The King

©Renee 2012

When you mention “the King”, different people have different thoughts. The word covers much ground, so let us explore a few “Kings” here.

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51 Responses to The King

  1. Renee says:

    The name King is combined sometimes.
    http://thepeerage.com/p20044.htm#i200437
    Henry Robert Kingscote1
    M, #200431, b. 25 May 1802, d. 13 July 1882

    Henry Robert Kingscote|b. 25 May 1802\nd. 13 Jul 1882|p20044.htm#i200431|Thomas Kingscote|b. c 1750\nd. 15 Apr 1811|p19559.htm#i195589|Harriet Peyton|b. 30 Nov 1777\nd. 9 Jul 1845|p19559.htm#i195590|Robert F. Kingscote|b. c 1731\nd. 31 Aug 1762|p21718.htm#i217178|Mary Hammond|d. c 31 Oct 1767|p21718.htm#i217179|Sir Henry D. Peyton, 1st Bt.|d. May 1789|p19560.htm#i195591|Frances Rous|d. 27 May 1808|p20044.htm#i200437|

    Last Edited=9 Jun 2012
    Henry Robert Kingscote was born on 25 May 1802 at Hinton, Hampshire, England.2,1 He was the son of Thomas Kingscote and Harriet Peyton.1 He married Harriett Elizabeth Tower, daughter of Christopher Thomas Tower, on 11 July 1833.1 He died on 13 July 1882 at age 80 at Chelsea, London, England.3,1
    He was President of the Marylebone Cricket Club circa 1826.2
    Children of Henry Robert Kingscote and Harriett Elizabeth Tower
    Aldena A. Kingscote1 b. 1835, d. 20 Oct 1908
    Laura Elizabeth Kingscote+1 b. 1836, d. 15 Jul 1927
    Henry Kingscote2 b. 4 Jun 1837, d. 18 Mar 1838
    Emily Sophia Kingscote3 b. 1839, d. 1889
    Henry Fitzhardinge Kingscote2 b. 29 May 1840, d. 7 Apr 1841
    Arthur Fitzhardinge Kingscote1 b. 12 Jul 1841
    Eva Kingscote+1 b. 1843, d. 8 Oct 1872
    Algernon Kingscote3 b. 1844
    Colonel Howard Kingscote+1 b. 29 Apr 1845, d. 17 Mar 1917
    Anthony Kingscote1 b. 17 Oct 1846
    Edith S. Kingscote1 b. 24 Dec 1850
    Citations
    [S40] L. G. Pine, editor, Burke’s Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry, 17th edition, (London, England: Burke’s Peerage Ltd, 1952), page 1442. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Landed Gentry, 17th ed.
    [S1541] Beatrice Potter, “re: Lady Isabella Somerset,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 30 November 2005. Hereinafter cited as “re: Isabella Somerset.”
    [S1122] Peerage News, online http://peeragenews.blogspot.co.nz/. Hereinafter cited as Peerage News.
    Robert Arthur Fitzhardinge Kingscote1
    M, #200432, b. 8 August 1811, d. 15 February 1888

    Robert Arthur Fitzhardinge Kingscote|b. 8 Aug 1811\nd. 15 Feb 1888|p20044.htm#i200432|Thomas Kingscote|b. c 1750\nd. 15 Apr 1811|p19559.htm#i195589|Harriet Peyton|b. 30 Nov 1777\nd. 9 Jul 1845|p19559.htm#i195590|Robert F. Kingscote|b. c 1731\nd. 31 Aug 1762|p21718.htm#i217178|Mary Hammond|d. c 31 Oct 1767|p21718.htm#i217179|Sir Henry D. Peyton, 1st Bt.|d. May 1789|p19560.htm#i195591|Frances Rous|d. 27 May 1808|p20044.htm#i200437|

    Last Edited=12 Sep 2010
    Robert Arthur Fitzhardinge Kingscote was born on 8 August 1811 at Kingscote, Gloucestershire, England.2 He was the son of Thomas Kingscote and Harriet Peyton.1 He married Rosamund Daniell, daughter of Colonel John Daniell and Mary East, on 27 October 1846 at Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England.2 He died on 15 February 1888 at age 76 at 2 Westminster Terrace, Harrogate, Yorkshire, North Riding, England.1,2 His will was probated on 14 March 1888, to Robert Frederick Kingscote.2
    Children of Robert Arthur Fitzhardinge Kingscote and Rosamund Daniell
    Robert Frederick Kingscote2 b. 1849, d. 24 May 1931
    Mary Holford Kingscote2 b. 23 Feb 1850, d. 27 Feb 1923
    Evelyn Kingscote2 b. 6 Aug 1852, d. 16 Jul 1933
    Dr. Ernest Kingscote+2 b. 9 Sep 1856, d. 16 Jun 1934
    Emily Kingscote+2 b. 8 Sep 1860
    Citations
    [S40] L. G. Pine, editor, Burke’s Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry, 17th edition, (London, England: Burke’s Peerage Ltd, 1952), page 1442. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Landed Gentry, 17th ed.
    [S1541] Beatrice Potter, “re: Lady Isabella Somerset,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 30 November 2005. Hereinafter cited as “re: Isabella Somerset.”
    Emily Frances Kingscote1
    F, #200433, b. 2 August 1805, d. 16 May 1858

    Emily Frances Kingscote|b. 2 Aug 1805\nd. 16 May 1858|p20044.htm#i200433|Thomas Kingscote|b. c 1750\nd. 15 Apr 1811|p19559.htm#i195589|Harriet Peyton|b. 30 Nov 1777\nd. 9 Jul 1845|p19559.htm#i195590|Robert F. Kingscote|b. c 1731\nd. 31 Aug 1762|p21718.htm#i217178|Mary Hammond|d. c 31 Oct 1767|p21718.htm#i217179|Sir Henry D. Peyton, 1st Bt.|d. May 1789|p19560.htm#i195591|Frances Rous|d. 27 May 1808|p20044.htm#i200437|

    Last Edited=9 Jul 2010
    Emily Frances Kingscote was born on 2 August 1805.2 She was the daughter of Thomas Kingscote and Harriet Peyton.1 She married Sir John Kennaway, 2nd Bt., son of Sir John Kennaway, 1st Bt. and Charlotte Amyatt, on 28 April 1831.1 She died on 16 May 1858 at age 52 at Axbridge, Somerset, England.1
    From 28 April 1831, her married name became Kennaway.1
    Children of Emily Frances Kingscote and Sir John Kennaway, 2nd Bt.
    Emily Charlotte Kennaway3 d. 21 Jan 1872
    Rt. Hon. Sir John Henry Kennaway, 3rd Bt.+4 b. 6 Jun 1837, d. 23 Sep 1919
    Lt.-Col. Charles William Kennaway+3 b. 6 Apr 1843, d. 28 Jul 1914
    Gerard Acland Kennaway3 b. 13 Jun 1845, d. 29 Nov 1859
    Reverend Richard Arthur Kennaway+3 b. 28 Feb 1847, d. 17 Jan 1918
    Citations
    [S40] L. G. Pine, editor, Burke’s Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry, 17th edition, (London, England: Burke’s Peerage Ltd, 1952), page 1442. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Landed Gentry, 17th ed.
    [S1541] Beatrice Potter, “re: Lady Isabella Somerset,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 30 November 2005. Hereinafter cited as “re: Isabella Somerset.”
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003). Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition, volume 2, page 2132.
    Caroline Marianne Kingscote1
    F, #200434, b. 29 September 1809, d. 15 March 1875

    Caroline Marianne Kingscote|b. 29 Sep 1809\nd. 15 Mar 1875|p20044.htm#i200434|Thomas Kingscote|b. c 1750\nd. 15 Apr 1811|p19559.htm#i195589|Harriet Peyton|b. 30 Nov 1777\nd. 9 Jul 1845|p19559.htm#i195590|Robert F. Kingscote|b. c 1731\nd. 31 Aug 1762|p21718.htm#i217178|Mary Hammond|d. c 31 Oct 1767|p21718.htm#i217179|Sir Henry D. Peyton, 1st Bt.|d. May 1789|p19560.htm#i195591|Frances Rous|d. 27 May 1808|p20044.htm#i200437|

    Last Edited=7 Sep 2010
    Caroline Marianne Kingscote was born on 29 September 1809 at Hinton Ampner, Somerset, England.2 She was the daughter of Thomas Kingscote and Harriet Peyton.1 She married Reverend Alan Gardner Cornwall, son of John Cornwall, in 1828.1 She died on 15 March 1875 at age 65 at Newton Abbot, Devon, England.2
    From 1828, her married name became Cornwall.1
    Child of Caroline Marianne Kingscote and Reverend Alan Gardner Cornwall
    Caroline Augusta Cornwall+2 b. 21 Apr 1833, d. 7 Apr 1899
    Citations
    [S40] L. G. Pine, editor, Burke’s Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry, 17th edition, (London, England: Burke’s Peerage Ltd, 1952), page 1442. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Landed Gentry, 17th ed.
    [S1541] Beatrice Potter, “re: Lady Isabella Somerset,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 30 November 2005. Hereinafter cited as “re: Isabella Somerset.”
    Margaret Peyton1
    F, #200435

    Margaret Peyton||p20044.htm#i200435|Sir Sewster Peyton, 2nd Bt.||p20044.htm#i200436|Anne Dashwood||p34458.htm#i344580|Sir Algernon Peyton, 1st Bt.|b. 1645\nd. 1671|p34458.htm#i344576||||George Dashwood|b. 1617\nd. 8 Mar 1682|p15267.htm#i152662|Margaret Perry|d. 7 May 1714|p15267.htm#i152663|

    Last Edited=22 Mar 2009
    Margaret Peyton is the daughter of Sir Sewster Peyton, 2nd Bt. and Anne Dashwood.1,2 She married George Dashwood, son of Lt.-Col. George Dashwood and Algerina Peyton.2
    Her married name became Dashwood.2
    Child of Margaret Peyton and George Dashwood
    Sir Henry Dashwood Peyton, 1st Bt.+1 d. May 1789
    Citations
    [S1541] Beatrice Potter, “re: Lady Isabella Somerset,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 30 November 2005. Hereinafter cited as “re: Isabella Somerset.”
    [S229] Burke John and John Bernard Burke, A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Extinct and Dormant Baronetcies of England (1841, reprint; Baltimore, Maryland, USA: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1985), page 412. Hereinafter cited as Extinct and Dormant Baronetcies of England.

    Sir Sewster Peyton, 2nd Bt.1
    M, #200436

    Sir Sewster Peyton, 2nd Bt.||p20044.htm#i200436|Sir Algernon Peyton, 1st Bt.|b. 1645\nd. 1671|p34458.htm#i344576||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=22 Mar 2009
    Sir Sewster Peyton, 2nd Bt. is the son of Sir Algernon Peyton, 1st Bt.2 He married Anne Dashwood, daughter of George Dashwood and Margaret Perry, on 17 July 1701.3
    He gained the title of 2nd Baronet Peyton, of Doddington.
    Child of Sir Sewster Peyton, 2nd Bt. and Anne Dashwood
    Margaret Peyton+1
    Citations
    [S1541] Beatrice Potter, “re: Lady Isabella Somerset,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 30 November 2005. Hereinafter cited as “re: Isabella Somerset.”
    [S229] Burke John and John Bernard Burke, A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Extinct and Dormant Baronetcies of England (1841, reprint; Baltimore, Maryland, USA: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1985), page 412. Hereinafter cited as Extinct and Dormant Baronetcies of England.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1041. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Frances Rous1
    F, #200437, d. 27 May 1808

    Frances Rous|d. 27 May 1808|p20044.htm#i200437|Sir John Rous, 5th Bt.||p20044.htm#i200438||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=17 Jul 2006
    Frances Rous was the daughter of Sir John Rous, 5th Bt.1 She married Sir Henry Dashwood Peyton, 1st Bt., son of George Dashwood and Margaret Peyton. She died on 27 May 1808.1
    Her married name became Peyton.1
    Children of Frances Rous and Sir Henry Dashwood Peyton, 1st Bt.
    Frances Peyton1
    Louisa Peyton1
    Harriet Peyton+1 b. 30 Nov 1777, d. 9 Jul 1845
    Sir Henry Peyton, 2nd Bt.1 b. 1 Jul 1779
    Reverend Algernon Peyton1 b. 9 Aug 1786
    Citations
    [S1541] Beatrice Potter, “re: Lady Isabella Somerset,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 30 November 2005. Hereinafter cited as “re: Isabella Somerset.”
    Sir John Rous, 5th Bt.1
    M, #200438

    Last Edited=27 Jun 2007
    Sir John Rous, 5th Bt. married Judith Bedingfeld, daughter of John Bedingfeld, before 1772.1
    He gained the title of 5th Baronet Rous, of Henham Hall.
    Child of Sir John Rous, 5th Bt.
    Frances Rous+2 d. 27 May 1808
    Citations
    [S21] L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 169. Hereinafter cited as The New Extinct Peerage.
    [S1541] Beatrice Potter, “re: Lady Isabella Somerset,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 30 November 2005. Hereinafter cited as “re: Isabella Somerset.”
    Frances Peyton1
    F, #200439

    Frances Peyton||p20044.htm#i200439|Sir Henry Dashwood Peyton, 1st Bt.|d. May 1789|p19560.htm#i195591|Frances Rous|d. 27 May 1808|p20044.htm#i200437|George Dashwood||p34453.htm#i344528|Margaret Peyton||p20044.htm#i200435|Sir John Rous, 5th Bt.||p20044.htm#i200438||||

    Last Edited=17 Jul 2006
    Frances Peyton is the daughter of Sir Henry Dashwood Peyton, 1st Bt. and Frances Rous.1
    Citations
    [S1541] Beatrice Potter, “re: Lady Isabella Somerset,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 30 November 2005. Hereinafter cited as “re: Isabella Somerset.”
    Louisa Peyton1
    F, #200440

    Louisa Peyton||p20044.htm#i200440|Sir Henry Dashwood Peyton, 1st Bt.|d. May 1789|p19560.htm#i195591|Frances Rous|d. 27 May 1808|p20044.htm#i200437|George Dashwood||p34453.htm#i344528|Margaret Peyton||p20044.htm#i200435|Sir John Rous, 5th Bt.||p20044.htm#i200438||||

    Last Edited=17 Jul 2006
    Louisa Peyton is the daughter of Sir Henry Dashwood Peyton, 1st Bt. and Frances Rous.1
    Citations
    [S1541] Beatrice Potter, “re: Lady Isabella Somerset,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 30 November 2005. Hereinafter cited as “re: Isabella Somerset.”

  2. Renee says:

    Soundex Code for Coutts = C320
    Other surnames sharing this Soundex Code:
    CATES | CHADWICK | CHEDZEY | CHITTICK | COATES | COATS | COUTS | COUTTS | CUTTS |

    http://thepeerage.com/p1290.htm
    Thomas John Wynn1
    M, #12891, b. 31 December 1840, d. 25 August 1878

    Thomas John Wynn|b. 31 Dec 1840\nd. 25 Aug 1878|p1290.htm#i12891|Spencer Bulkeley Wynn, 3rd Baron Newborough|b. 23 May 1803\nd. 1 Nov 1888|p5119.htm#i51186|Frances Maria de Winton|b. b 1819\nd. 18 Nov 1857|p5698.htm#i56971|Thomas Wynn, 1st Baron Newborough|b. Apr 1736\nd. 12 Oct 1807|p8497.htm#i84967|Maria S. P. Chiappini|d. 28 Dec 1843|p8498.htm#i84971|Reverend Walter de Winton||p5119.htm#i51184|Maria J. Chiappini||p22107.htm#i221068|

    Last Edited=9 Nov 2007
    Thomas John Wynn was born on 31 December 1840 at Glynlliffon, Llandwrog, Caernarvonshire, Wales.2 He was the son of Spencer Bulkeley Wynn, 3rd Baron Newborough and Frances Maria de Winton.2 He died on 25 August 1878 at age 37.2
    Children of Thomas John Wynn and Sybil Anna Catherine Corbett
    Hon. Mabel Wynn1 b. 1872, d. 14 Feb 1970
    William Charles Wynn, 4th Baron Newborough3 b. 4 Nov 1873, d. 20 Jul 1916
    Stella Frances Wynn2 b. 1874, d. 1875
    Spencer Perceval Wynn2 b. c 1876, d. 1876
    Dorothy Beatrix Wynn2 b. 1877
    Thomas John Wynn+2 b. 22 Nov 1878
    Citations
    [S8] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volume 1, page 84. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition.
    [S264] David Gardiner, online unknown url, David Gardiner (unknown location), downloaded 5 March 2007.
    [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume IX, page 510. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
    Thomas Coutts1
    M, #12892, d. before 1827

    Last Edited=20 Jul 2008
    Thomas Coutts married, secondly, Harriet Mellon, daughter of Matthew Mellon.1 He married, firstly, Susan Starkie.1 He died before 1827.
    He was a banker at The Strand, London, England.1
    Children of Thomas Coutts and Susan Starkie
    Frances Coutts+2 d. 12 Nov 1832
    Sophia Coutts+1 d. 12 Jan 1844
    Susan Coutts+2 d. 24 Sep 1837
    Citations
    [S15] George Edward Cokayne, editor, The Complete Baronetage, 5 volumes (no date (c. 1900); reprint, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 1983), volume I, page 120. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Baronetage.
    [S21] L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 45. Hereinafter cited as The New Extinct Peerage.
    Hon. Sir John Walter Huddleston
    M, #12893, d. 5 December 1890

    Last Edited=13 Mar 2003
    Hon. Sir John Walter Huddleston married Diana de Vere Beauclerk, daughter of William Aubrey de Vere Beauclerk, 9th Duke of St. Albans and Elizabeth Catherine Gubbins, on 18 December 1872. He died on 5 December 1890.
    He held the office of Baron of the Exchequer.
    Saher de Quency, 1st Earl of Winchester1
    M, #12894, d. 3 November 1219

    Saher de Quency, 1st Earl of Winchester|d. 3 Nov 1219|p1290.htm#i12894|Robert de Quency|b. b 1163\nd. c 1197|p18989.htm#i189884|Orable (?)||p18992.htm#i189911|||||||Nes (?)||p18992.htm#i189912||||

    Last Edited=27 Dec 2011
    Saher de Quency, 1st Earl of Winchester was the son of Robert de Quency and Orable (?).2,3 He married Margaret (?), daughter of Robert, 3rd Earl of Leicester and Pernel Grandmesnil. He died on 3 November 1219 at Damietta.4
    He was created 1st Earl of Winchester [England] in 1206.5
    Children of Saher de Quency, 1st Earl of Winchester
    Hawise de Quincy+1
    Robert de Quincey+6 d. c 1232
    Children of Saher de Quency, 1st Earl of Winchester and Margaret (?)
    Roger de Quency, 2nd Earl of Winchester+7 d. 25 Apr 1264
    Robert de Quincy, Lord of Ware+8 d. Aug 1257
    Citations
    [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 196. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
    [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 747.
    [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 748.
    [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 750.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 2603. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume VII, page 676.
    [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 749.
    [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 169.
    Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl of Oxford
    M, #12895, b. circa 1164, d. circa October 1221

    Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl of Oxford|b. c 1164\nd. c Oct 1221|p1290.htm#i12895|Aubrey de Vere, 1st Earl of Oxford|b. c 1110\nd. 26 Dec 1194|p1290.htm#i12899|Agnes de Essex||p1290.htm#i12900|Aubrey de Vere|b. 1090\nd. 15 May 1141|p27438.htm#i274379|Alice F. Clare|d. 1163|p40724.htm#i407231|Henry de Essex, Lord Rayleigh and Haughley||p2360.htm#i23598||||

