza was hit by a truck while crossing a Manhattan street and suffered a severe brain injury. She became quadriplegic and unable to speak. She spent the remaining eight years of her life under round-the-clock care at Oak Spring Farms.[2][9]
      Lambert and Lloyd became close friends of banking heir and art collector Paul Mellon and his first wife, Mary Conover, who died of an asthma attack in 1946. After she divorced Lloyd, Paul and Bunny were married on May 1, 1948.[4] By this marriage, she had two stepchildren, Timothy Mellon and Catherine Conover Mellon (later Mrs. John Warner and now known as Catherine Conover). Together the couple collected and donated more than 1,000 works of art, mostly eighteenth- and nineteenth-century European paintings, to the National Gallery of Art.[10] The couple also bred and raced thoroughbred horses, including a winner of the Kentucky Derby.[11]

      In his autobiography, Reflections in a Silver Spoon, Paul Mellon wrote movingly of the warmth his wife brought to Oak Spring Farms, on the National Register of Historic Places. The couple decided to move out of the property’s stately brick house, designed in 1941 by William Adams Delano, whose neo-Georgian mansions were much favored by Rockefellers, Vanderbilts and other plutocrats of that era. They commissioned New York architect H. Page Cross to design Little Oak Spring, the much cozier farmhouse, completed in 1955, where Mellon still lives.[4]

      [edit] Gardening careerMellon was a longtime friend of John and Jacqueline Kennedy, advising Mrs. Kennedy first on fine arts and antiques during the Kennedy White House restoration and then contributing to the design of the grounds of the President’s house. In 1961, on Mrs. Kennedy’s request, Mellon redesigned the White House Rose Garden creating a more open space for public ceremony and introducing American species of plants including Magnolia × soulangeana. She next began to work on the White House’s East Garden, but was unable to complete it before the assassination of President Kennedy. First Lady Lady Bird Johnson asked Mellon to complete work on the East Garden and in 1965 it was dedicated as the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden.

      [edit] Later years and support for John EdwardsHer daughter Eliza was hit by a car and became a quadriplegic not long after the death of her husband, Paul, in 1999. Eliza died in 2008. Caroline Kennedy, the daughter of friend Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, sat beside her during her daughter’s funeral.[6]

      Mellon expressed interest in the John Edwards campaign as early as 2004, because he reminded her of President Kennedy, but when she called his campaign office with an offer to help, no one recognized her name and she wasn’t called back.[4] That changed when Edwards sought the 2008 Democratic Presidential nomination. In August 2008, Edwards’s campaign finance chairman Fred Baron told NBC News that he had been providing financial assistance to both Rielle Hunter and Andrew Young without Edwards’s knowledge. He further stated that no campaign funds were used. Mellon allegedly gave more than $725,000 to John Edwards over an eight-month period (through decorator Bryan Huffman) beginning in May 2007. The check falsely referred to as “chairs”, “antique Charleston table” and “bookcase.” During this period Mellon wrote a note to Young saying: “I was sitting alone in a grim mood — furious that the press attacked Senator Edwards on the price of a haircut. But it inspired me — from now on, all haircuts, etc. that are necessary and important for his campaign — please send the bills to me… It is a way to help our friend without government restrictions.” The funds were believed to be used to secretly support Hunter, with whom Edwards had an extra-marital affair and child. The FBI interviewed Mellon at her estate in Upperville, Virginia, on two occasions in 2010.[6] Then in early December of that same year, her son, Stacy Lloyd, III, grandsons, Stacy Lloyd, IV and Thomas Lloyd, along with grandson Thomas Lloyd’s wife, Ricki Lloyd, appeared before a grand jury in Raleigh, North Carolina.[12] On June 3, 2011, Edwards was indicted on using campaign funds to help cover-up an affair and pregnancy during the 2008 presidential campaign. Mellon was widely believed to be ‘Person C’ described in the indictment.[3] Just one week prior to his indictment in late May 2011, Edwards visited Mellon at her Upperville estate. Following his indictment, the judge forbade Edwards to speak with any potential witnesses. People close to Mellon said that the money was a personal gift and that she had no idea how Mr. Edwards used it.[6]

      Although described as strong and resilient, her health has deteriorated due to a bad fall and a bout with cancer. She no longer spends her days gardening. “I had a serious operation a little while ago, and ever since then I’ve been very, very weak,” Mellon says. “I’m going along on very weak wheels.” Most distressing is her loss of vision, as a result of macular degeneration, but she continues to stay active.[2] She still swims and does Pilates, which she learned from the exercise’s inventor Joseph Pilates more than 50 years ago.