    Last Edited=1 Dec 2008
    Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl of Oxford was born circa 1164. He was the son of Aubrey de Vere, 1st Earl of Oxford and Agnes de Essex. He married Isabel de Bolebec, daughter of Hugh de Bolebec.1 He died circa October 1221.2
    He gained the title of 3rd Earl of Oxford.
    Child of Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl of Oxford and Isabel de Bolebec
    Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford+2 b. c 1210, d. c 1263
    Citations
    [S2] Peter W. Hammond, editor, The Complete Peerage or a History of the House of Lords and All its Members From the Earliest Times, Volume XIV: Addenda & Corrigenda (Stroud, Gloucestershire, U.K.: Sutton Publishing, 1998), page 95. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage, Volume XIV.
    [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume II, page 203. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

    Isabel de Bolebec1
    F, #12896, d. 1206/7

    Isabel de Bolebec|d. 1206/7|p1290.htm#i12896|Walter de Bolebec||p1290.htm#i12897||||Hugh de Bolebec||p13794.htm#i137935||||||||||

    Last Edited=4 Jan 2005
    Isabel de Bolebec was the daughter of Walter de Bolebec.1 She married, firstly, Aubrey de Vere, 2nd Earl of Oxford, son of Aubrey de Vere, 1st Earl of Oxford and Agnes de Essex.2 She died in 1206/7, without issue.2
    Her married name became de Vere.1
    Citations
    [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume II, page 203. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
    [S2] Peter W. Hammond, editor, The Complete Peerage or a History of the House of Lords and All its Members From the Earliest Times, Volume XIV: Addenda & Corrigenda (Stroud, Gloucestershire, U.K.: Sutton Publishing, 1998), page 95. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage, Volume XIV.
    Walter de Bolebec1
    M, #12897

    Walter de Bolebec||p1290.htm#i12897|Hugh de Bolebec||p13794.htm#i137935||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=4 Jan 2005
    Walter de Bolebec is the son of Hugh de Bolebec.1
    He lived at Whitechurch, Buckinghamshire, England.2 He gained the title of Lord of Whitechurch [Feudal].1
    Child of Walter de Bolebec
    Isabel de Bolebec2 d. 1206/7
    Citations
    [S2] Peter W. Hammond, editor, The Complete Peerage or a History of the House of Lords and All its Members From the Earliest Times, Volume XIV: Addenda & Corrigenda (Stroud, Gloucestershire, U.K.: Sutton Publishing, 1998), page 95. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage, Volume XIV.
    [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume II, page 203. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
    Masha Anne Hudson1
    F, #12898

    Masha Anne Hudson||p1290.htm#i12898|Major Francis Edward Hudson|b. 10 Jun 1912\nd. 10 Sep 2002|p1291.htm#i12902|Masha Muirhead-Murray|d. 14 Jun 2001|p14529.htm#i145284|Edward Hudson|d. 1945|p14529.htm#i145285||||Lt.-Col. Murray Muirhead-Murray||p11786.htm#i117852|Violet E. Vavasour||p14529.htm#i145286|

    Last Edited=4 Jan 2005
    Masha Anne Hudson is the daughter of Major Francis Edward Hudson and Masha Muirhead-Murray.1,2 She married Richard William Algar Orde-Powlett, 7th Baron Bolton of Bolton Castle, son of Nigel Amyas Orde-Powlett, 6th Baron Bolton of Bolton Castle and Victoria Mary Villiers, in 1981.1 She and Richard William Algar Orde-Powlett, 7th Baron Bolton of Bolton Castle were divorced in 1990.3
    As a result of her marriage, Masha Anne Hudson was styled as Baroness Bolton of Bolton Castle in 1981. From 1981, her married name became Orde-Powlett.1
    Citations
    [S2] Peter W. Hammond, editor, The Complete Peerage or a History of the House of Lords and All its Members From the Earliest Times, Volume XIV: Addenda & Corrigenda (Stroud, Gloucestershire, U.K.: Sutton Publishing, 1998), page 98. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage, Volume XIV.
    [S1122] Peerage News, online http://peeragenews.blogspot.co.nz/. Hereinafter cited as Peerage News.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 421. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Aubrey de Vere, 1st Earl of Oxford
    M, #12899, b. circa 1110, d. 26 December 1194

    Aubrey de Vere, 1st Earl of Oxford|b. c 1110\nd. 26 Dec 1194|p1290.htm#i12899|Aubrey de Vere|b. 1090\nd. 15 May 1141|p27438.htm#i274379|Alice FitzRichard Clare|d. 1163|p40724.htm#i407231|Aubrey de Vere|b. 1040\nd. 1112|p40724.htm#i407232|Beatrice (?)||p40724.htm#i407233|||||||

    Last Edited=17 Feb 2009
    Aubrey de Vere, 1st Earl of Oxford was born circa 1110. He was the son of Aubrey de Vere and Alice FitzRichard Clare.1,2 He married, firstly, Beatrice de Guises, daughter of unknown de Guises, Comte de Guises, in 1139. He and Beatrice de Guises were divorced circa 1146. He married, secondly, Agnes de Essex, daughter of Henry de Essex, Lord Rayleigh and Haughley, circa 1162. He died on 26 December 1194.
    He gained the title of 1st Earl of Oxford.
    Children of Aubrey de Vere, 1st Earl of Oxford and Agnes de Essex
    William de Vere
    Aubrey de Vere, 2nd Earl of Oxford b. c 1163, d. c 1214
    Alice de Vere3 b. a 1163, d. a 1214
    Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl of Oxford+ b. c 1164, d. c Oct 1221
    Citations
    [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume IX, page 585. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
    [S1916] Tim Boyle, “re: Boyle Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 16 September 2006. Hereinafter cited as “re: Boyle Family.”
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 3, page 3531. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Agnes de Essex
    F, #12900

    Agnes de Essex||p1290.htm#i12900|Henry de Essex, Lord Rayleigh and Haughley||p2360.htm#i23598||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=17 Feb 2009
    Agnes de Essex is the daughter of Henry de Essex, Lord Rayleigh and Haughley. She married Aubrey de Vere, 1st Earl of Oxford, son of Aubrey de Vere and Alice FitzRichard Clare, circa 1162.
    Her married name became de Vere.
    Children of Agnes de Essex and Aubrey de Vere, 1st Earl of Oxford
    William de Vere
    Aubrey de Vere, 2nd Earl of Oxford b. c 1163, d. c 1214
    Alice de Vere1 b. a 1163, d. a 1214
    Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl of Oxford+ b. c 1164, d. c Oct 1221

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nigel_Paulet,_18th_Marquess_of_Winchester

  3. Renee says:

    http://www.thepeerage.com/p2546.htm
    Major Guy Danvers Wheeler1
    M, #25451, b. 1868

    Last Edited=6 Nov 2011
    Major Guy Danvers Wheeler was born in 1868 at Illawara, New South Wales, Australia.1
    He was decorated with the award of Royal Humane Society Medal (for saving a life on lake Geneva) on 12 August 1886.2 He gained the rank of Lieutenant in 1896 in the service of the Colonel Plumer’s force in charge of Maxim guns, Royal Artillery, in Rhodesia.2 He fought in the Boer War, where he became a POW, and was mentioned in despatches.2 He gained the rank of Major in the service of the Royal Field Artillery.2 He fought in the First World War.2 He lived at Harare, Zimbabwe.
    Child of Major Guy Danvers Wheeler
    Hazel Margaret Wheeler+
    Citations
    [S3207] Peter Fox, “re: Wheeler Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 1 July 2008. Hereinafter cited as “re: Wheeler Family.”
    [S3506] Meurig Jones, “re: Northumberland Fusiliers,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 14 January 2009. Hereinafter cited as “re: Northumberland Fusiliers.”
    George Meyer
    M, #25452

    Last Edited=2 Jul 2008
    George Meyer married Hazel Margaret Wheeler, daughter of Major Guy Danvers Wheeler, in 1962.
    Nigel George Paulet, 18th Marquess of Winchester
    M, #25453, b. 23 December 1941

    Nigel George Paulet, 18th Marquess of Winchester|b. 23 Dec 1941|p2546.htm#i25453|George Cecil Paulet|b. 25 Feb 1905\nd. 9 Aug 1961|p2545.htm#i25449|Hazel Margaret Wheeler||p2545.htm#i25450|Cecil H. Paulet|b. Mar 1875\nd. 26 Feb 1916|p2545.htm#i25446|Ethel F. Cowan|d. 3 Sep 1961|p2545.htm#i25447|Major Guy D. Wheeler|b. 1868|p2546.htm#i25451||||

    Last Edited=17 Oct 2003
    Nigel George Paulet, 18th Marquess of Winchester was born on 23 December 1941. He is the son of George Cecil Paulet and Hazel Margaret Wheeler. He married Rosemary Anne Hilton, daughter of Major Aubrey John Hilton, on 25 November 1967.
    He gained the title of 18th Marquess of Winchester.
    Child of Nigel George Paulet, 18th Marquess of Winchester and Rosemary Anne Hilton
    Christopher John Hilton Paulet, Earl of Wiltshire b. 30 Jul 1969
    Rosemary Anne Hilton
    F, #25454

    Rosemary Anne Hilton||p2546.htm#i25454|Major Aubrey John Hilton||p2546.htm#i25455||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=10 May 2003
    Rosemary Anne Hilton is the daughter of Major Aubrey John Hilton. She married Nigel George Paulet, 18th Marquess of Winchester, son of George Cecil Paulet and Hazel Margaret Wheeler, on 25 November 1967.
    Her married name became Paulet.
    Child of Rosemary Anne Hilton and Nigel George Paulet, 18th Marquess of Winchester
    Christopher John Hilton Paulet, Earl of Wiltshire b. 30 Jul 1969
    Major Aubrey John Hilton
    M, #25455

    Last Edited=17 Oct 2003
    Major Aubrey John Hilton lived at Harare, Zimbabwe.
    Child of Major Aubrey John Hilton
    Rosemary Anne Hilton+

    Christopher John Hilton Paulet, Earl of Wiltshire
    M, #25456, b. 30 July 1969

    Christopher John Hilton Paulet, Earl of Wiltshire|b. 30 Jul 1969|p2546.htm#i25456|Nigel George Paulet, 18th Marquess of Winchester|b. 23 Dec 1941|p2546.htm#i25453|Rosemary Anne Hilton||p2546.htm#i25454|George C. Paulet|b. 25 Feb 1905\nd. 9 Aug 1961|p2545.htm#i25449|Hazel M. Wheeler||p2545.htm#i25450|Major Aubrey J. Hilton||p2546.htm#i25455||||

    Last Edited=13 Oct 2003
    Christopher John Hilton Paulet, Earl of Wiltshire was born on 30 July 1969. He is the son of Nigel George Paulet, 18th Marquess of Winchester and Rosemary Anne Hilton.
    He was styled as Earl of Wiltshire.
    Timothy Guy Paulet
    M, #25457, b. 26 January 1944

    Timothy Guy Paulet|b. 26 Jan 1944|p2546.htm#i25457|George Cecil Paulet|b. 25 Feb 1905\nd. 9 Aug 1961|p2545.htm#i25449|Hazel Margaret Wheeler||p2545.htm#i25450|Cecil H. Paulet|b. Mar 1875\nd. 26 Feb 1916|p2545.htm#i25446|Ethel F. Cowan|d. 3 Sep 1961|p2545.htm#i25447|Major Guy D. Wheeler|b. 1868|p2546.htm#i25451||||

    Last Edited=2 Jul 2008
    Timothy Guy Paulet was born on 26 January 1944. He is the son of George Cecil Paulet and Hazel Margaret Wheeler.
    Angela Jane Paulet
    F, #25458, b. 15 November 1939

    Angela Jane Paulet|b. 15 Nov 1939|p2546.htm#i25458|George Cecil Paulet|b. 25 Feb 1905\nd. 9 Aug 1961|p2545.htm#i25449|Hazel Margaret Wheeler||p2545.htm#i25450|Cecil H. Paulet|b. Mar 1875\nd. 26 Feb 1916|p2545.htm#i25446|Ethel F. Cowan|d. 3 Sep 1961|p2545.htm#i25447|Major Guy D. Wheeler|b. 1868|p2546.htm#i25451||||

    Last Edited=2 Jul 2008
    Angela Jane Paulet was born on 15 November 1939. She is the daughter of George Cecil Paulet and Hazel Margaret Wheeler.
    Joan Frederica Mathewana Granville
    F, #25459, d. 10 December 1918

    Joan Frederica Mathewana Granville|d. 10 Dec 1918|p2546.htm#i25459|Bernard Granville|b. 4 Feb 1804|p2546.htm#i25460||||Court Granville|b. 1779\nd. 1848|p47710.htm#i477098||||||||||

    Last Edited=8 Jul 2008
    Joan Frederica Mathewana Granville was the daughter of Bernard Granville. She married Reverend Lord Charles Paulet, son of Charles Ingoldsby Paulet, 13th Marquess of Winchester and Anne Andrews, on 10 August 1850. She died on 10 December 1918.
    Her married name became Paulet.
    Bernard Granville1
    M, #25460, b. 4 February 1804

    Bernard Granville|b. 4 Feb 1804|p2546.htm#i25460|Court Granville|b. 1779\nd. 1848|p47710.htm#i477098||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=3 Sep 2011
    Bernard Granville was born on 4 February 1804.3 He was the son of Court Granville.2
    He lived at Wellesbourne Hall, Warwickshire, England.1
    Children of Bernard Granville
    Joan Frederica Mathewana Granville d. 10 Dec 1918
    Louisa Granville+1 d. 18 Nov 1913
    Major Bevil Granville+3 b. 20 Jan 1834, d. 6 Mar 1909
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 3, page 3801. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S35] Peter Townend, editor, Burke’s Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry, 18th edition, 3 volumes (London, England: Burke’s Peerage Ltd, 1965-1972), volume 2, page 256. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Landed Gentry, 18th ed.
    [S35] Peter Townend, Burke’s Landed Gentry, 18th ed., volume 2, page 257.

    http://www.thepeerage.com/p2546.htm#i25454

  4. Renee says:

    http://www.thepeerage.com/p2546.htm
    Major Guy Danvers Wheeler1
    M, #25451, b. 1868

    Last Edited=6 Nov 2011
    Major Guy Danvers Wheeler was born in 1868 at Illawara, New South Wales, Australia.1
    He was decorated with the award of Royal Humane Society Medal (for saving a life on lake Geneva) on 12 August 1886.2 He gained the rank of Lieutenant in 1896 in the service of the Colonel Plumer’s force in charge of Maxim guns, Royal Artillery, in Rhodesia.2 He fought in the Boer War, where he became a POW, and was mentioned in despatches.2 He gained the rank of Major in the service of the Royal Field Artillery.2 He fought in the First World War.2 He lived at Harare, Zimbabwe.
    Child of Major Guy Danvers Wheeler
    Hazel Margaret Wheeler+
    Citations
    [S3207] Peter Fox, “re: Wheeler Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 1 July 2008. Hereinafter cited as “re: Wheeler Family.”
    [S3506] Meurig Jones, “re: Northumberland Fusiliers,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 14 January 2009. Hereinafter cited as “re: Northumberland Fusiliers.”
    George Meyer
    M, #25452

    Last Edited=2 Jul 2008
    George Meyer married Hazel Margaret Wheeler, daughter of Major Guy Danvers Wheeler, in 1962.
    Nigel George Paulet, 18th Marquess of Winchester
    M, #25453, b. 23 December 1941

    Nigel George Paulet, 18th Marquess of Winchester|b. 23 Dec 1941|p2546.htm#i25453|George Cecil Paulet|b. 25 Feb 1905\nd. 9 Aug 1961|p2545.htm#i25449|Hazel Margaret Wheeler||p2545.htm#i25450|Cecil H. Paulet|b. Mar 1875\nd. 26 Feb 1916|p2545.htm#i25446|Ethel F. Cowan|d. 3 Sep 1961|p2545.htm#i25447|Major Guy D. Wheeler|b. 1868|p2546.htm#i25451||||

    Last Edited=17 Oct 2003
    Nigel George Paulet, 18th Marquess of Winchester was born on 23 December 1941. He is the son of George Cecil Paulet and Hazel Margaret Wheeler. He married Rosemary Anne Hilton, daughter of Major Aubrey John Hilton, on 25 November 1967.
    He gained the title of 18th Marquess of Winchester.
    Child of Nigel George Paulet, 18th Marquess of Winchester and Rosemary Anne Hilton
    Christopher John Hilton Paulet, Earl of Wiltshire b. 30 Jul 1969
    Rosemary Anne Hilton
    F, #25454

    Rosemary Anne Hilton||p2546.htm#i25454|Major Aubrey John Hilton||p2546.htm#i25455||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=10 May 2003
    Rosemary Anne Hilton is the daughter of Major Aubrey John Hilton. She married Nigel George Paulet, 18th Marquess of Winchester, son of George Cecil Paulet and Hazel Margaret Wheeler, on 25 November 1967.
    Her married name became Paulet.
    Child of Rosemary Anne Hilton and Nigel George Paulet, 18th Marquess of Winchester
    Christopher John Hilton Paulet, Earl of Wiltshire b. 30 Jul 1969

  5. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hilton_family
    Family treeThe Hilton family farmed land near Ullensaker, Norway, where relatives still live.

    Halvor Nilsen Hilton (1810–1864), m. Karoline Hansdatter “Kari” Holum.
    Augustus Halvorson “Gus” Hilton (1854–1919), m. Mary Genevieve Laufersweiler (1861–1947).
    Gus emigrated to the United States in 1870.
    Felice A. Hilton (1885–1968)
    Conrad Hilton (1887–1979)
    Eva C. Hilton (1889–1979)
    Carl H. Hilton (1892–1957)
    Julia Hilton (1895–1897)
    Rosemary J. Hilton (1898–1995)
    August H. “Boy” Hilton (1901–1929)
    Helen A. Hilton (January 30, 1906 – February 22, 2003)
    [edit] Conrad Hilton descendantsBy first wife Mary Adelaide Barron (m. 1925, div. 1934)
    Conrad Nicholson Hilton, Jr. (1926–1969), m. Patricia “Trish” McClintock. He was also the first husband of Elizabeth Taylor.
    Conrad Nicholson Hilton, III (born 1960)
    Michael Otis Hilton (born 1961)
    William Barron Hilton (b. 1927), m. Marilyn Hawley. Barron Hilton, who succeeded his father as President of Hilton Hotels and founded the Los Angeles Chargers, is a billionaire on the Forbes 400.
    William Barron Hilton, Jr. (born 1948)
    Hawley Anne Hilton (born 1949)
    Justin Hawley McAuliffe (b. 1987)
    Stephen Michael Hilton (born 1950)
    Nicholas Conrad Hilton (b. 1984)
    David Alan Hilton (born 1952)
    Sharon Constance Hilton (born 1953)
    Richard Howard Hilton (born 1955), m. Kathy Richards
    Paris Whitney Hilton (b. 1981)
    Nicholai Olivia Hilton (b. 1983)
    Barron Nicholas Hilton II (b. 1989)
    Conrad Hughes Hilton (b. 1994)
    Daniel Kevin Hilton (born 1962)
    Ronald Jeffrey Hilton (born 1963)
    Eric Michael Hilton (b. 1932)
    By second wife Zsa Zsa Gabor (m. 1942, div. 1946)
    Constance Francesca Gabor Hilton[1] (b. 1947)
    Francesca is the only child born to any of the Gabor sisters. She has no children. Divorced. She lives in Los Angeles has appeared in motion pictures, was a champion Tennessee Walking Horse competitor and Blue Ribbon winner and is a writer represented by Edward Lozzi & Associates in Beverly Hills.[2]
    No children by third wife Mary Frances Kelly (m. 1976).

    HOLUM ? Like HOLMES ?
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Holmes

  6. Renee says:

    Halvor Nilsen Hilton (1810–1864), m. Karoline Hansdatter “Kari” Holum.
    Augustus Halvorson “Gus” Hilton (1854–1919), m. Mary Genevieve Laufersweiler (1861–1947).

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wyler's
    Wyler’s is a brand of food used by Heinz for bouillon and soup, and Jel Sert for soft drinks.

    Heinz uses it for Wyler’s Instant Bouillon, a brand of bouillon cube, and Wyler’s Mrs. Grass Soup and Dip Mixes, a brand of dehydrated soups, stews, and dips.

    Jel Sert uses the Wyler’s brand for soft drinks including Flavor Aid.

    [edit] HistoryBorden bought the formerly independent Wyler & Co. in 1961. It traded the Wyler’s drink business with Lipton for Pennsylvania Dutch noodles in 1986. Jel Sert bought Wyler’s from Lipton parent Unilever in 1994.

    When Borden left the food business, it sold Wyler’s to Heinz.

    [edit] External linksOfficial site for Heinz
    Official site for Jel Sert

  7. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coats_PLC
    In 1755 James and Patrick Clark began a loom equipment and silk thread business in Paisley, Scotland.[2] In 1806 Patrick Clark invented a way of twisting cotton threads together to substitute for silk threads which were unavailable due to France’s blockade of Great Britain and opened the first plant for manufacturing the cotton thread in 1812.[3]

    In 1802 James Coats set up a weaving business, also in Paisley. In 1826 he opened a cotton mill at Ferguslie to produce his own thread[4] and, when he retired in 1830, his sons, James & Peter, took up the business under the name of J. & P. Coats.[3] The firm expanded internationally, particularly to the USA. In 1890 Coats listed on the London Stock Exchange,[2] with a capital base of £5.7M.[4]

    In 1952 J. & P. Coats and the Clark Thread Co. merged.[3] In 1961 a merger with Patons and Baldwins created Coats Patons.[2] In 1986 a merger with Vantona Viyella created Coats Viyella.[2] In 2003 the Guinness Peat Group took over Coats Ltd and it is now registered as “Coats plc”.[2]

    [edit] American branchCoats began selling its thread in the United States by the 1830s. It set up a network of agencies to sell its own Coats brand and, in 1869, began local manufacture of thread in Rhode Island. In 1864 the Clark family began manufacturing in Newark, New Jersey as the Clark Thread Co.[2] Thanks to its well-timed direct investments and the development of a flexible managerial structure, Coats came to dominate the American cotton thread market.[5]

    [edit] OperationsCoats plc does business under different names in different countries but most variations include “Coats”. For example, in the U.S., it does business as “Coats & Clark, Inc.” (consumer) and “Coats American, Inc.” (industrial). In the UK and Ireland, it does business as “Coats (UK) Ltd”, in Canada as “Coats Canada Inc” (and has an industrial subsidiary “Coats Bell”), and as “Coats Australian Pty Ltd” in Australia. Coats in Egypt does business as “Coats Egypt”.

    [edit] ControversyIn June 2012, Coats plc lost court challenges against European Union antitrust fines for fixing the price of fastners such as zippers, rivets and snaps.[6] The European General Court dismissed Coats’ appeal on all counts and upheld the 110m Euro fine imposed by the European Commission in its original decision of 19 September 2007.[7]

    In February 2012, it is alleged union leaders were held captive by factory managers in Bangladesh whilst trying to resolve an industrial dispute. Union leaders had their mobile phones confiscated and were forcibly detained in Coats’ head office building overnight, only releasing them when trade union colleagues alerted the local media.[8]

    [edit] ProductsCoats makes and sells thread, zips, yarn, speciality textiles and related goods.

    [edit] SpecialityCoats sells items catering to the needs of industries such as footwear, mattresses, quilting, automotive, outdoor and camping goods and furniture. Their operational units are accredited with TS16949, ISO9001, Ford Q1 Mark, SATRA Quality Mark and others.[9]

    [edit] ZipsCoats produces zips for industrial applications in the apparel and speciality sectors, as well as for craft and home sewing usage.[10]

    [edit] CraftsCoats make products suitable for a variety of needlecrafts such as knitting, crochet, embroidery and quilting.[11]

    [edit] BrandsDual Duty Plus
    Red Heart
    TLC
    Anchor
    J & P Coats
    South Maid
    Susan Bates
    Aunt Lydia
    Milward Henry Milward & Sons
    Prym
    Sylko

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kimberly-Clark

  8. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Davis_(Hawaii)
    Isaac Davis (c. 1758–1810) was a Welsh advisor to Kamehameha I and helped form the Kingdom of Hawaii. He arrived in Hawaii in 1790 as the sole survivor of the massacre of the crew of The Fair American. He along with John Young became friends and advisors to Kamehameha. He brought western military knowledge to Hawaii and played a big role during Hawaii’s first contacts with the European powers. He spent the rest of his life in Hawaiʻi and was known to the Hawaiian as ʻAikake.

    Isaac Davis was born about 1758 in Milford Haven, Pembrokeshire, Wales.[1] He was a seaman on the American schooner Fair American, engaged with a larger companion ship, the Eleanora, in the maritime fur trade between the Pacific Northwest and China.

    In 1790, the Eleanora was under the Captain Simon Metcalfe, when one of his skiffs was stolen by the chief Kaʻōpūiki at Honuaula on Maui. He punished the Hawaiians severely, killing more than 100 Hawaiians at Olowalu.

    Metcalfe also once mistreated Kameʻeiamoku, a high chief on the island of Hawaii, and one of the sacred pio twins, by whipping him. The humiliated Kameʻeiamoku swore vengeance on the next ship to arrive. He attacked The Fair American at Kaʻūpūlehu, which was under the command of Metcalfe’s 18-year-old son, Thomas. Thomas and all of the Fair American’s crew were killed, except for Isaac Davis, the sole survivor of the attack, who was tied to a canoe and left nearly dead. It is said that Davis’s life was spared because of his brave fighting.

    In March 1790, Simon Metcalfe left his boatswain, John Young, ashore and sailed away from the Hawaiian Islands without knowing that his son had been killed. The Fair American was taken over by Kamehameha. Davis was nursed back to health by an American beachcomber named Isaac Ridler. Like his friend Young, Davis assisted Kamehameha in his dealings with foreigners and in wars of conquest.[2]

    Davis was given the Hawaiian name ʻAikake and was given the status of a high chief, marrying a relative of King Kamehameha I. He was appointed Governor of Oʻahu, and owned estates on Oʻahu, Maui, Molokaʻi, and the Big Island

    [edit] Family
    Davis’s son George in later life.Davis first married Nakai Nalimaʻaluʻalu,[3] a chiefess with whom he had one daughter in 1797, Sarah (Sally or Kale) Kaniʻaulono Davis, named after his sister Sarah in Wales. Kale Davis lived in Honokaula, Maui, had six children, and died in 1867.

    After Nakai died in the ukuʻu plague, Davis married Kalukuna,[4] a relative of Kamehameha, in Honolulu, and founded a prominent family in the islands. They had two children. His son George Hueu Davis was born on January 10, 1800. His daughter Elizabeth “Betty” Peke Davis was born on February 12, 1803. His son married Kahaanapilo Papa and had three sons; among them was Isaac Young Davis who was the second husband of Princess Ruth Keʻelikōlani. His daughter Betty married George Prince Kaumualiʻi (also known as Humehume), the son of King Kaumualiʻi of Kauaʻi.[1]

    After his death, his companion John Young looked after his children. Two of them were living with him in 1807, and after Davis’s murder in 1810 Young continued to care for them. In Young’s will, dated 1834, he divided his lands equally between both his own and Davis’s children.

  9. Renee says:

    http://www.kekoolani.org/Pages/Kekoolani%20Genealogy%20Database%20(PAF)/pafg70.htm
    Kekoolani Genealogy of the Descendants of the Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii

    ——————————————————————————–

    Albert Keli’inohala Makekau [Parents] 1 was born on 19 Apr 1885 in Lahaina, Maui, Hawaii. He died on 12 Nov 1912. He married Rachel Kalauokealoha Saffery.

    Rachel Kalauokealoha Saffery.Rachel married Albert Keli’inohala Makekau.

    They had the following children:

    M i Abel Kelii Makekau was born on 16 Oct 1907. He died on 2 Mar 1984.
    M ii Abel Mahu Makekau 1 was born in 1909 in Lahaina, Maui, Hawaii.

    ——————————————————————————–

    John Duncan 1.John married 2 Lele Kekuhamahamaanaakahekili Makekau.

    Lele Kekuhamahamaanaakahekili Makekau [Parents] 1 was born on 5 Aug 1869 in Lahaina, Maui. She died in 1897. She married 2 John Duncan.

    Other marriages:

    Clark, John
    Duncan, Married: John

    Information excerpted from Family Reunion Book “Hanohano Ka’inoa O Kekoolani”
    May 28-30, 1982
    Descendants of Charles and Lillan Kekoolani
    VIA EMAILfrom Jennifer Makekau (in Kekoolani Library catalog #2049.002)

    They had the following children:

    M i Albert Keli’inohala Makekau was born on 19 Apr 1885. He died on 12 Nov 1912.

    ——————————————————————————–

    Abel Kelii Makekau [Parents] was born on 16 Oct 1907 in Lahaina, Maui, Hawaii. He died on 2 Mar 1984. He married Cecilia Koomea Paki on 6 Jan 1929 in Wailuku, Maui, Hawaii.

    Cecilia Koomea Paki.Cecilia married Abel Kelii Makekau on 6 Jan 1929 in Wailuku, Maui, Hawaii.

    They had the following children:

    M i Albert Kelii Makekau Jr. was born on 27 Apr 1942. He died on 3 Nov 2002.

    ——————————————————————————–

    John Elia 1.John married Harriet “Hattie” (Haliaka) Nahienaena Makekau.

    Additional information from
    EMAIL (Kekoolani Library)
    2049.002 Jeniifer Makekau

    Harriet “Hattie” (Haliaka) Nahienaena Makekau [Parents] 1 was born on 5 Aug 1852 in Lahaina, Maui. She died on 11 Nov 1915. She married John Elia.

    Other marriages:

    Mahoe, Charles Keaokalani

    Information excerpted from Family Reunion Book “Hanohano Ka’inoa O Kekoolani”
    May 28-30, 1982
    Descendants of Charles and Lillan Kekoolani
    VIA EMAILfrom Jennifer Makekau (in Kekoolani Library catalog #2049.002)

    ——————————————————————————–

    Charles Keaokalani Mahoe 1.Charles married Harriet “Hattie” (Haliaka) Nahienaena Makekau about 1888.

    Additional information from
    EMAIL (Kekoolani Library)
    2049.002 Jeniifer Makekau

    Harriet “Hattie” (Haliaka) Nahienaena Makekau [Parents] 1 was born on 5 Aug 1852 in Lahaina, Maui. She died on 11 Nov 1915. She married Charles Keaokalani Mahoe about 1888.

    Other marriages:

    Elia, John

    Information excerpted from Family Reunion Book “Hanohano Ka’inoa O Kekoolani”
    May 28-30, 1982
    Descendants of Charles and Lillan Kekoolani
    VIA EMAILfrom Jennifer Makekau (in Kekoolani Library catalog #2049.002)

    ——————————————————————————–

    Jimmy Malaea 1.Jimmy married Malie Akahiakuleana Makekau.

    Additional information from
    EMAIL (Kekoolani Library)
    2049.002 Jeniifer Makekau

    Malie Akahiakuleana Makekau [Parents] 1 was born on 1 Jan 1857 in Lahaina, Maui. She died about 1890. She married Jimmy Malaea.

    Other marriages:

    Ako, (A Russian)

    Information excerpted from Family Reunion Book “Hanohano Ka’inoa O Kekoolani”
    May 28-30, 1982
    Descendants of Charles and Lillan Kekoolani
    VIA EMAILfrom Jennifer Makekau (in Kekoolani Library catalog #2049.002)

    ——————————————————————————–

    Kalehunui (Kalehunui, Ka-lehe-nui-a-Maweke) (Chief of Ko’olau, O’ahu) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4.(Chief married Kahinao (Kahinalo, Kahinalu).

    Kalehunui is the name given by S.M. Kamakau. Ka-lehe-nui-a-Maweke is the name used by S.M. Kamakau in “Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii’.

    Kahinao (Kahinalo, Kahinalu) 1, 2, 3, 4. married Kalehunui (Kalehunui, Ka-lehe-nui-a-Maweke) (Chief of Ko’olau, O’ahu).

    Kahinao is a name used by S.M. Kamakau. Kahinalo is the name used by S.M. Kamakau in “Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii’.

    They had the following children:

    F i Hinakaimauliawa (Hina-kai-mauli-‘awa) (Chief of Ko’olau, O’ahu).

    ——————————————————————————–

    Ako (A Russian) 1.(A married Malie Akahiakuleana Makekau.

    Other marriages:

    Kukiiahu (Ku-kii-ahu), H.H. Princess

    Malie Akahiakuleana Makekau [Parents] 1 was born on 1 Jan 1857 in Lahaina, Maui. She died about 1890. She married Ako (A Russian).

    Other marriages:

    Malaea, Jimmy

    Information excerpted from Family Reunion Book “Hanohano Ka’inoa O Kekoolani”
    May 28-30, 1982
    Descendants of Charles and Lillan Kekoolani
    VIA EMAILfrom Jennifer Makekau (in Kekoolani Library catalog #2049.002)

    ——————————————————————————–

    David Kalaiohauola (Hauola) Makekau [Parents] 1, 2 was born on 25 Jun 1855 in Wahiawa, Kauai, Hi. He died on 4 Jul 1937 in Lahaina, Maui. He married Lahela Palkiko about 1879 in Lahaina, Maui, Hawaii.

    Other marriages:

    Kailipalahe,
    Kaikuahine, Kaleihulumamo (Kaleihulumamoikapoliohiiaka Kaikuahine)

    Information excerpted from Family Reunion Book “Hanohano Ka’inoa O Kekoolani”
    May 28-30, 1982
    Descendants of Charles and Lillan Kekoolani
    VIA EMAILfrom Jennifer Makekau (in Kekoolani Library catalog #2049.002)

    Lahela Palkiko 1 was born on 1 Aug 1911. She married David Kalaiohauola (Hauola) Makekau about 1879 in Lahaina, Maui, Hawaii.

    Additional information from
    EMAIL (Kekoolani Library)
    2049.002 Jeniifer Makekau

    ——————————————————————————–

    David Kalaiohauola (Hauola) Makekau [Parents] 1, 2 was born on 25 Jun 1855 in Wahiawa, Kauai, Hi. He died on 4 Jul 1937 in Lahaina, Maui. He married Kailipalahe.

    Other marriages:

    Palkiko, Lahela
    Kaikuahine, Kaleihulumamo (Kaleihulumamoikapoliohiiaka Kaikuahine)

    Information excerpted from Family Reunion Book “Hanohano Ka’inoa O Kekoolani”
    May 28-30, 1982
    Descendants of Charles and Lillan Kekoolani
    VIA EMAILfrom Jennifer Makekau (in Kekoolani Library catalog #2049.002)

    Kailipalahe 1. married David Kalaiohauola (Hauola) Makekau.

  10. Renee says:

    Soundex Code for Makekau = M220
    Other surnames sharing this Soundex Code:
    MACCOISE | MAYCOCK | MCCAIG | MCCOACH | MCCOOK | MCCOSH | MCCOUCH | MCGAUGHEY | MCGEOUGH | MCGOUGH | MCHUGH | MCKAGUE | MESSICK | MEZICK | MICHAUX | MOSES | MUSICK |

    *The PARROTT ( Perot) *
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macaw

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McCall's

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marvin_Pierce
    Father of Barbara Bush ?

  11. Renee says:

    http://www.kekoolani.org/Pages/Kekoolani%20Genealogy%20Database%20(PAF)/pafg70.htm#907

    *Does Jill KELLY know them ?
    Soundex Code for Kelii = K400
    Other surnames sharing this Soundex Code:
    KAHL | KAHLE | KAHLEY | KALL | KEALEY | KEALY | KEEL | KEELE | KEELEY | KEELY | KEHL | KEIL | KELL | KELLAWAY | KELLEY | KELLOWAY | KELLY | KIEL | KIELY | KILE | KILEY | KILLEY | KOELLE | KOHL | KOOL | KUEHL | KUHL | KULL | KYLE

  12. Renee says:

    http://www.kekoolani.org/Pages/Kekoolani%20Genealogy%20Database%20(PAF)/index2.htm

    http://www.kekoolani.org/Pages/Kekoolani%20Genealogy%20Database%20(PAF)/index3.htm#Brown
    Brown
    Brown, Amy Leiokekoolani b.1987
    Brown, Gregory Kahiwa b.1946
    Brown, Kapena J.H.
    Brown, Lehi Wilfred Kekoolani b.1962
    Brown, Mary Agnes Kuualoha b.1944
    Brown, Nephi Peleiholani Chiyonofuji b.1992
    Brown, Nephi Pomaikai b.1961
    Brown, Wilfred Kuualoha m.1954

    Gregory Kahiwa Brown [Parents] was born on 14 Aug 1946 in Honolulu, Hawaii. He married Marian Cardani.

    Marian Cardani.Marian married Gregory Kahiwa Brown.

    ——————————————————————————–

    Brunson Ah Sam Kaonohi Young [Parents] was born on 29 Dec 1966 in Honolulu, Hawaii. He married Shana Hokulani Rocha on 26 Jun 1993 in Hilo, Hawaii.

    Shana Hokulani Rocha was born on 25 Mar 1991 in Hilo, Hawaii. She married Brunson Ah Sam Kaonohi Young on 26 Jun 1993 in Hilo, Hawaii.

    They had the following children:

    F i Ariel Young was born on 25 Mar 1991 in Hilo, Hawaii.

    ——————————————————————————–

    Nawai Hal Chartrand [Parents] was born on 25 Jul 1959 in Honolulu, Hawaii. He married Antoinetter Kealaokapikake Amana on 22 Oct 1978 in Hilo, Hawaii.

    Antoinetter Kealaokapikake Amana.Antoinetter married Nawai Hal Chartrand on 22 Oct 1978 in Hilo, Hawaii.

    ——————————————————————————–

    Uwao Chandler Chartrand [Parents] was born on 24 Nov 1960 in Honolulu, Hawaii. He married Nadine Napua Tanaka on 12 Nov 1978 in Hilo, Hawaii.

    Nadine Napua Tanaka was born on 26 Aug 1958 in Hilo, Hawaii. She married Uwao Chandler Chartrand on 12 Nov 1978 in Hilo, Hawaii.

    They had the following children:

    M i Chandler Pukonakona Minoru Chartrand was born on 27 Oct 1978 in Hilo, Hawaii.
    F ii Natasha Alohakuupuaokolani Mayling Chartrand was born on 8 Jun 1980 in Hilo, Hawaii.
    F iii Leiohoolokoonipaa Talia Chartrand was born on 23 Jun 1987 in Hilo, Hawaii.
    M iv Kalawai Edward Chartrand was born on 18 Feb 1991 in Hilo, Hawaii.

    ——————————————————————————–

    Kamekona 1 was born in Ka’u, Hawaii, Hawaii. He married Kaiahua Opunui.

    Kaiahua Opunui [Parents].Kaiahua married Kamekona.

    They had the following children:

    F i Kalala Kamekona.
    F ii Rosalie Kaiahua Kamekona (Lokalia).
    U iii Hukiku Kamekona.

    ——————————————————————————–

    Toko Sr..Sr. married Kalala Kamekona.

    Kalala Kamekona [Parents] 1.Kalala married Toko Sr..

    They had the following children:

    F i Mary Toko (Mrs. Sagawa).
    M ii John Toko (Sr.).
    F iii Hannah Toko.
    U iv Pula Toko.
    M v (Unknown son) Toko.

    Removed form family at birth.
    U vi Matsu Toko.
    M vii Daniel Toko.

    ——————————————————————————–

    David Kepa Napalapalei.David married Rosalie Kaiahua Kamekona (Lokalia).