    • Renee says:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarah_Fane,_Countess_of_Westmorland
      Sarah Fane, Countess of Westmorland (née Sarah Anne Child; 28 August 1764 – 9 November 1793) was the only child of Robert Child, the owner of Osterley Park and principal shareholder in the banking firm Child & Co. She married John Fane, 10th Earl of Westmorland on 20 May 1782 at Gretna Green after they eloped together. Her parents were dissatisfied with the match, having higher prospects in mind, but Sarah Anne told her mother, “A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.”[1] Her father cut her out of his will,[2] leaving his house and fortune to Sarah Anne’s second son or eldest daughter, instead of the Westmorland heir.[1]

      Sarah Anne and the earl’s surviving children were:

      John Fane, 11th Earl of Westmorland (1784–1859)
      Lady Sarah Sophia Fane (1785–1867), married George Child-Villiers, 5th Earl of Jersey in 1804.
      Lady Augusta Fane (1786–1871), m. 1. John Parker, Lord Boringdon (later 1st Earl of Morley) in 1804, divorced 1809; m. 2 also in 1809 Sir Arthur Paget (1771–1840), son of the 1st Earl of Uxbridge.
      Lady Maria Fane (1787–1834), m. 1805 John Ponsonby, Viscount Duncannon, later 4th Earl of Bessborough.
      Lady Charlotte Fane (1793–1822)
      As only one son survived, most of Child’s fortune eventually went to his eldest granddaughter, Lady Sarah Sophia.

      The Earl of Jersey
      GCH, PC
      Lord Chamberlain of the Household
      In office
      24 July 1830 – 24 November 1830
      Monarch William IV
      Prime Minister The Duke of Wellington
      Preceded by The Duke of Montrose
      Succeeded by The Duke of Devonshire
      In office
      15 December 1834 – 8 April 1835
      Monarch William IV
      Prime Minister Sir Robert Peel, Bt
      Preceded by The Duke of Devonshire
      Succeeded by The Marquess Wellesley
      Master of the Horse
      In office
      4 September 1841 – 29 June 1846
      Monarch Victoria
      Prime Minister Sir Robert Peel, Bt
      Preceded by The Earl of Albermarle
      Succeeded by The Duke of Norfolk
      In office
      1 March 1852 – 17 December 1852
      Monarch Victoria
      Prime Minister The Earl of Derby
      Preceded by The Duke of Norfolk
      Succeeded by The Duke of Wellington
      Personal details
      Born 19 August 1773
      Died 3 October 1859
      Nationality British
      Political party Conservative
      Spouse(s) Lady Sarah Fane
      (1785–1867)
      Alma mater St John’s College, Cambridge

  14. Renee says:

    Key Bank:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Society_Bank
    KeyBank (NYSE: KEY) is a regional bank headquartered in Key Tower within Cleveland, Ohio’s Public Square. As of 2007[update], it is the 19th largest bank in the United States based on total deposits.[1] It is the 24th largest bank in the United States by total assets.[2]

    KeyBank National Association is a nationally chartered bank, regulated by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, Department of the Treasury.

    KeyBank has approximately 17,468 employees[3] and a diverse client base. Key’s customer base spans retail, small business, corporate, and investment clients. There are 1,078 KeyBank[4] branches, located in Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut, Idaho, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Utah, Vermont, and Washington, and 1,479 ATMs. KeyCorp maintains business offices in 31 states. In 2008, Key was ranked 321 on the Fortune 500 list.[5]

    KeyBank also has several major sub-headquarters throughout Ohio; these are located in Cincinnati, Columbus, and Dayton. KeyBank recently took naming rights to the former MeadWestvaco Tower in Dayton, renaming it KeyBank Tower.

    With RBS-owned Citizens Financial Group acquiring Charter One Financial in 2004 (though the latter retained its name in most areas under Citizens ownership) and the acquisition of National City by PNC Financial Services in 2008, KeyBank remains the only major bank based in Cleveland.

    Industry Financial services
    Founded 1825
    Headquarters Cleveland, Ohio, US
    Key people Beth E. Mooney, CEO
    Thomas C. Stevens
    Chris Gorman
    Products Banking
    Revenue $4.465 billion (2010)
    Net income $920 million (2011)
    Total assets $89 billion (2011)
    Employees 15,381 (2011)

    *NOTE* GORMAN
    *STEVENS*
    MOONEY**

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