    Rosalie Kaiahua Kamekona (Lokalia) [Parents] 1.Rosalie married David Kepa Napalapalei.

    They had the following children:

    F i Rosalia Napalapalai.
    U ii Milae Kepa Napalapalai 1.
    U iii Moohila Napalapalai 1.
    U iv Haleakala Napalapalai

    ***NOTE***
    Antoinetter Kealaokapikake Amana.Antoinetter married Nawai Hal Chartrand on 22 Oct 1978 in Hilo, Hawaii.

    ——————————————————————————–

    Uwao Chandler Chartrand [Parents] was born on 24 Nov 1960 in Honolulu, Hawaii. He married Nadine Napua Tanaka on 12 Nov 1978 in Hilo, Hawaii.

    Nadine Napua Tanaka was born on 26 Aug 1958 in Hilo, Hawaii. She married Uwao Chandler Chartrand on 12 Nov 1978 in Hilo, Hawaii.

    They had the following children:

    M i Chandler Pukonakona Minoru Chartrand was born on 27 Oct 1978 in Hilo, Hawaii.
    F ii Natasha Alohakuupuaokolani Mayling Chartrand was born on 8 Jun 1980 in Hilo, Hawaii.
    F iii Leiohoolokoonipaa Talia Chartrand was born on 23 Jun 1987 in Hilo, Hawaii.
    M iv Kalawai Edward Chartrand was born on 18 Feb 1991 in Hilo, Hawaii.

  13. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloomsbury_Group
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karin_Stephen
    Karin Stephen (née Costelloe) (1890–1953) was a British psychoanalyst and psychologist.

    Karin Stephen was educated at Newnham College, Cambridge, where she became a Fellow. She married Adrian Stephen shortly before World War I; the couple, as conscientious objectors, spent the war working on a dairy farm. After the war, the couple trained as doctors and then went into analysis with James Glover; when he died in 1926, Karin continued with Sylvia Payne. Accepted as an associate member of the British Psychoanalytical Society in 1927, she became a full member in 1931.[1]

    Stephen entered private practice as a psychoanalyst. She gave the first lecture course on psychoanalysis ever given at Cambridge University: the course of six lectures was repeated over several years, and formed the basis of her medical textbook Psychoanalysis and medicine.[2] She suffered from deafness and manic depression. After her husband died in 1948, her health deteriorated and she committed suicide in 1953.[1]

    Her papers are held in the archives of the British Psychoanalytical Society

    • Renee says:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sylvia_Payne
      Sylvia Payne (6 November 1880 — 30 May 1976) was one of the pioneers of psychoanalysis in the United Kingdom.

      Born as Sylvia May Moore in Marylebone, London, the daughter of Rev. Edward William Moore and his wife Letitia. Her father was incumbent of Brunswick Chapel[1] and an adherent of the Higher Life movement, being one of the founders of the Keswick Convention. The family later lived at Wimbledon. Moore was educated at Wimbledon High School, Westfield College (University of London) and the London School of Medicine for Women – later the Royal Free Hospital. She qualified in 1906 and held house appointments at the Royal Free Hospital until her marriage in 1908.[2]

      During the First World War Payne became commandant and medical officer in Torquay at the Red Cross Hospital for wounded soldiers. In 1918, she was awarded the CBE for her work.[2]

      Rev. Edward William Moore[edit] Psychoanalytic careerPayne developed an interest in psychoanalysis during the war and began training with Edward Glover at the Brunswick Square Clinic in London. She went to Berlin, where she underwent analysis with Hans Sachs and got to know Karl Abraham. In 1922, Payne became an Associate Member of the British Psychoanalytical Society. In 1926 she became a psychiatrist at Ernest Jones’ London Clinic of Psychoanalysis (later the Institute of Psychoanalysis) and a Member of the Society. Payne was strong advocate for psychoanalysis and a prolific writer on psychoanalysis and women. Jones put her in charge of administration at the Society, where she was very effective. In 1929 she was joint secretary with Joan Riviere in the International Congress in Oxford. Payne was the analyst for Marion Milner[3] and Charles Rycroft,[4] among others.

      Between 1941 and 1945, she played an important part in the Controversial discussions as one of the moderators between Melanie Klein and Anna Freud. She organised a stenographer to record the discussion accurately, so members who could not get to London because of war work could be kept in touch. At the same time, there was a constitutional debate within the society centering around Edward Glover. The result was that Glover resigned from society and Anna Freud resigned from the training committee.

      In 1944 Payne was elected as president of the Society, with Ernest Jones as honorary president. Payne was in charge of discussions on training, with an ad hoc committee including John Bowlby, Anna Freud, Willi Hoffer, Melanie Klein, Susan Isaacs, Adrian Stephen and John Rickman.;[5] and as ‘three separately angled trainings arose'[6] emerged as a leading member of the Independent Group. She ceased to be president in 1947 but was president of the BPAS again from 1954 to 1956. In 1962, she was elected an honorary member of the BPAS. She was also a Fellow of the British Psychological Society.[2]

      [edit] Personal lifeIn 1908 she married John Ernest Payne, a surgeon who had rowed for Cambridge in the Boat Race in 1899 and 1900, and stroked the winning Leander Club four in the Stewards’ Challenge Cup at Henley Royal Regatta in 1900. One son Kenneth Payne became an Olympic rower, and another Anthony Monck-Mason Payne became a professor of medicine at Yale University and an Assistant Director of WHO.[7] Her brother, Henry Monck-Mason Moore, was Governor General of Ceylon.

      John Earnest Payne[edit] DeathSylvia Payne lived in retirement in Tunbridge Wells, where she died at the age of 95

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oliver_Hazard_Payne

      • Renee says:

        *NOTE* MOORE***
        Bunny MELLON’s daughter was married to Viscount MOORE* (For a while)

        *GILLette*
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rachel_Lambert_Mellon

        *NOTE* STEWART*
        (He looks like GORDON BROWN)**
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dudley_Moore
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kelly-Moore_Paints
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohamed_Morsi
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gordon_Brown
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sylvia_Browne
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Brown
        James Brown was born in Barnwell, South Carolina on May 3, 1933, to Susie (née Behlings) Brown (August 8, 1916 – February 26, 2004)[18] and Joseph (“Joe”) Gardner (March 29, 1911 – July 10, 1993) (who changed his surname to Brown after Mattie Brown who raised him).[18] Although Brown was to be named after his father Joseph, his first and middle names were mistakenly reversed on his birth certificate. He therefore became James Joseph Brown, Jr.[1] As a young child, Brown was called Junior. When he later lived with his aunt and cousin, he was called Little Junior since his cousin’s nickname was also Junior.[1] Later as an adult, Brown legally changed his name to remove the “Jr.” designation. Brown claimed to have African, Chinese and Native American ancestry.[19][20]

        As a young child, Brown and his family lived in extreme poverty[11] in nearby Elko, South Carolina, which at the time was an impoverished town in Barnwell County. When Brown was two years old, his parents separated after his mother left his father for another man.[21] After his mother abandoned the family, Brown continued to live with his father and his father’s live-in girlfriends until he was six years old. His father then sent him to live with an aunt, who ran a house of prostitution.[22] Even though Brown lived with relatives, he spent long stretches of time on his own, hanging out on the streets and hustling to get by.[11] Brown managed to stay in school until he dropped out in the seventh grade.[23] During his childhood, Brown earned money shining shoes, sweeping out stores, selling and trading in old stamps, washing cars and dishes and singing in talent contests.[11] Brown also performed buck dances for change to entertain troops from Camp Gordon at the start of World War II as their convoys traveled over a canal bridge near his aunt’s home.[21][22] Between earning money from these adventures, Brown taught himself to play a harmonica given to him by his father.[21] He learned to play some guitar from Tampa Red, in addition to learning to play piano and drums from others he met during this time.[21] Brown was inspired to become an entertainer after watching Louis Jordan, a popular jazz and R&B performer during the 1940s, and Jordan’s Tympany Five performing “Caldonia” in a short film.[24]

        Brown began his performing career at the age of 12, forming his first vocal group, the Cremona Trio in 1945, where they won local talent shows at Augusta concert halls such as the Lenox and Harlem theaters.[6] As a result of this success, the group would later gig at several high schools and local army bases.[6] At the age of sixteen, he was convicted of armed robbery and sent to a juvenile detention center upstate in Toccoa in 1949.[8] While in prison, he formed a gospel quartet with fellow cell mates Johnny Terry, “Hucklebuck” Davis and a person named “Shag”, and made homemade instruments – a comb and paper, a washtub bass, a drum kit made from lard tubs and for Brown, what he called “a sort of mandolin [made] out of a wooden box.”[6] Due to the latter instrument, Brown was given his first nickname, “Music Box”. In 1952, while still in reform school, Brown met future R&B legend Bobby Byrd, who was there playing baseball against the reform school team. Byrd saw Brown perform there and admired his singing and performing talent.[21] As a result of this friendship, Byrd’s family helped Brown secure an early release on June 14, 1952 after serving three years of his sentence. The authorities agreed to release Brown on the condition that he would get a job and not return to Augusta or Richmond County and also under the condition he find a decent job and sing for the Lord as he had promised in his parole letter. After stints as a boxer[25] and baseball pitcher in semi-professional baseball (a career move ended by a leg injury), Brown turned his energy toward music.

        • Renee says:

          *NOTE* MOORE*
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_Moore_Hubbard
          Alice Moore Hubbard (June 7, 1861 – May 7, 1915) was a noted American feminist, writer, and, with her husband, Elbert Hubbard was a leading figure in the Roycroft movement – a branch of the Arts and Crafts Movement in England with which it was contemporary.

          Born Alice Luann Moore in Wales, New York to Welcome Moore and Melinda Bush, she was a schoolteacher before meeting her future husband, the married soap salesman and philosopher Elbert Hubbard whom she married in 1904 after a controversial affair in which she bore the illegitimate, Miriam Elberta Hubbard (1894–1985).

          Her works include Justinian and Theodora (1906; with Elbert Hubbard), Woman’s Work (1908), Life Lessons (1909), and The Basis of Marriage (1910). The latter includes an interview with Alice Hubbard by Sophie Irene Loeb.

          The couple perished in the sinking of the RMS Lusitania during the First World War while on a voyage to Europe to cover the war and ultimately interview Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany.[citation needed]

          [edit] See also Biography portal
          United States portal
          Feminism portal
          Bertha Crawford Hubbard
          East Aurora, New York
          [edit] External links”Alice Moore Hubbard”. Find a Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=8388269. Retrieved September 14, 2010.
          Alice Hubbard’s biography at The Lusitania Resource

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elbert_Hubbard
          Elbert Green Hubbard (June 19, 1856 – May 7, 1915) was an American writer, publisher, artist, and philosopher. Raised in Hudson, Illinois, he met early success as a traveling salesman with the Larkin soap company. Today Hubbard is mostly known as the founder of the Roycroft artisan community in East Aurora, New York, an influential exponent of the Arts and Crafts Movement. Among his many publications were the nine-volume work Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great and the short story A Message to Garcia. He and his second wife, Alice Moore Hubbard, died aboard the RMS Lusitania, which was sunk by a German submarine off the coast of Ireland on May 7, 1915.
          (1856-06-19)June 19, 1856
          Bloomington, Illinois, U.S.
          Died May 7, 1915(1915-05-07) (aged 58)
          Aboard the torpedoed RMS Lusitania in the Atlantic Ocean 11 miles (18 km) off the Old Head of Kinsale, Ireland
          Occupation Writer, publisher, artist, philosopher
          Spouse(s) Bertha Crawford Hubbard (divorced); Alice Moore Hubbard (1904–1915) (their death)
          Children Elbert Hubbard II (1882–1970), Sanford Hubbard (1887–1955), Ralph Hubbard (1885–1980) and Catherine (née Hubbard) Bryan (1896–1961) by Bertha; Miriam Elberta Hubbard (1894–1985) by Alice

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L._Ron_Hubbard
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientology
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_Org

  14. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adrian_Stephen
    Adrian Stephen (1883–1948) was a member of the Bloomsbury Group, an author and psychoanalyst, and the brother of Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell. He and his wife became interested in the work of Sigmund Freud, and were among the first British psychoanalysts.

    Stephen, educated at Westminster School, was the youngest of four children of Leslie Stephen; their father’s death in 1904 resulted in the four siblings moving to Bloomsbury, and their house there became the nucleus of the Bloomsbury Group. By his mother’s first marriage, he was also a half-brother of George and Gerald Duckworth.

    Among his romantic liaisons was his affair with the artist Duncan Grant, which led to Grant’s introduction to, and eventual unusual romance with, Stephen’s sister Vanessa Bell. In 1914 Stephen married Karin Costelloe, a philosophy graduate and expert on Bergson. On the introduction of conscription in 1916 during World War I Stephen became a conscientious objector, like many other members of the Bloomsbury Group, and, with Costelloe, lived out the remainder of the war working on a farm in Essex.

    Following the war they became interested in psychoanalysis, training medically at the request of Ernest Jones and later with James Glover, and becoming qualified in the late 1920s.

    In 1936 Stephen decided to recount in detail the Dreadnought hoax, in which he had taken part a quarter of a century earlier, completing an account published by Hogarth press.

    In World War II Stephen became so angered by the Nazis’ brutality and anti-semitism that he abandoned his pacifist stance of the previous war and volunteered to become an army doctor at the age of 60 in 1942, shortly after his sister Virginia’s suicide. He died in 1948.

    Bloomsbury and Psychoanalysis

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oliver_Wendell_Holmes,_Jr.

  15. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leslie_Stephen

    Sir Leslie Stephen, KCB (28 November 1832 – 22 February 1904) was an English author, critic and mountaineer, and the father of Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell.

    Contents [hide]
    1 Life
    2 Literary career
    3 Mountaineering
    4 Works
    5 References
    6 External links

    [edit] LifeStephen was born at Kensington Gore in London, the brother of James Fitzjames Stephen and son of Sir James Stephen. His family had belonged to the Clapham Sect, the early 19th century group of mainly evangelical Christian social reformers. At his father’s house he saw a good deal of the Macaulays, James Spedding, Sir Henry Taylor and Nassau Senior. After studying at Eton College, King’s College London and Trinity Hall, Cambridge, where he graduated B.A. (20th wrangler) in 1854 and M.A. in 1857, Stephen remained for several years a fellow and tutor of his college.[1] He recounted some of his experiences in a chapter in his Life of Fawcett as well as in some less formal Sketches from Cambridge: By a Don (1865). These sketches were reprinted from the Pall Mall Gazette, to the proprietor of which, George Smith, he had been introduced by his brother. It was at Smith’s house at Hampstead that Stephen met his first wife, Harriet Marian (1840–1875), daughter of William Makepeace Thackeray, with whom he had a daughter, Laura Makepeace Stephen (1870–1945); after her death he married Julia Prinsep Jackson (1846–1895), widow of Herbert Duckworth. With her he had four children:

    Vanessa (1879–1961) married Clive Bell
    Thoby (1880–1906)
    Virginia (1882–1941) married Leonard Woolf
    Adrian (1883–1948)
    In the 1850s, Stephen and his brother James Fitzjames Stephen were invited by Frederick Denison Maurice to lecture at The Working Men’s College. Leslie Stephen became a member of the College’s governing College Corporation.[2] He died in Kensington.

    [edit] Literary career
    Leslie Stephen (1902)
    by George Charles BeresfordWhile at Cambridge, Stephen became an Anglican clergyman. In 1865, having renounced his religious beliefs, and after a visit to the United States two years earlier, where he had formed lasting friendships with Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., James Russell Lowell and Charles Eliot Norton, he settled in London and became a journalist, eventually editing the Cornhill Magazine in 1871 where R.L. Stevenson, Thomas Hardy, W.E. Norris, Henry James and James Payn figured among his contributors.

    In his spare time, he participated in athletics and mountaineering. He also contributed to the Saturday Review, Fraser, Macmillan, the Fortnightly and other periodicals. He was already known as a climber, as a contributor to Peaks, Passes and Glaciers (1862), and as one of the earliest presidents of the Alpine Club, when in 1871, in commemoration of his own first ascents in the Alps, he published The Playground of Europe, which immediately became a mountaineering classic, drawing – together with Whymper’s Scrambles Amongst the Alps – successive generations of its readers to the Alps.

    During the eleven years of his editorship, in addition to three volumes of critical studies, he made two valuable contributions to philosophical history and theory. The first was The History of English Thought in the Eighteenth Century (1876 and 1881). This work was generally recognized as an important addition to philosophical literature and led immediately to Stephen’s election at the Athenaeum Club in 1877. The second was The Science of Ethics (1882). It was extensively adopted as a textbook on the subject and made him the best-known proponent of evolutionary ethics in late nineteenth-century Britain.

    Stephen also served as the first editor (1885–91) of the Dictionary of National Biography

    ***NOTE***
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Payn

  16. Renee says:

    Another combination of the name KING*
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baron_Kingsale
    Baron Kingsale is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It dates to the thirteenth century, perhaps being created circa 1223, though other sources give different dates. The first creation was by writ. The title was officially confirmed by letters patent in 1397. The numbering of the barons varies, some sources including the holders of the ancient barony, others commencing with the barons confirmed by letters patent.

    The Baron also holds the feudal titles of Lord Courcy and Lord Ringrone, probably created in the twelfth century. Several sources claim that the Baron holds the privilege of being covered (that is, wearing a hat) in the presence of the monarch. The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica, however, disagrees, claiming that the story “is a legend without historic foundation”.[1]

    [edit] Barons Kingsale (c. 1223)Miles de Courcy, 1st Baron Kingsale (d. c. 1230)
    Patrick de Courcy, 2nd Baron Kingsale (d. c. 1260)
    Nicholas de Courcy, 3rd Baron Kingsale (d. c. 1290)
    Edmund de Courcy, 4th Baron Kingsale (d. c. 1302)
    John de Courcy, 5th Baron Kingsale (d. c. 1303)
    Miles de Courcy, 6th Baron Kingsale (d. c. 1338)
    Miles de Courcy, 7th Baron Kingsale (d. 1358)
    John de Courcy, 8th Baron Kingsale (d. c. 1387)
    William de Courcy, 9th Baron Kingsale (d. c. 1410) (became Baron Kingsale by letters patent in 1397)
    [edit] Barons Kingsale (1397)William de Courcy, 9th Baron Kingsale (d. c. 1410)
    Nicholas de Courcy, 10th Baron Kingsale (d. c. 1430)
    Patrick de Courcy, 11th Baron Kingsale (d. c. 1460)
    Nicholas de Courcy, 12th Baron Kingsale (d. 1476)
    James de Courcy, 13th Baron Kingsale (d. c. 1499)
    Edmond de Courcy, 14th Baron Kingsale (d. c. 1505)
    David de Courcy, 15th Baron Kingsale (d. c. 1520)
    John de Courcy, 16th Baron Kingsale (d. 1535)
    Gerald de Courcy, 17th Baron Kingsale (d. 1599)
    John de Courcy, 18th Baron Kingsale (d. 1628)
    Gerald de Courcy, 19th Baron Kingsale (d. 1642)
    Patrick de Courcy, 20th Baron Kingsale (d. 1663)
    John de Courcy, 21st Baron Kingsale (d. 1667)
    Patrick de Courcy, 22nd Baron Kingsale (c. 1660–1669)
    Almericus de Courcy, 23rd Baron Kingsale (c. 1664–1720)
    Gerald de Courcy, 24th Baron Kingsale (1700–1759)
    John de Courcy, 25th Baron Kingsale (c. 1717–1776)
    John de Courcy, 26th Baron Kingsale (d. 1822)
    Thomas de Courcy, 27th Baron Kingsale (1774–1832)
    John Stapleton de Courcy, 28th Baron Kingsale (1805–1847)
    John Constantine de Courcy, 29th Baron Kingsale (1827–1865)
    Michael Conrad de Courcy, 30th Baron Kingsale (1828–1874)
    John Fitzroy de Courcy, 31st Baron Kingsale (1821–1890)
    Michael William de Courcy, 32nd Baron Kingsale (1822–1895)
    Michael Constantine de Courcy, 33rd Baron Kingsale (1855–1931)
    Michael William Robert de Courcy, 34th Baron Kingsale (1882–1969)
    John de Courcy, 35th Baron Kingsale (1941–2005)
    Nevinson Mark de Courcy, 36th Baron Kingsale (b. 1958)
    The presumptive heir is Joseph Kenneth Charles de Courcy (b. 1955)

  17. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baron_de_Ros
    Baron de Ros (pronounced “Roose”) is the most ancient baronial title in the Peerage of England. (The spelling of the title and of the surname of the original holders has been rendered differently in various texts. The word “Ros” is sometimes spelt “Roos”, and the word “de” is sometimes dropped.)

    The Barony was created by writ in 1264; no other English title predates it unless one accepts certain doubtful contentions about the title of Earl of Arundel. The only older peerage titles in the British Isles are: Baron Kerry and Lixnaw (1181, held by the Marquess of Lansdowne), Baron Offaly (1199, later creation held by the Duke of Leinster), and Baron Kingsale (circa 1223) in the Peerage of Ireland, and Earl of Mar (predates 1115) and Earl of Sutherland (1230) in the Peerage of Scotland.

    Whenever a man holds the title, he is styled the Premier Baron of England. However, whenever a woman holds the title, the holder of the next-highest barony held by a man is known as the Premier Baron. For instance, when Georgiana Maxwell, the most recent female to hold the title, was Baroness, the Lord Mowbray, Segrave, and Stourton was considered the Premier Baron.

    [edit] RemainderThe Barony may pass to heirs-general rather than just heirs-male, unlike most British titles. The barony may pass to daughters only if there are no sons. Under inheritance law, sisters have an equal right to inherit; there is no special inheritance right due for an eldest sister, as there is for an eldest son. Thus, it is possible that two or more sisters (and their heirs after their deaths) have an equally valid claim to the title; in such a case, the title goes into abeyance. The abeyance ends either when there is only one remaining claimant due to deaths of the other claimants, or when the Sovereign “terminates” the abeyance in favour of one of the heirs. The peerage has been held by a woman six times, more than any other peerage except that of Baron Willoughby de Eresby.

    [edit] DescentThe title was originally held by the de Ros family until the death of the eleventh Baron in 1508, when it was inherited by his nephew, Sir George Manners. His son, Thomas, inherited the barony and was later created Earl of Rutland. The barony and earldom remained united until the death of the third Earl, Edward Manners. The barony was then inherited by his only daughter, Elizabeth, while the earldom passed to a male heir, his younger brother. Upon the death of Elizabeth’s only son, William Cecil, the title returned to the Manners family, being inherited by the sixth Earl of Rutland.

    Again, upon the sixth Earl’s death, the barony and earldom were separated (the earldom being inherited by a distant cousin, the great-nephew of the 2nd earl), as the barony was inherited by the Earl’s daughter Katherine, who had married George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham. Katherine’s son George inherited both the barony and the dukedom, but upon his death the dukedom became extinct and the barony went into abeyance.

    The barony had been in abeyance for over a century when Charlotte Boyle Walsingham (who was later to marry Lord Henry FitzGerald, a son of the 4th Duke of Leinster) petitioned King George III to terminate the abeyance in her favour in 1790. (She was the daughter of Robert Boyle-Walsingham by his wife Charlotte, daughter of Sir Charles Hanbury Williams by his wife Frances, daughter of Thomas Coningsby, 1st Earl Coningsby by his wife Frances, daughter of Richard Jones, 1st Earl of Ranelagh by his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Francis Willoughby, 5th Baron Willoughby of Parham, son of William Willoughby, 3rd Baron Willoughby of Parham by his wife Frances, daughter of John Manners, 4th Earl of Rutland who was younger brother of the 15th Baron de Ros.[2]) The King referred the matter to the House of Lords, which recommended that the barony remain in abeyance. However, in 1806, the Prince Regent terminated the abeyance in her favour on the recommendation of his Prime Minister. Charlotte and her heirs then took the additional surname of “de Ros” after “FitzGerald”.

    The title eventually went into abeyance again upon the death of Mary Dawson (née Fitzgerald-de Ros), the 25th Baroness, in 1939. The abeyance was terminated in favour of her eldest daughter, Una Ross (née Dawson) in 1943, and again went into abeyance upon her death in 1956. Two years later, the barony was called out of abeyance again for Una Ross’s granddaughter, Georgiana Maxwell (née Ross). Upon Georgiana Maxwell’s death, it was inherited by Peter Maxwell, the first man to hold the title in over three-quarters of a century.

    [edit] Barons de Ros of Helmsley (1264)Robert de Ros, 1st Baron de Ros (d. 1285)
    William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros (d. 1316)
    William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros (d. 1343)
    William de Ros, 4th Baron de Ros (c. 1326–1352)
    Thomas de Ros, 5th Baron de Ros (1336–1384)
    John de Ros, 6th Baron de Ros (c. 1360–1394)
    William de Ros, 7th Baron de Ros (c. 1369–1414)
    John de Ros, 8th Baron de Ros (d. 1421)
    Thomas de Ros, 9th Baron de Ros (c. 1405–1431)
    Thomas de Ros, 10th Baron de Ros (c. 1427–1464) (forfeit 1464)
    Edmund de Ros, 11th Baron de Ros (d. 1508) (restored 1485, barony abeyant in 1508)
    George Manners, 12th Baron de Ros (d. 1513) (abeyance terminated about 1512)
    Thomas Manners, 1st Earl of Rutland, 13th Baron de Ros (d. 1543)
    Henry Manners, 2nd Earl of Rutland, 14th Baron de Ros (1526–1563)
    Edward Manners, 3rd Earl of Rutland, 15th Baron de Ros (1549–1587)
    Elizabeth Cecil, 16th Baroness de Ros (c. 1572–1591)
    William Cecil, 17th Baron de Ros (1590–1618)
    Francis Manners, 6th Earl of Rutland, 18th Baron de Ros (1578–1632)
    Katherine Villiers, Duchess of Buckingham, 19th Baroness de Ros (d. 1649)
    George Villiers, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, 20th Baron de Ros (1628–1687) (barony abeyant 1687)
    Charlotte FitzGerald-de Ros, 21st Baroness de Ros (1769–1831) (abeyance terminated 1806)
    Henry William FitzGerald-de Ros, 22nd Baron de Ros (1793–1839)
    William Lennox Lascelles FitzGerald-de Ros, 23rd Baron de Ros (1797–1874)
    Dudley Charles FitzGerald-de Ros, 24th Baron de Ros (1827–1907)
    Mary Frances Dawson, 25th Baroness de Ros (1854–1939) (abeyant 1939)
    Una Mary Ross, 26th Baroness de Ros (1879–1956) (abeyance terminated 1943; abeyant 1956)
    Georgiana Angela Maxwell, 27th Baroness de Ros (1933–1983) (abeyance terminated 1958)
    Peter Trevor Maxwell, 28th Baron de Ros (b. 1958)
    The heir apparent to the barony is the Hon. Finbar James Maxwell (b. 1988).

    From a modest housing estate, Obama’s stepmother celebrates … http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1081178/From-modest-housing-estate-Obamas-stepm...

    Oct 28, 2008 … Ian Manners, who is divorced from Mr Obama’s half sister Auma, said part of Mr Obama’s success was down to his ability to rise above those …

  18. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baron_de_Ros
    Baron de Ros (pronounced “Roose”) is the most ancient baronial title in the Peerage of England. (The spelling of the title and of the surname of the original holders has been rendered differently in various texts. The word “Ros” is sometimes spelt “Roos”, and the word “de” is sometimes dropped.)

    The Barony was created by writ in 1264; no other English title predates it unless one accepts certain doubtful contentions about the title of Earl of Arundel. The only older peerage titles in the British Isles are: Baron Kerry and Lixnaw (1181, held by the Marquess of Lansdowne), Baron Offaly (1199, later creation held by the Duke of Leinster), and Baron Kingsale (circa 1223) in the Peerage of Ireland, and Earl of Mar (predates 1115) and Earl of Sutherland (1230) in the Peerage of Scotland.

    Whenever a man holds the title, he is styled the Premier Baron of England. However, whenever a woman holds the title, the holder of the next-highest barony held by a man is known as the Premier Baron. For instance, when Georgiana Maxwell, the most recent female to hold the title, was Baroness, the Lord Mowbray, Segrave, and Stourton was considered the Premier Baron.

    [edit] RemainderThe Barony may pass to heirs-general rather than just heirs-male, unlike most British titles. The barony may pass to daughters only if there are no sons. Under inheritance law, sisters have an equal right to inherit; there is no special inheritance right due for an eldest sister, as there is for an eldest son. Thus, it is possible that two or more sisters (and their heirs after their deaths) have an equally valid claim to the title; in such a case, the title goes into abeyance. The abeyance ends either when there is only one remaining claimant due to deaths of the other claimants, or when the Sovereign “terminates” the abeyance in favour of one of the heirs. The peerage has been held by a woman six times, more than any other peerage except that of Baron Willoughby de Eresby.

    [edit] DescentThe title was originally held by the de Ros family until the death of the eleventh Baron in 1508, when it was inherited by his nephew, Sir George Manners. His son, Thomas, inherited the barony and was later created Earl of Rutland. The barony and earldom remained united until the death of the third Earl, Edward Manners. The barony was then inherited by his only daughter, Elizabeth, while the earldom passed to a male heir, his younger brother. Upon the death of Elizabeth’s only son, William Cecil, the title returned to the Manners family, being inherited by the sixth Earl of Rutland.

    Again, upon the sixth Earl’s death, the barony and earldom were separated (the earldom being inherited by a distant cousin, the great-nephew of the 2nd earl), as the barony was inherited by the Earl’s daughter Katherine, who had married George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham. Katherine’s son George inherited both the barony and the dukedom, but upon his death the dukedom became extinct and the barony went into abeyance.

    The barony had been in abeyance for over a century when Charlotte Boyle Walsingham (who was later to marry Lord Henry FitzGerald, a son of the 4th Duke of Leinster) petitioned King George III to terminate the abeyance in her favour in 1790. (She was the daughter of Robert Boyle-Walsingham by his wife Charlotte, daughter of Sir Charles Hanbury Williams by his wife Frances, daughter of Thomas Coningsby, 1st Earl Coningsby by his wife Frances, daughter of Richard Jones, 1st Earl of Ranelagh by his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Francis Willoughby, 5th Baron Willoughby of Parham, son of William Willoughby, 3rd Baron Willoughby of Parham by his wife Frances, daughter of John Manners, 4th Earl of Rutland who was younger brother of the 15th Baron de Ros.[2]) The King referred the matter to the House of Lords, which recommended that the barony remain in abeyance. However, in 1806, the Prince Regent terminated the abeyance in her favour on the recommendation of his Prime Minister. Charlotte and her heirs then took the additional surname of “de Ros” after “FitzGerald”.

    The title eventually went into abeyance again upon the death of Mary Dawson (née Fitzgerald-de Ros), the 25th Baroness, in 1939. The abeyance was terminated in favour of her eldest daughter, Una Ross (née Dawson) in 1943, and again went into abeyance upon her death in 1956. Two years later, the barony was called out of abeyance again for Una Ross’s granddaughter, Georgiana Maxwell (née Ross). Upon Georgiana Maxwell’s death, it was inherited by Peter Maxwell, the first man to hold the title in over three-quarters of a century.

    [edit] Barons de Ros of Helmsley (1264)Robert de Ros, 1st Baron de Ros (d. 1285)
    William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros (d. 1316)
    William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros (d. 1343)
    William de Ros, 4th Baron de Ros (c. 1326–1352)
    Thomas de Ros, 5th Baron de Ros (1336–1384)
    John de Ros, 6th Baron de Ros (c. 1360–1394)
    William de Ros, 7th Baron de Ros (c. 1369–1414)
    John de Ros, 8th Baron de Ros (d. 1421)
    Thomas de Ros, 9th Baron de Ros (c. 1405–1431)
    Thomas de Ros, 10th Baron de Ros (c. 1427–1464) (forfeit 1464)
    Edmund de Ros, 11th Baron de Ros (d. 1508) (restored 1485, barony abeyant in 1508)
    George Manners, 12th Baron de Ros (d. 1513) (abeyance terminated about 1512)
    Thomas Manners, 1st Earl of Rutland, 13th Baron de Ros (d. 1543)
    Henry Manners, 2nd Earl of Rutland, 14th Baron de Ros (1526–1563)
    Edward Manners, 3rd Earl of Rutland, 15th Baron de Ros (1549–1587)
    Elizabeth Cecil, 16th Baroness de Ros (c. 1572–1591)
    William Cecil, 17th Baron de Ros (1590–1618)
    Francis Manners, 6th Earl of Rutland, 18th Baron de Ros (1578–1632)
    Katherine Villiers, Duchess of Buckingham, 19th Baroness de Ros (d. 1649)
    George Villiers, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, 20th Baron de Ros (1628–1687) (barony abeyant 1687)
    Charlotte FitzGerald-de Ros, 21st Baroness de Ros (1769–1831) (abeyance terminated 1806)
    Henry William FitzGerald-de Ros, 22nd Baron de Ros (1793–1839)
    William Lennox Lascelles FitzGerald-de Ros, 23rd Baron de Ros (1797–1874)
    Dudley Charles FitzGerald-de Ros, 24th Baron de Ros (1827–1907)
    Mary Frances Dawson, 25th Baroness de Ros (1854–1939) (abeyant 1939)
    Una Mary Ross, 26th Baroness de Ros (1879–1956) (abeyance terminated 1943; abeyant 1956)
    Georgiana Angela Maxwell, 27th Baroness de Ros (1933–1983) (abeyance terminated 1958)
    Peter Trevor Maxwell, 28th Baron de Ros (b. 1958)
    The heir apparent to the barony is the Hon. Finbar James Maxwell (b. 1988).

    [edit] References^ The British herald; or, Cabinet of armorial bearings of the nobility & gentry of Great Britain & Ireland, from the earliest to the present time: with a complete glossary of heraldic terms: to which is prefixed a History of heraldry, collected and arranged …
    ^ http://www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk/online/content/Ros1299.htm

  19. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_earls
    Order of precedence
    Heraldic representation of the Coronet of a British EarlThe general order of precedence among earls is:

    Earls in the Peerage of England
    Earls in the Peerage of Scotland
    Earls in the Peerage of Great Britain
    Earls in the Peerage of Ireland created before 1801
    Earls in the Peerage of the United Kingdom and Earls in the Peerage of Ireland created after 1801
    [edit] Earls in the Peerage of EnglandThe Earl of Shrewsbury (1442), Earl Talbot (GB 1784) and Earl of Waterford (Ire 1446)
    Charles Chetwynd-Talbot, 22nd Earl of Shrewsbury
    The Earl of Derby (1485)
    Edward Stanley, 19th Earl of Derby
    The Earl of Huntingdon (1529)
    William Hastings-Bass, 17th Earl of Huntingdon
    The Earl of Pembroke (1551) and Montgomery (1605)
    William Herbert, 18th Earl of Pembroke
    The Earl of Devon (1553)
    Hugh Courtenay, 18th Earl of Devon
    The Earl of Lincoln (1572)
    Robert Fiennes-Clinton, 19th Earl of Lincoln
    The Earl of Suffolk (1603) and Berkshire (1626)
    Michael Howard, 21st Earl of Suffolk
    The Earl of Denbigh (1622) and Desmond (Ire 1628)
    Alexander Feilding, 12th Earl of Denbigh
    The Earl of Westmorland (1624)
    Anthony Fane, 16th Earl of Westmorland
    The Earl of Lindsey (1626) and Abingdon (1682)
    Richard Bertie, 14th Earl of Lindsey
    The Earl of Winchelsea (1628) and Nottingham (1681)
    Daniel Finch-Hatton, 17th Earl of Winchilsea
    The Earl of Sandwich (1660)
    John Montagu, 11th Earl of Sandwich
    The Earl of Essex (1661)
    Paul Capell, 11th Earl of Essex
    The Earl of Carlisle (1661)
    George Howard, 13th Earl of Carlisle
    The Earl of Shaftesbury (1672)
    Nicholas Ashley-Cooper, 12th Earl of Shaftesbury
    The Earl of Portland (1689)
    Tim Bentinck, 12th Earl of Portland
    The Earl of Scarbrough (1690)
    Richard Lumley, 13th Earl of Scarbrough
    The Earl of Albemarle (1697)
    Rufus Keppel, 10th Earl of Albemarle
    The Earl of Coventry (1697)
    George Coventry, 13th Earl of Coventry
    The Earl of Jersey (1697)
    William Villiers, 10th Earl of Jersey
    [edit] Earls in the Peerage of ScotlandNote: The Precedence of the older Scottish earldoms is determined by the Decreet of Ranking of 1606, and not by seniority.
    The Earl of Crawford (1398) and Balcarres (1651)
    Robert Lindsay, 29th Earl of Crawford
    The Earl of Erroll (1453)
    Merlin Hay, 24th Earl of Erroll
    The Countess of Sutherland (1230 or 1275 or 1347)
    Elizabeth Sutherland, 24th Countess of Sutherland
    The Countess of Mar (1114 or 1457)
    Margaret of Mar, 31st Countess of Mar
    The Earl of Rothes (1458)
    James Leslie, 22nd Earl of Rothes
    The Earl of Morton (1458)
    John Douglas, 21st Earl of Morton
    The Earl of Buchan (1469)
    Malcolm Erskine, 17th Earl of Buchan
    The Earl of Eglinton (1508) and Winton (UK 1859)
    Archibald Montgomerie, 18th Earl of Eglinton
    The Earl of Caithness (1455)
    Malcolm Sinclair, 20th Earl of Caithness
    The Earl of Mar and Kellie (1404 or 1565)
    James Erskine, 14th Earl of Mar
    The Earl of Moray (1562)
    John Stuart, 21st Earl of Moray
    The Earl of Home (1605)
    David Douglas-Home, 15th Earl of Home
    The Earl of Perth (1605)
    John Drummond, 9th Earl of Perth
    The Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne (1606)
    Michael Bowes-Lyon, 18th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne
    The Earl of Haddington (1619)
    John Baillie-Hamilton, 13th Earl of Haddington
    The Earl of Galloway (1623)
    Randolph Stewart, 13th Earl of Galloway
    The Earl of Lauderdale (1624)
    Ian Maitland, 18th Earl of Lauderdale
    The Earl of Lindsay (1633)
    James Lindesay-Bethune, 16th Earl of Lindsay
    The Earl of Loudoun (1633)
    Simon Abney-Hastings, 15th Earl of Loudoun
    The Earl of Kinnoull (1633)
    Arthur Hay, 15th Earl of Kinnoull
    The Earl of Elgin (1633) and Kincardine (1643)
    Andrew Bruce, 11th Earl of Elgin
    The Earl of Wemyss (1633) and March (1697)
    James Charteris, 13th Earl of Wemyss
    The Earl of Dalhousie (1633)
    James Ramsay, 17th Earl of Dalhousie
    The Earl of Airlie (1639)
    David Ogilvy, 13th Earl of Airlie
    The Earl of Leven (1641) and Melville (1690)
    Alexander Ian Leslie-Melville, 15th Earl of Leven
    The Earl of Dysart (1643)
    John Grant, 13th Earl of Dysart
    The Earl of Selkirk (1646)
    Presently disclaimed by James Douglas-Hamilton, Baron Selkirk of Douglas
    The Earl of Northesk (1647)
    Patrick Carnegy, 15th Earl of Northesk
    The Earl of Dundee (1660)
    Alexander Scrymgeour, 12th Earl of Dundee
    The Earl of Newburgh (1660)
    Filippo, Prince Rospigliosi, 12th Earl of Newburgh
    The Earl of Annandale and Hartfell (1662)
    Patrick Hope-Johnstone, 11th Earl of Annandale and Hartfell
    The Earl of Dundonald (1669)
    Iain Cochrane, 15th Earl of Dundonald
    The Earl of Kintore (1677)
    James Keith, 14th Earl of Kintore
    The Earl of Dunmore (1686)
    Malcolm Murray, 12th Earl of Dunmore
    The Earl of Orkney (1696)
    Oliver St John, 9th Earl of Orkney
    The Earl of Seafield (1701)
    Ian Ogilvie-Grant, 13th Earl of Seafield
    The Earl of Stair (1703)
    John Dalrymple, 14th Earl of Stair
    The Earl of Rosebery (1703) and Midlothian (UK 1911)
    Neil Primrose, 7th Earl of Rosebery
    The Earl of Glasgow (1703)
    Patrick Boyle, 10th Earl of Glasgow
    [edit] Earls in the Peerage of Great BritainThe Earl Ferrers (1711)
    Robert Shirley, 14th Earl Ferrers
    The Earl of Dartmouth (1711)
    William Legge, 10th Earl of Dartmouth
    The Earl of Tankerville (1714)
    Peter Bennet, 10th Earl of Tankerville
    The Earl of Aylesford (1714)
    Charles Finch-Knightley, 12th Earl of Aylesford
    The Earl of Macclesfield (1721)
    Richard Parker, 9th Earl of Macclesfield
    The Earl Waldegrave (1729)
    James Waldegrave, 13th Earl Waldegrave
    The Earl of Harrington (1742)
    Charles Stanhope, 12th Earl of Harrington
    The Earl of Portsmouth (1743)
    Quentin Wallop, 10th Earl of Portsmouth
    The Earl of Warwick (1759) and Brooke (1746)
    Guy Greville, 9th Earl of Warwick
    The Earl of Buckinghamshire (1746)
    George Hobart-Hampden, 10th Earl of Buckinghamshire
    The Earl of Guilford (1752)
    Piers North, 10th Earl of Guilford
    The Earl of Hardwicke (1754)
    Joseph Yorke, 10th Earl of Hardwicke
    The Earl of Ilchester (1756)
    Robin Fox-Strangways, 10th Earl of Ilchester
    The Earl De La Warr (1761)
    William Sackville, 11th Earl De La Warr
    The Earl of Radnor (1765)
    William Pleydell-Bouverie, 9th Earl of Radnor
    The Earl Spencer (1765)
    Charles Spencer, 9th Earl Spencer
    The Earl Bathurst (1772)
    Allen Bathhurst, 9th Earl Bathurst
    The Earl of Clarendon (1776)
    George Villiers, 8th Earl of Clarendon
    The Earl of Mansfield (1776) and Mansfield (1792)
    William Murray, 8th Earl of Mansfield and Mansfield
    The Earl of Mount Edgcumbe (1789)
    Robert Edgcumbe, 8th Earl of Mount Edgcumbe
    The Earl Fortescue (1789)
    Charles Fortescue, 8th Earl Fortescue
    The Earl of Carnarvon (1793)
    George Herbert, 8th Earl of Carnarvon
    The Earl Cadogan (1800)
    Charles Gerald John Cadogan, 8th Earl Cadogan
    The Earl of Malmesbury (1800)
    James Harris, 7th Earl of Malmesbury
    [edit] Earls in the Peerage of IrelandEarls of Ireland created after 1801 yield precedence to older Earldoms of the United Kingdom
    The Earl of Cork (1620) and Orrery (1660)
    John Boyle, 15th Earl of Cork
    The Earl of Westmeath (1621)
    William Nugent, 13th Earl of Westmeath
    The Earl of Meath (1627)
    John Brabazon, 15th Earl of Meath
    The Earl of Cavan (1647)
    Roger Lambart, 13th Earl of Cavan
    The Earl of Drogheda (1661)
    Derry Moore, 12th Earl of Drogheda
    The Earl of Granard (1684)
    Peter Forbes, 10th Earl of Granard
    The Earl of Darnley (1725)
    Adam Bligh, 11th Earl of Darnley
    The Earl of Bessborough (1739)
    Myles Ponsonby, 12th Earl of Bessborough
    The Earl of Carrick (1748)
    David Butler, 10th Earl of Carrick
    The Earl of Shannon (1756)
    Richard Boyle, 9th Earl of Shannon
    The Earl of Arran (1762)
    Arthur Gore, 9th Earl of Arran
    The Earl of Courtown (1762)
    James Stopford, 9th Earl of Courtown
    The Earl of Mexborough (1766)
    John Savile, 8th Earl of Mexborough
    The Earl Winterton (1766)
    David Turnour, 8th Earl Winterton
    The Earl of Kingston (1768)
    Robert King-Tenison, 12th Earl of Kingston
    The Earl of Roden (1771)
    Robert Jocelyn, 10th Earl of Roden
    The Earl of Lisburne (1776)
    John Vaughan, 8th Earl of Lisburne
    The Earl of Clanwilliam (1776)
    Patrick Meade, 8th Earl of Clanwilliam
    The Earl of Antrim (1785)
    Alexander McDonnell, 9th Earl of Antrim
    The Earl of Longford (1785)
    Thomas Pakenham, 8th Earl of Longford
    The Earl of Portarlington (1785)
    George Dawson-Damer, 7th Earl of Portarlington
    The Earl of Mayo (1785)
    Charles Bourke, 11th Earl of Mayo
    The Earl Annesley (1789)
    Michael Annesley, 12th Earl Annesley
    The Earl of Enniskillen (1789)
    Andrew Cole, 7th Earl of Enniskillen
    The Earl Erne (1789)
    Henry Crichton, 6th Earl Erne
    The Earl of Lucan (1795)
    Richard Bingham, 7th Earl of Lucan (legally dead)
    Heir: George Bingham, Lord Bingham (8th Earl of Lucan)
    The Earl Belmore (1797)
    John Lowry-Corry, 8th Earl Belmore
    The Earl Castle Stewart (1800)
    Arthur Stuart, 8th Earl Castle Stewart
    The Earl of Donoughmore (1800)
    Richard Hely-Hutchinson, 8th Earl of Donoughmore
    The Earl of Caledon (1800)
    Nicholas Alexander, 7th Earl of Caledon
    The Earl of Limerick (1803)
    Edmund Pery, 7th Earl of Limerick
    The Earl of Clancarty (1803)
    Nicholas Le Poer Trench, 9th Earl of Clancarty
    The Earl of Gosford (1806)
    Charles Acheson, 7th Earl of Gosford
    The Earl of Rosse (1806)
    Brendan Parsons, 7th Earl of Rosse
    The Earl of Normanton (1806)
    Shaun Agar, 6th Earl of Normanton
    The Earl of Kilmorey (1822)
    Sir Richard Needham (6th Earl of Kilmory)
    The Earl of Listowel (1822)
    Francis Hare, 6th Earl of Listowel
    The Earl of Norbury (1827)
    Richard Graham-Toler, 7th Earl of Norbury
    The Earl of Ranfurly (1831)
    Gerald Knox, 7th Earl of Ranfurly
    [edit] Earls in the Peerage of the United KingdomPrecedence of Irish Earldoms shown in italics.
    The Earl of Rosslyn (1801)
    The Earl of Craven (1801)
    The Earl of Onslow (1801)
    The Earl of Romney (1801)
    The Earl of Chichester (1801)
    The Earl of Wilton (1801)
    The Earl of Limerick (Ireland)
    The Earl of Clancarty (Ireland)
    The Earl of Powis (1804)
    The Earl Nelson (1805)
    The Earl of Gosford (Ireland)
    The Earl of Rosse (Ireland)
    The Earl of Normanton (Ireland)
    The Earl Grey (1806)
    The Earl of Lonsdale (1807)
    The Earl of Harrowby (1809)
    The Earl of Harewood (1812)
    The Earl of Minto (1813)
    The Earl Cathcart (1814)
    The Earl of Verulam (1815)
    The Earl of Saint Germans (1815)
    The Earl of Morley (1815)
    The Earl of Bradford (1815)
    The Earl of Eldon (1821)
    The Earl Howe (1821)
    The Earl of Stradbroke (1821)
    The Earl Temple of Stowe (1822)
    The Earl of Kilmorey (Ireland)
    The Earl of Listowel (Ireland)
    The Earl of Norbury (Ireland)
    The Earl Cawdor (1827)
    The Earl of Ranfurly (Ireland)
    The Earl of Lichfield (1831)
    The Earl of Durham (1833)
    The Earl Granville (1833)
    The Earl of Effingham (1837)
    The Earl of Ducie (1837)
    The Earl of Yarborough (1837)
    The Earl of Leicester (1837)
    The Earl of Lovelace (1838)
    The Earl of Gainsborough (1841)
    The Earl of Strafford (1847)
    The Earl of Cottenham (1850)
    The Earl Cowley (1857)
    The Earl of Dudley (1860)
    The Earl Russell (1861)
    The Earl of Cromartie (1861)
    The Earl of Kimberley (1866)
    The Earl of Wharncliffe (1876)
    The Earl Cairns (1878)
    The Earl of Lytton (1880)
    The Earl of Selborne (1882)
    The Earl of Iddesleigh (1885)
    The Earl of Cranbrook (1892)
    The Earl of Cromer (1901)
    The Earl of Plymouth (1905)
    The Earl of Liverpool (1905)
    The Earl Saint Aldwyn (1915)
    The Earl Beatty (1919)
    The Earl Haig (1919)
    The Earl of Iveagh (1919)
    The Earl of Balfour (1922)
    The Earl of Oxford and Asquith (1925)
    The Earl Jellicoe (1925)
    The Earl of Inchcape (1929)
    The Earl Peel (1929)[1]
    The Earl Baldwin of Bewdley (1937)
    The Earl of Halifax (1944)
    The Earl of Gowrie (1945)
    The Earl Lloyd George of Dwyfor (1945)
    The Countess Mountbatten of Burma (1947)
    The Earl Alexander of Tunis (1952)
    The Earl of Swinton (1955)
    The Earl Attlee (1955)
    The Earl of Woolton (1956)
    The Earl of Snowdon (1961)
    The Earl of Stockton (1984)
    The Earl of Wessex (1999)[2]

  20. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duke_of_Sutherland
    Duke of Sutherland is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom held by the head of the Leveson-Gower family. It was created by William IV in 1833 for George Leveson-Gower, 2nd Marquess of Stafford. A series of marriages to heiresses by members of the Leveson-Gower family made the Dukes of Sutherland one of the richest landowning families in the United Kingdom.

    The subsidiary titles of the Duke of Sutherland are: Marquess of Stafford (created 1786), Earl Gower (1746), Earl of Ellesmere, of Ellesmere in the County of Shropshire (1846), Viscount Trentham, of Trentham in the County of Stafford (1746), Viscount Brackley, of Brackley in the County of Northampton (1846), and Baron Gower, of Sittenham in the County of York (1703). The marquessate of Stafford, the earldom of Gower and the viscounty of Trentham are in the Peerage of Great Britain, the dukedom, the earldom of Ellesmere and the viscounty of Brackley in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, and the barony of Gower in the Peerage of England. The Duke is also a Baronet, of Sittenham in the County of York, a title created in the Baronetage of England in 1620.[1] Between 1839 and 1963 the Dukes also held the titles of Lord Strathnaver and Earl of Sutherland, both in the Peerage of Scotland. The Scottish titles came into the family through the marriage of the first Duke to Elizabeth Sutherland, 19th Countess of Sutherland.

    Sir Thomas Gower was created a Baronet, of Sittenham in the County of York, by James I in 1620. This title was in the Baronetage of England. His son Thomas, the second Baronet, married Frances, daughter of Sir John Leveson. Their grandson son William, the fourth Baronet (who succeeded his unmarried elder brother), assumed the additional surname of Leveson. Sir William married Lady Jane (d. 1696), daughter of John Granville, 1st Earl of Bath and sister of Grace Carteret, 1st Countess Granville (see Earl Granville). Their son John, the fifth Baronet, was raised to the Peerage of England as Baron Gower, of Sittenham in the County of York, in 1706. His son, the second Baron, served three times as Lord Privy Seal. In 1746 he was created Viscount Trentham, of Trentham in the County of Stafford, and Earl Gower. Both titles are in the Peerage of Great Britain. His eldest surviving son from his first marriage, Granville, the second Earl, was also a prominent politician. In 1786 he was created Marquess of Stafford in the Peerage of Great Britain. Lord Stafford married secondly Lady Louisa Egerton, daughter of Scroop Egerton, 1st Duke of Bridgewater. His son from his third marriage to Lady Susanna Stewart, Lord Granville Leveson-Gore, was created Earl Granville in 1833, a revival of the title created for his great-great-aunt in 1715.

    The Emigrants Statue commemorates the flight of Highlanders during the clearances, but is also a testament to their accomplishments in the places they settled. Located at the foot of the Highland Mountains in Helmsdale, Scotland.Lord Stafford was succeeded by his eldest son from his second marriage, George. He married Elizabeth Sutherland, 19th Countess of Sutherland. In 1803 he succeeded to the vast estates of his maternal uncle Francis Egerton, 3rd Duke of Bridgewater. In 1833 he was created Duke of Sutherland in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.

    [edit] ClearancesThe 1st Duke and Duchess of Sutherland remain controversial for their role in the Highland Clearances, when thousands of crofters were removed forcibly from their land so as to allow sheep rearing on a much larger scale than before. Such activities were in widespread use across Scotland and Ireland in the 18th and 19th centuries. The Clearances were considered by the landlords as necessary “improvements”. They are thought to have been begun by Admiral John Ross of Balnagowan Castle in 1762. MacLeod of MacLeod (i.e. the chief of MacLeod) began experimental work on Skye in 1732. Chiefs engaged Lowland, or sometimes English, factors with expertise in more profitable sheep farming, and they “encouraged”, sometimes forcibly, the population to move off suitable land. Another wave of mass emigration came in 1792, known as the “Year of the Sheep” to Scottish Highlanders. The people were accommodated in poor crofts or small farms in coastal areas where farming could not sustain the communities and they were expected to take up fishing. In the village of Badbea in Caithness the conditions were so harsh that, while the women worked, they had to tether their livestock and even their children to rocks or posts to prevent them being blown over the cliffs.[2] Others were put directly onto emigration ships to Nova Scotia (Antigonish and Pictou counties and later Cape Breton), the Kingston area of Ontario and the Carolinas of the American colonies. There may have been a religious element in these forced removals since many Highlanders were Roman Catholic. This is reflected by the majority representation of Catholics in areas and towns of Nova Scotia such as Antigonish and Cape Breton. However almost all of the very large movement of Highland settlers to the Cape Fear region of North Carolina were Presbyterian. (This is evidenced even today in the presence and extent of Presbyterian congregations and adherents in the region.)

    [edit] EstatesAccording to the will of the Duke of Bridgewater, the Egerton estates passed on the death of the first Duke of Sutherland to his third son Lord Francis Leveson-Gower, who changed his surname to Egerton by Royal license. In 1846 he was created Viscount Brackley and Earl of Ellesmere.

    The Duke was succeeded by his eldest son and namesake George, the second Duke. In 1839 he also succeeded his mother in the ancient Scottish titles of Earl of Sutherland and Lord Strathnaver. His eldest son, the third Duke, married Anne Hay-Mackenzie, who in 1864 was created Countess of Cromarty, with remainder to their younger sons (see Earl of Cromarty).

    His grandson, the fifth Duke, succeeded to the title at the age of 25 in 1913. In 1914 he decided on the outbreak of the First World War that it was unwise to have so much of his riches tied up in land and property. He sold the family’s Staffordshire estate except Lilleshall Hall and 50 acres (20 ha) of gardens. He then decided he wanted to live closer to London, and sold the whole package in 1917 to Sir John Lee. The Duke was childless; on his death in 1963, the line of the eldest son of the first Duke failed. He was succeeded in the earldom of Sutherland and lordship of Strathnaver, which could be inherited by females, by his niece Elizabeth. Elizabeth also inherited most of her uncle’s wealth, but the dukedom and other titles could only be passed on to male heirs, and they were inherited by his third cousin once removed, John Sutherland Egerton, 5th Earl of Ellesmere, who became the 6th Duke of Sutherland as well. He was a great-great-grandson of the first Earl of Ellesmere, third son of the first Duke of Sutherland. He also died childless and was succeeded by his first cousin once removed, Francis Ronald Egerton, the seventh and present duke, a grandson of the Hon. Francis William George Egerton, second son of the third Earl of Ellesmere.

    Today most of the duke’s wealth is in the form of the art collection put together by the first duke’s uncle, Francis Egerton, 3rd Duke of Bridgewater, which had been inherited by the Ellesmere line of the family.

    [edit] Other family membersWilliam Gower, youngest son of Sir William the fourth Baronet, was Member of Parliament for Ludlow.

    The Hon. William Leveson-Gower, second son of John, first Baron Gower and grandson of the fourth Baronet, was Member of Parliament for Stafford. The Hon. Thomas Leveson-Gower, third son of the first Baron, was Member of Parliament for Newcastle-under-Lyme. The Hon. Baptist Leveson-Gower, fourth son of the first Baron, was also Member of Parliament for Newcastle-under-Lyme.

    The Hon. Richard Leveson-Gower, fourth son of the first Earl, was Member of Parliament for Lichfield. The Hon. John Leveson-Gower (1740–1792), sixth son of the first Earl, was an Admiral in the Royal Navy.

    Frederick Neville Sutherland Leveson-Gower, son of Lord Albert Leveson-Gower, younger son of the second Duke, sat as Member of Parliament for Sutherland. Lord Ronald Gower, youngest son of the second Duke, was a politician, sculptor and writer.

    [edit] SeatsThe family seat was originally Lilleshall Hall and later, grander, family seats included Trentham Hall, Dunrobin Castle, and Cliveden. In the 19th and early 20th century the family’s London residence was Stafford House, which was rated as the most valuable private residence in London.

    The duke’s current seat is at Mertoun House in St. Boswells, in the Scottish Borders.

    [edit] Gower, later Leveson-Gower Baronets, of Stittenham (1620)Sir Thomas Gower, 1st Baronet (1584–c. 1665) was descended in the direct male line from a number of knights
    Sir Thomas Gower, 2nd Baronet (c. 1605–1672), son of the 1st Baronet
    Edward Gower, an elder son of the 2nd Baronet, presumably predeceased his father
    Sir Thomas Gower, 3rd Baronet (c. 1666–1689), a son of Edward, died unmarried
    Sir William Leveson-Gower, 4th Baronet (c. 1647–1691), a younger son of the 2nd Baronet
    Sir John Leveson-Gower, 5th Baronet (1675–1709) (created Baron Gower in 1703)
    [edit] Barons Gower (1703)John Leveson-Gower, 1st Baron Gower (1675–1709), eldest son of the 4th Baronet
    John Leveson-Gower, 2nd Baron Gower (1694–1754) (created Earl Gower in 1746)
    [edit] Earls Gower (1746)Other titles: Viscount Trentham, of Trentham in the county of Stafford (1746) and Baron Gower (1703)
    John Leveson-Gower, 1st Earl Gower (1694–1754), eldest son of the 1st Baron
    Granville Leveson-Gower, 2nd Earl Gower (1721–1803) (created Marquess of Stafford in 1786)
    [edit] Marquesses of Stafford (1786)Other titles: Earl Gower and Viscount Trentham, of Trentham in the county of Stafford (1746) and Baron Gower (1703)
    Granville Leveson-Gower, 1st Marquess of Stafford (1721–1803), third (eldest surviving) son of the 1st Earl
    George Leveson-Gower, 2nd Marquess of Stafford (1758–1833) (created Duke of Sutherland in 1833)
    [edit] Dukes of Sutherland (1833)Other titles (1st Duke onwards): Marquess of Stafford (1786), Earl Gower and Viscount Trentham, of Trentham in the county of Stafford (1746) and Baron Gower (1703)
    George Leveson-Gower, 1st Duke of Sutherland (1758–1833), eldest son of the 1st Marquess
    Other titles (2nd–5th Dukes): Earl of Sutherland and Lord Strathnaver (Sc 1235)
    George Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, 2nd Duke of Sutherland (1786–1861), eldest son of the 1st Duke
    George Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, 3rd Duke of Sutherland (1828–1892), eldest son of the 2nd Duke
    George Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, Earl Gower (1850–1858), eldest son of the 3rd Duke (then Lord Stafford), died in childhood
    Cromartie Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, 4th Duke of Sutherland (1851–1913), second son of the 3rd Duke
    George Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, 5th Duke of Sutherland (1888–1963), eldest son of the 4th Duke, died without issue
    Other titles (6th Duke onwards): Earl of Ellesmere and Viscount Brackley, of Brackley in the county of Northamptonshire (1846)
    John Egerton, 6th Duke of Sutherland (1915–2000), already 5th Earl of Ellesmere, great-great-grandson of Francis Egerton, 1st Earl of Ellesmere (previously Lord Francis Leveson-Gower), third son of the 1st Duke, died without issue
    Francis Egerton, 7th Duke of Sutherland (b. 1940), first cousin once removed of the 6th Duke and great-grandson of Francis Charles Granville Egerton, 3rd Earl of Ellesmere
    Heir apparent: James Egerton, Marquess of Stafford (b. 1975), eldest son of the 7th Duke, has three daughters
    [edit] See alsoCountess of Sutherland
    Duke of Bridgewater
    Earl Granville
    Earl of Bath (1661 creation)
    Earl of Cromartie
    Earl of Ellesmere
    Highland Clearances
    Sutherland
    [edit] References^ George Edward Cockayne Complete Baronetage Volume 1 1900
    ^ Campbell, James (1984). Invisible Country: A Journey through Scotland. Weidenfeld and Nicolson. p. 81. ISBN 0-297-78371-8.
    Leigh Rayment’s Peerage Pages [self-published source][better source needed]
    An Online Gotha – Sutherland
    Cracroft’s Peerage
    thePeerage.com

    • Renee says:

      ***NOTE***

      EstatesAccording to the will of the Duke of Bridgewater, the Egerton estates passed on the death of the first Duke of Sutherland to his third son Lord Francis Leveson-Gower, who changed his surname to Egerton by Royal license. In 1846 he was created Viscount Brackley and Earl of Ellesmere.

      The Duke was succeeded by his eldest son and namesake George, the second Duke. In 1839 he also succeeded his mother in the ancient Scottish titles of Earl of Sutherland and Lord Strathnaver. His eldest son, the third Duke, married Anne Hay-Mackenzie, who in 1864 was created Countess of Cromarty, with remainder to their younger sons (see Earl of Cromarty).

      His grandson, the fifth Duke, succeeded to the title at the age of 25 in 1913. In 1914 he decided on the outbreak of the First World War that it was unwise to have so much of his riches tied up in land and property. He sold the family’s Staffordshire estate except Lilleshall Hall and 50 acres (20 ha) of gardens. He then decided he wanted to live closer to London, and sold the whole package in 1917 to Sir John Lee. The Duke was childless; on his death in 1963, the line of the eldest son of the first Duke failed. He was succeeded in the earldom of Sutherland and lordship of Strathnaver, which could be inherited by females, by his niece Elizabeth. Elizabeth also inherited most of her uncle’s wealth, but the dukedom and other titles could only be passed on to male heirs, and they were inherited by his third cousin once removed, John Sutherland Egerton, 5th Earl of Ellesmere, who became the 6th Duke of Sutherland as well. He was a great-great-grandson of the first Earl of Ellesmere, third son of the first Duke of Sutherland. He also died childless and was succeeded by his first cousin once removed, Francis Ronald Egerton, the seventh and present duke, a grandson of the Hon. Francis William George Egerton, second son of the third Earl of Ellesmere.

      *** Anne Hay-Mackenzie***

      • Renee says:

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_Sutherland-Leveson-Gower,_Duchess_of_Sutherland
        Anne Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, Duchess of Sutherland VA (21 April 1829 – 25 November 1888), 1st Countess of Cromartie in her own right and known as the Marchioness of Stafford from 1849 to 1861, was a British peeress.

        Born Anne Hay-Mackenzie, she was the daughter of John Hay-Mackenzie of Newhall and Cromarty and the great-great-granddaughter of George Mackenzie, 3rd Earl of Cromartie (who took part in the Jacobite rising of 1745 and was attainted in 1746).

        On 27 June 1849 she married George Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, Marquess of Stafford, eldest son of George Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, 2nd Duke of Sutherland. He succeeded as third Duke of Sutherland on 22 February 1861. The Duchess of Sutherland had succeeded to her father’s lands in the year of her marriage. On 21 October 1861 the title held by her great-great-grandfather was revived when she was created Countess of Cromartie in her own right, with remainder to her younger sons and her daughters. She later served as Mistress of the Robes to Queen Victoria from 1870 to 1874, and was awarded the Order of Victoria and Albert (3rd class).[1]

        On her death in 1888, aged 59, she was succeeded in her earldom according to the special remainder by her younger son Lord Francis Leveson-Gower. The Duke of Sutherland died in 1892 and was succeeded by their eldest surviving son Cromartie.

        She died at the family’s London mansion, Stafford House, St James’ Park, and was buried at Babbacombe Cemetery, Torquay, Devon.[1]

        [edit] Titles and styles21 April 1829 – 27 June 1849: Miss Anne Hay-Mackenzie
        27 June 1849 – 21 October 1861: Marchioness of Stafford
        21 October 1861 – 25 November 1888: Her Grace The Duchess of Sutherland

      • Renee says:

        Sir John Lee ?

        http://www.house-empire.com/personpage.lasso?token.cardid=4055
        Richard was the sixth of eight sons of Sir John Lee (1530-1605), of “Coton Hall”, Nordley Regis, Shropshire, England, and his wife, Joyce Romney (1528-1609). John and Joyce were married June 24, 1553. John’s will was dated May 7, 1605 and proved May 14 of the same year. He was buried June 13, 1605 at Chesham, Buckingham Co., England. Joyce was buried at Alveley on December 4, 1609. Besides “Coton Hall”, which was the manor house, there were several other farms included in the Nordley Regis lands, including “The Hay” which was the dower house, “Nordley Farm”, about a mile northeast of “Coton Hall”, and several others. It has been debated that the emigrant was a son of another of Sir John Lee’s eight sons. However, all of the other seven sons other than the oldest, Thomas Lee (d. 1621) who was the heir of “Coton Hall”, died without issue. Joyce was the daughter of John Romney, of “Hulsley”, Worcester Co., England.

        Sir John Lee IV
        c. 1372 – 1424

        John Lee V
        c. 1420 – 1478

        Jacosa Packington
        c. 1374 –

        Sir Thomas Lee II, Esq.
        c.. 1465 – March 16, 1526

        Elizabeth Corbin
        c. 1458 –

        Sir Humphrey Lee
        1505 – c. Mar. 12, 1588

        Sir Thomas Morton
        1458 –

        Johanna Morton
        c. 1482 – c. 1526

        Sir John Lee
        1530 – 1605

        Sir John Blount
        c.. 1385 – 1442

        Sir Humphrey Blount
        1422 – Oct. 12, 1477

        Alice de la Barre
        c. 1400 – Oct. 28, 1445

        John Blount
        c. 1452 –

        Katherine Blount
        c. 1506 – Aug. 1591

        John Yee
        c. 1440 –

        Elizabeth Yee
        c. 1467 –

  21. Renee says:

    http://thepeerage.com/p5561.htm
    Sarah Arabella Marjorie von Hofmannsthal1
    F, #55604, b. 14 January 1942

    Sarah Arabella Marjorie von Hofmannsthal|b. 14 Jan 1942|p5561.htm#i55604|Raimund von Hofmannsthal|d. 20 Mar 1974|p5669.htm#i56685|Lady Elizabeth Hester Mary Paget|b. 28 Oct 1916\nd. 1980|p5561.htm#i55601|Hugo von Hofmannsthal|d. b 1963|p5264.htm#i52634||||Charles H. A. Paget, 6th Marquess of Anglesey|b. 14 Apr 1885\nd. 21 Feb 1947|p1600.htm#i15997|Lady Victoria M. H. Manners|b. 20 Dec 1883\nd. 3 Nov 1946|p1600.htm#i15996|

    Last Edited=18 Feb 2012
    Sarah Arabella Marjorie von Hofmannsthal was born on 14 January 1942.1 She is the daughter of Raimund von Hofmannsthal and Lady Elizabeth Hester Mary Paget.1 She married, firstly, Frederick Patrick Piers Baron von Westenholz, son of Henry Frederick Everhard Baron von Westenholz, on 17 June 1964.1 She and Frederick Patrick Piers Baron von Westenholz were divorced in 1969.1 She married, secondly, Michael FitzGerald Heathcoat-Amory, son of Major Edgar Fitzgerald Heathcoat-Amory and Sonia Myrtle Denison, in 1975.2
    Sarah Arabella Marjorie von Hofmannsthal usually went by her middle name of Arabella.1 From 17 June 1964, her married name became von Westenholz.1 From 1975, her married name became Heathcoat-Amory.2
    Children of Sarah Arabella Marjorie von Hofmannsthal and Michael FitzGerald Heathcoat-Amory
    Lucy Sonia Elizabeth Heathcoat-Amory+2 b. 1977
    Jessica Diana Mary Heathcoat-Amory3 b. 1979
    Citations
    [S8] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volume 1, page 78. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1854. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition, volume 2, page 1853.
    Lt.-Col. Jocelyn Eustace Gurney1
    M, #55605, b. 24 February 1910, d. 22 May 1973

    Lt.-Col. Jocelyn Eustace Gurney|b. 24 Feb 1910\nd. 22 May 1973|p5561.htm#i55605|Sir Eustace Gurney|b. 1 Dec 1876\nd. 3 Dec 1927|p5824.htm#i58240|Anne Agatha Lee-Warner|b. 1882\nd. 1966|p5561.htm#i55606|John Gurney|b. 11 Dec 1845\nd. 24 Feb 1887|p5812.htm#i58111|Isabel C. Blake-Humfrey|b. 1852\nd. 22 Feb 1932|p5812.htm#i58112|John Lee-Warner|d. 29 May 1917|p37908.htm#i379079|Blanche Hall-Dare|d. 21 Nov 1934|p44535.htm#i445347|

    Last Edited=4 Dec 2011
    Lt.-Col. Jocelyn Eustace Gurney was born on 24 February 1910 at Belgravia, London, England.2 He was the son of Sir Eustace Gurney and Anne Agatha Lee-Warner.1 He married, firstly, Lady Katharine Mary Veronica Paget, daughter of Charles Henry Alexander Paget, 6th Marquess of Anglesey and Lady Victoria Marjorie Harriet Manners, on 16 April 1941.1 He and Lady Katharine Mary Veronica Paget were divorced in 1948.1 He married, secondly, Susan Esterel Elwes, daughter of Captain Robert Hamond Arthur Elwes and Esterel Edith Philippa Louise Tillard, on 26 May 1949.3 He died on 22 May 1973 at age 63 at Depwade, Norfolk, England.1,2
    He was decorated with the award of Companion, Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.).1 He gained the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel in the service of the Welsh Guards.1 He held the office of Deputy Lieutenant (D.L.).1 He was decorated with the award of Military Cross (M.C.).1 He had three daughters by second wife.4
    Child of Lt.-Col. Jocelyn Eustace Gurney and Lady Katharine Mary Veronica Paget
    Judith Marjorie Katherine Gurney1 b. 1942
    Citations
    [S8] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volume 1, page 78. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition.
    [S4567] Bill Norton, “re: Pitman Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger LUNDY (101053), 6 April 2010 and 19 April 2011. Hereinafter cited as “re: Pitman Family.”
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 907. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S31] Bernard, Sir Burke, editor, Burke’s genealogical and heraldic history of the landed gentry of Ireland, 4th ed. (London, U.K.: Burkes Peerage Ltd, 1958), page 254. Hereinafter cited as Landed Gentry of Ireland.

    Anne Agatha Lee-Warner1
    F, #55606, b. 1882, d. 1966

    Anne Agatha Lee-Warner|b. 1882\nd. 1966|p5561.htm#i55606|John Lee-Warner|d. 29 May 1917|p37908.htm#i379079|Blanche Hall-Dare|d. 21 Nov 1934|p44535.htm#i445347|Reverend James Lee-Warner||p44535.htm#i445348||||Henry Hall-Dare|b. 8 Feb 1825\nd. Sep 1908|p37908.htm#i379077|Agatha Kekewich|d. 12 Feb 1878|p37909.htm#i379082|

    Last Edited=4 Dec 2011
    Anne Agatha Lee-Warner was born in 1882 at Norwich, Norfolk, England.2 She was the daughter of John Lee-Warner and Blanche Hall-Dare.1 She married Sir Eustace Gurney, son of John Gurney and Isabel Charlotte Blake-Humfrey, in 1905 at Norwich, Norfolk, England.2 She died in 1966 at Fakenham, Norfolk, England.2
    Her married name became Gurney.
    Children of Anne Agatha Lee-Warner and Sir Eustace Gurney
    Samuel Edmund Gurney+1 d. 1990
    John Gurney+ b. 3 Jul 1905, d. Feb 2000
    Catherine Gurney2 b. 1906
    Rosamund Agatha Gurney2 b. 20 Aug 1908, d. Feb 2000
    Lt.-Col. Jocelyn Eustace Gurney+ b. 24 Feb 1910, d. 22 May 1973
    Elizabeth Laura Gurney+2 b. 25 Jan 1914, d. 1994
    Citations
    [S5300] Chris Sexton, “re: Gurney Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger LUNDY (101053), 2 April 2011. Hereinafter cited as “re: Gurney Family.”
    [S4567] Bill Norton, “re: Pitman Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger LUNDY (101053), 6 April 2010 and 19 April 2011. Hereinafter cited as “re: Pitman Family.”
    Major Charles Farrell1
    M, #55607

    Major Charles Farrell||p5561.htm#i55607|Gerald William Farrell|d. b 1963|p5561.htm#i55608||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=18 Aug 2003
    Major Charles Farrell is the son of Gerald William Farrell.1 He married Lady Katharine Mary Veronica Paget, daughter of Charles Henry Alexander Paget, 6th Marquess of Anglesey and Lady Victoria Marjorie Harriet Manners, on 21 January 1949.1
    He gained the rank of Major in the service of the Scots Guards.1 He was in the Foreign Service.1 He was decorated with the award of Military Cross (M.C.).1
    Children of Major Charles Farrell and Lady Katharine Mary Veronica Paget
    Louisa Caroline Mary Farrell1 b. 1949
    Gerald Charles William Farrell+1 b. 1956
    Diana Mary Farrell1 b. 1958
    Marjorie Elizabeth Mary Farrell1 b. 1962
    Citations
    [S8] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volume 1, page 78. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition.
    Gerald William Farrell1
    M, #55608, d. before 1963

    Last Edited=18 Aug 2003
    Gerald William Farrell died before 1963.
    Child of Gerald William Farrell
    Major Charles Farrell+1
    Citations
    [S8] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volume 1, page 78. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition.
    Elizabeth Shirley Vaughan Morgan1
    F, #55609

    Elizabeth Shirley Vaughan Morgan||p5561.htm#i55609|Charles Langbridge Morgan||p5561.htm#i55610|Hilda Vaughan||p5562.htm#i55611|Sir Charles L. Morgan||p5562.htm#i55612||||||||||

    Last Edited=27 Aug 2003
    Elizabeth Shirley Vaughan Morgan is the daughter of Charles Langbridge Morgan and Hilda Vaughan.1 She married George Charles Henry Victor Paget, 7th Marquess of Anglesey, son of Charles Henry Alexander Paget, 6th Marquess of Anglesey and Lady Victoria Marjorie Harriet Manners, on 16 October 1948.1
    Elizabeth Shirley Vaughan Morgan usually went by her middle name of Shirley.2 She gained the title of Marchioness of Anglesey on 16 October 1948. From 16 October 1948, her married name became Paget. She was invested as a Commander, Order of the British Empire (C.B.E.) in 1977.2 She was invested as a Dame Commander, Order of the British Empire (D.B.E.) in 1983.2
    Children of Elizabeth Shirley Vaughan Morgan and George Charles Henry Victor Paget, 7th Marquess of Anglesey
    Lady Henrietta Charlotte Eiluned Paget+2 b. 31 Jul 1949
    Charles Alexander Vaughan Paget, Earl of Uxbridge+1 b. 13 Nov 1950
    Lady Elizabeth Sophia Rhiannon Paget+ b. 14 May 1954
    Lord Rupert Edward Llywellyn Paget+2 b. 21 Jul 1957
    Lady Amelia Myfanwy Polly Paget+2 b. 12 Sep 1963
    Citations
    [S2] Peter W. Hammond, editor, The Complete Peerage or a History of the House of Lords and All its Members From the Earliest Times, Volume XIV: Addenda & Corrigenda (Stroud, Gloucestershire, U.K.: Sutton Publishing, 1998), page 25. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage, Volume XIV.
    [S8] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volume 1, page 71. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition.
    Charles Langbridge Morgan1
    M, #55610

    Charles Langbridge Morgan||p5561.htm#i55610|Sir Charles Langbridge Morgan||p5562.htm#i55612||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=2 Jun 2009
    Charles Langbridge Morgan is the son of Sir Charles Langbridge Morgan.2 He married Hilda Vaughan.1
    He was an author.2 He lived at 16 Campden Hill Square, London, England.2 He graduated with a Doctor of Law (LL.D.).2 He graduated with a Master of Arts (M.A.).2
    Child of Charles Langbridge Morgan and Hilda Vaughan
    Elizabeth Shirley Vaughan Morgan+1
    Citations
    [S2] Peter W. Hammond, editor, The Complete Peerage or a History of the House of Lords and All its Members From the Earliest Times, Volume XIV: Addenda & Corrigenda (Stroud, Gloucestershire, U.K.: Sutton Publishing, 1998), page 25. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage, Volume XIV.
    [S8] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volume 1, page 71. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition.

    http://thepeerage.com/p37908.htm#i379079
    John Lee-Warner1
    M, #379079, d. 29 May 1917

    John Lee-Warner|d. 29 May 1917|p37908.htm#i379079|Reverend James Lee-Warner||p44535.htm#i445348||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=3 Apr 2011
    John Lee-Warner was the son of Reverend James Lee-Warner.1 He married Blanche Hall-Dare, daughter of Henry Hall-Dare and Agatha Kekewich, on 17 November 1880.1 He died on 29 May 1917.1
    He was in the Indian Civil Service.1
    Children of John Lee-Warner and Blanche Hall-Dare
    Lt.-Col. Harry Granville Lee-Warner2
    Anne Agatha Lee-Warner+ b. 1882, d. 1966
    Citations
    [S47] Hugh Montgomery-Massingberd, editor, Burke’s Irish Family Records (London, U.K.: Burkes Peerage Ltd, 1976), page 328. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Irish Family Records.
    [S47] Hugh Montgomery-Massingberd, Burke’s Irish Family Records, page 329.
    Daniel Tupper1
    M, #379080, b. 1801

    Last Edited=16 Jun 2012
    Daniel Tupper was born in 1801 at St. Peter Port, Guernsey, Channel Islands.2 He married Anna M. (?).2
    He lived at Melrose, Guernsey, Channel Islands.1
    Children of Daniel Tupper and Anna M. (?)
    Alice Mary Tupper3 d. May 1915
    Gaspard Le M. Tupper4 b. 1827
    Helen A. Tupper4 b. 1830
    Francis Gerard St. George Tupper2 b. c 1845, d. 1924
    Citations
    [S47] Hugh Montgomery-Massingberd, editor, Burke’s Irish Family Records (London, U.K.: Burkes Peerage Ltd, 1976), page 328. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Irish Family Records.
    [S988] Cornwall OPC Database, online http://www.cornwall-opc-database.org/. Hereinafter cited as Cornwall OPC Database.
    [S47] Hugh Montgomery-Massingberd, Burke’s Irish Family Records.
    [S4567] Bill Norton, “re: Pitman Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger LUNDY (101053), 6 April 2010 and 19 April 2011. Hereinafter cited as “re: Pitman Family.”

  22. Renee says:

    http://www.thepeerage.com/p925.htm
    HOWARD*

    Walter Stewart1
    M, #108031

    Walter Stewart||p10804.htm#i108031|Alexander Stewart, 1st Earl of Buchan|b. c 1343\nd. 24 Jul 1394|p10211.htm#i102102|Margaret Atheyn||p10803.htm#i108027|Robert I. Stewart, King of Scotland|b. 2 Mar 1315/16\nd. 19 Apr 1390|p10210.htm#i102097|Elizabeth Mure of Rowallan|d. b 1355|p10210.htm#i102098|||||||

    Last Edited=10 Jan 2009
    Walter Stewart was the son of Alexander Stewart, 1st Earl of Buchan and Margaret Atheyn.1
    Citations
    [S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 221. Hereinafter cited as Britain’s Royal Family.
    James Stewart
    M, #108032

    James Stewart||p10804.htm#i108032|Alexander Stewart, 1st Earl of Buchan|b. c 1343\nd. 24 Jul 1394|p10211.htm#i102102|Margaret Atheyn||p10803.htm#i108027|Robert I. Stewart, King of Scotland|b. 2 Mar 1315/16\nd. 19 Apr 1390|p10210.htm#i102097|Elizabeth Mure of Rowallan|d. b 1355|p10210.htm#i102098|||||||

    Last Edited=4 Oct 2012
    James Stewart was the son of Alexander Stewart, 1st Earl of Buchan and Margaret Atheyn.1
    He lived at Fothergill.
    Child of James Stewart
    unknown daughter Stewart+2
    Citations
    [S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 221. Hereinafter cited as Britain’s Royal Family.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003). Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Robert of Atholl1
    M, #108033

    Robert of Atholl||p10804.htm#i108033|Alexander Stewart, 1st Earl of Buchan|b. c 1343\nd. 24 Jul 1394|p10211.htm#i102102|Margaret Atheyn||p10803.htm#i108027|Robert I. Stewart, King of Scotland|b. 2 Mar 1315/16\nd. 19 Apr 1390|p10210.htm#i102097|Elizabeth Mure of Rowallan|d. b 1355|p10210.htm#i102098|||||||

    Last Edited=10 May 2003
    Robert of Atholl is the son of Alexander Stewart, 1st Earl of Buchan and Margaret Atheyn.1
    Citations
    [S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 221. Hereinafter cited as Britain’s Royal Family.
    Margaret Stewart
    F, #108034

    Margaret Stewart||p10804.htm#i108034|Alexander Stewart, 1st Earl of Buchan|b. c 1343\nd. 24 Jul 1394|p10211.htm#i102102|Margaret Atheyn||p10803.htm#i108027|Robert I. Stewart, King of Scotland|b. 2 Mar 1315/16\nd. 19 Apr 1390|p10210.htm#i102097|Elizabeth Mure of Rowallan|d. b 1355|p10210.htm#i102098|||||||

    Last Edited=23 May 2008
    Margaret Stewart was the daughter of Alexander Stewart, 1st Earl of Buchan and Margaret Atheyn.1 She married Robert de Moravia, 6th Earl of Sutherland, son of William de Moravia, 5th Earl of Sutherland and Joan Menteith, circa November 1389.
    Her married name became de Moravia.
    Child of Margaret Stewart and Robert de Moravia, 6th Earl of Sutherland
    John de Moravia, 7th Earl of Sutherland+ b. b 1408, d. a 1460
    Citations
    [S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 221. Hereinafter cited as Britain’s Royal Family.
    Robert de Moravia, 6th Earl of Sutherland
    M, #108035, d. 1427

    Robert de Moravia, 6th Earl of Sutherland|d. 1427|p10804.htm#i108035|William de Moravia, 5th Earl of Sutherland|d. bt 27 Feb 1370 – 19 Jun 1371|p10791.htm#i107906|Joan Menteith|d. a 1367|p10787.htm#i107868|Kenneth de Moravia, 4th Earl of Sutherland|d. Jul 1333|p2587.htm#i25864|Margaret of Mar||p10786.htm#i107857|Sir John Menteith||p10787.htm#i107869||||

    Last Edited=10 May 2003
    Robert de Moravia, 6th Earl of Sutherland was the son of William de Moravia, 5th Earl of Sutherland and Joan Menteith. He married Margaret Stewart, daughter of Alexander Stewart, 1st Earl of Buchan and Margaret Atheyn, circa November 1389. He died in 1427.1
    He was also known as Robert Sutherland.1 He gained the title of 6th Earl of Sutherland.1
    Child of Robert de Moravia, 6th Earl of Sutherland and Margaret Stewart
    John de Moravia, 7th Earl of Sutherland+ b. b 1408, d. a 1460
    Citations
    [S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 221. Hereinafter cited as Britain’s Royal Family.

    Eupheme de Ross, Countess of Ross1
    F, #108036, b. between 1342 and 1345, d. between 5 September 1394 and 20 February 1395

    Eupheme de Ross, Countess of Ross|b. bt 1342 – 1345\nd. bt 5 Sep 1394 – 20 Feb 1395|p10804.htm#i108036|William de Ross, 5th Earl of Ross|d. 9 Feb 1371/72|p10790.htm#i107900|Mary Macdonald||p10791.htm#i107901|Aodh de Ross, 4th Earl of Ross|d. 19 Jul 1333|p10790.htm#i107897|Matilda Bruce|d. bt 1323 – 1329|p10790.htm#i107896|Angus ‘Oig’ Macdonald, Lord of the Isles|b. b 1296\nd. 1330|p10791.htm#i107902|Agnes O’Cathan||p14700.htm#i146996|

    Last Edited=14 Oct 2012
    Consanguinity Index=0.39%
    Eupheme de Ross, Countess of Ross was born between 1342 and 1345.1 She was the daughter of William de Ross, 5th Earl of Ross and Mary Macdonald.1 She married, firstly, Walter Leslie, Earl of Ross, son of Andrew de Leslie of Leslie and Maria Abernethy, between 1357 and 13 September 1366.1 She married Walter Leslie, Earl of Ross, son of Andrew de Leslie of Leslie and Maria Abernethy, on 24 November 1366.2 She married, secondly, Alexander Stewart, 1st Earl of Buchan, son of Robert II Stewart, King of Scotland and Elizabeth Mure of Rowallan, circa 24 July 1382.1 She died between 5 September 1394 and 20 February 1395.1 She was buried at Fortrose Cathedral, Fortrose, Ross-shire, Scotland.1
    She was styled as Lady of Ross on 9 February 1372.1 She succeeded to the title of 8th Countess of Ross before 24 July 1382, suo jure.1 On 24 July 1382 married 2nd c (divorce 1392) Alexander Stewart ‘Wolf of Badenoch’ (see MORAY, E).2 Her married name became Stewart.
    Children of Eupheme de Ross, Countess of Ross and Walter Leslie, Earl of Ross
    Alexander Leslie, 7th Earl of Ross+1 d. 8 May 1402
    Mary Leslie, Countess of Ross+1 d. c 1435
    Citations
    [S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 221. Hereinafter cited as Britain’s Royal Family.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 3, page 3402. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Walter Leslie, Earl of Ross1
    M, #108037, d. 27 February 1381/82

    Walter Leslie, Earl of Ross|d. 27 Feb 1381/82|p10804.htm#i108037|Andrew de Leslie of Leslie|d. b 1324|p23118.htm#i231178|Maria Abernethy||p2116.htm#i21153|||||||Sir Alexander Abernethy of that Ilk||p2116.htm#i21154||||

    Last Edited=14 Oct 2012
    Walter Leslie, Earl of Ross was the son of Andrew de Leslie of Leslie and Maria Abernethy.2 He married Eupheme de Ross, Countess of Ross, daughter of William de Ross, 5th Earl of Ross and Mary Macdonald, between 1357 and 13 September 1366.1 He married Eupheme de Ross, Countess of Ross, daughter of William de Ross, 5th Earl of Ross and Mary Macdonald, on 24 November 1366.3 He died on 27 February 1381/82.4
    He gained the title of Earl of Ross, jure uxoris.1
    Children of Walter Leslie, Earl of Ross and Eupheme de Ross, Countess of Ross
    Alexander Leslie, 7th Earl of Ross+1 d. 8 May 1402
    Mary Leslie, Countess of Ross+1 d. c 1435
    Citations
    [S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 221. Hereinafter cited as Britain’s Royal Family.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 3413. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition, volume 3, page 3402.
    [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume II, page 376. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
    Mary Leslie, Countess of Ross1
    F, #108038, d. circa 1435

    Mary Leslie, Countess of Ross|d. c 1435|p10804.htm#i108038|Walter Leslie, Earl of Ross|d. 27 Feb 1381/82|p10804.htm#i108037|Eupheme de Ross, Countess of Ross|b. bt 1342 – 1345\nd. bt 5 Sep 1394 – 20 Feb 1395|p10804.htm#i108036|Andrew de Leslie of Leslie|d. b 1324|p23118.htm#i231178|Maria Abernethy||p2116.htm#i21153|William de Ross, 5th Earl of Ross|d. 9 Feb 1371/72|p10790.htm#i107900|Mary Macdonald||p10791.htm#i107901|

    Last Edited=15 Oct 2012
    Mary Leslie, Countess of Ross was the daughter of Walter Leslie, Earl of Ross and Eupheme de Ross, Countess of Ross.1 She married Donald Macdonald, Lord of the Isles, son of Iain Macdonald, Lord of the Isles and Margaret Stewart.1 She died circa 1435.1
    She was also known as Margaret.2 She gained the title of Countess of Ross.1
    Children of Mary Leslie, Countess of Ross and Donald Macdonald, Lord of the Isles
    Alexander Macdonald, 10th Earl of Ross+3 d. 7 May 1449
    Angus Macdonald3
    unknown son Macdonald3
    Anna Macdonald3
    Citations
    [S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 221. Hereinafter cited as Britain’s Royal Family.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 3, page 3402. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition, volume 1, page 450.
    Donald Macdonald, Lord of the Isles1
    M, #108039, d. 1423

    Donald Macdonald, Lord of the Isles|d. 1423|p10804.htm#i108039|Iain Macdonald, Lord of the Isles|b. c 1326\nd. 1387|p10807.htm#i108062|Margaret Stewart|b. bt 1348 – 1350|p10531.htm#i105309|Angus ‘Oig’ Macdonald, Lord of the Isles|b. b 1296\nd. 1330|p10791.htm#i107902|Agnes O’Cathan||p14700.htm#i146996|Robert I. Stewart, King of Scotland|b. 2 Mar 1315/16\nd. 19 Apr 1390|p10210.htm#i102097|Elizabeth Mure of Rowallan|d. b 1355|p10210.htm#i102098|

    Last Edited=15 Oct 2012
    Consanguinity Index=0.32%
    Donald Macdonald, Lord of the Isles was the son of Iain Macdonald, Lord of the Isles and Margaret Stewart.2 He married Mary Leslie, Countess of Ross, daughter of Walter Leslie, Earl of Ross and Eupheme de Ross, Countess of Ross.1 He died in 1423.1
    Lord of the Isles.3 He was styled as 9th Earl of Ross.4 He fought in the Battle of Harlaw on 24 July 1411, where his invasion of the Scottish mainland was checked by the Regent of Scotland.4
    Children of Donald Macdonald, Lord of the Isles and Mary Leslie, Countess of Ross
    Alexander Macdonald, 10th Earl of Ross+4 d. 7 May 1449
    Angus Macdonald4
    unknown son Macdonald4
    Anna Macdonald4
    Citations
    [S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 221. Hereinafter cited as Britain’s Royal Family.
    [S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Family, page 222.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 3, page 3402. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition, volume 1, page 450.
    Sir Thomas de la Haye, 7th of Erroll1
    M, #108040, d. July 1406

    Sir Thomas de la Haye, 7th of Erroll|d. Jul 1406|p10804.htm#i108040|Sir David de la Haye, 6th of Erroll|d. 17 Oct 1346|p27849.htm#i278490|unknown daughter Keith||p27850.htm#i278491|Nicholas de la Haye, younger of Erroll|d. 1332|p27849.htm#i278489||||Sir John Keith of Innerpeffer||p19015.htm#i190148||||

    Last Edited=23 Nov 2010
    Sir Thomas de la Haye, 7th of Erroll was the son of Sir David de la Haye, 6th of Erroll and unknown daughter Keith.2 He married Elizabeth Stewart, daughter of Robert II Stewart, King of Scotland and Elizabeth Mure of Rowallan, circa 7 November 1372.1 He died in July 1406.1
    In 1354 he was a hostage in England for King David II’s ransom.1 He held the office of Constable of Scotland.
    Children of Sir Thomas de la Haye, 7th of Erroll and Elizabeth Stewart
    Sir William de la Haye, 1st Lord Hay+3 d. 1437
    Sir Gilbert Hay of Dronlaw+4
    Elizabeth de la Haye+4
    Alice de la Haye+4
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1335. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 221. Hereinafter cited as Britain’s Royal Family.
    [S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Family, page 222.

  23. Renee says:

    http://www.thepeerage.com/p35559.htm
    Joanna Ethne Julia Poett1
    F, #355581

    Joanna Ethne Julia Poett||p35559.htm#i355581|General Sir Joseph Howard Nigel Poett||p35562.htm#i355617||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=7 May 2009
    Joanna Ethne Julia Poett is the daughter of General Sir Joseph Howard Nigel Poett.1 She married Peter Geoffrey Edmund Nathaniel Sebag-Montefiore, son of Major Geoffrey Edmund Sebag-Montefiore and Elizabeth Grace Troyte-Bullock, on 17 September 1960.1
    From 17 September 1960, her married name became Sebag-Montefiore.1
    Children of Joanna Ethne Julia Poett and Peter Geoffrey Edmund Nathaniel Sebag-Montefiore
    Geoffrey Edward Sebag-Montefiore1 b. 23 Jun 1961
    Louise Elizabeth Julia Sebag-Montefiore+1 b. 31 Jul 1962
    Edward Peter Nigel Sebag-Montefiore1 b. 28 Sep 1963
    Citations
    [S35] Peter Townend, editor, Burke’s Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry, 18th edition, 3 volumes (London, England: Burke’s Peerage Ltd, 1965-1972), volume 1, page 506. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Landed Gentry, 18th ed.
    Sir Richard Douglas Denman, 1st Bt.1
    M, #355582, b. 24 August 1876, d. 22 December 1957

    Sir Richard Douglas Denman, 1st Bt.|b. 24 Aug 1876\nd. 22 Dec 1957|p35559.htm#i355582|Hon. Richard Denman|b. 3 Jan 1842\nd. 5 Apr 1883|p2357.htm#i23562|Helen Mary McMicking||p2951.htm#i29502|Hon. Richard Denman|b. 13 Jan 1814\nd. 19 Mar 1887|p316.htm#i3159|Emma Jones|d. 2 Jan 1904|p316.htm#i3160|Gilbert McMicking||p4560.htm#i45599||||

    Last Edited=6 Mar 2011
    Sir Richard Douglas Denman, 1st Bt. was born on 24 August 1876.1 He was the son of Hon. Richard Denman and Helen Mary McMicking.2 He married, firstly, Helen Christian Sutherland, daughter of Sir Thomas Sutherland, on 11 February 1904.1 He married, secondly, Mary Radley Spencer, daughter of James Spencer, on 10 June 1914.3 He died on 22 December 1957 at age 81.1
    He was educated at Westminster School, Westminster, London, England.3 He graduated from Balliol College, Oxford University, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England, with a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.).3 He was Private Secretary to the Postmaster-General between 1906 and 1910.3 He held the office of Justice of the Peace (J.P.) for Cumberland.1 He held the office of Parliamentary Private Secretary in 1910, to the President of the Board of Trade.3 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Carlisle between 1910 and 1918.1 His marriage to Helen Christian Sutherland was annulled in 1913.3 He fought in the First World War.3 He gained the rank of Lieutenant in the service of the Royal Field Artillery.3 He held the office of President of the Board of Education in 1917.3 He held the office of President of the Board of Agriculture in 1917.3 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Leeds Central between 1929 and 1945.1 He held the office of Secretary of State, Air in 1931.3 He was chairman of the Marine and General Mutual Life Assurance Society between 1939 and 1944.3 He was created 1st Baronet Denman, of Dovedale, co. Derby [U.K.] on 2 July 1945.1
    Children of Sir Richard Douglas Denman, 1st Bt. and Mary Radley Spencer
    Charles Spencer Denman, 5th Baron Denman of Dovedale+2 b. 7 Jul 1916
    Phyllis Denman2 b. 13 Apr 1919
    Catherine Denman+2 b. 10 Jun 1920
    Harold Denman+2 b. 26 Jan 1922
    George Denman+2 b. 3 Jun 1925
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1092. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition, volume 1, page 1092.
    Sir Thomas Sutherland1
    M, #355583

    Last Edited=6 May 2009
    Child of Sir Thomas Sutherland
    Helen Christian Sutherland2
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1092. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Helen Christian Sutherland1
    F, #355584

    Helen Christian Sutherland||p35559.htm#i355584|Sir Thomas Sutherland||p35559.htm#i355583||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=8 May 2009
    Helen Christian Sutherland is the daughter of Sir Thomas Sutherland.2 She married Sir Richard Douglas Denman, 1st Bt., son of Hon. Richard Denman and Helen Mary McMicking, on 11 February 1904.1
    Only.1 She was Knight Grand Cross, Order of St. Michael and St. George (G.C.M.G.).1 Her married name became Denman. Her marriage to Sir Richard Douglas Denman, 1st Bt. was annulled in 1913.3 In 1913 annulled.1
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1092. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition, volume 1, page 1092.
    George Spence Davidson1
    M, #355585

    Last Edited=9 May 2009
    George Spence Davidson lived at Belgravia, London, England.1
    Child of George Spence Davidson
    Georgette Margaret Davidson+1 b. c 1915, d. 19 Sep 2010
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1832. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.

    Sophia Louise Leatham1
    F, #355586, b. 17 October 2006

    Sophia Louise Leatham|b. 17 Oct 2006|p35559.htm#i355586|Patrick Hawke Leatham|b. 1974|p35583.htm#i355823|Henrietta Louise Walder-Smith||p35583.htm#i355825|Philip W. Leatham||p35583.htm#i355822|Hon. Rowena M. Hawke|b. 23 Jun 1948|p35583.htm#i355821|Reginald V. Walder-Smith||p35583.htm#i355824||||

    Last Edited=9 May 2009
    Sophia Louise Leatham was born on 17 October 2006.1 She is the daughter of Patrick Hawke Leatham and Henrietta Louise Walder-Smith.1
    Citations
    [S1122] Peerage News, online http://peeragenews.blogspot.co.nz/. Hereinafter cited as Peerage News.
    unknown Hulton1
    M, #355587

    Last Edited=9 May 2009
    Children of unknown Hulton
    Alice Hulton+1
    Adam Hulton1
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Roland Sebastian Richard Denman1
    M, #355588, b. 1977

    Roland Sebastian Richard Denman|b. 1977|p35559.htm#i355588|Harold Denman|b. 26 Jan 1922|p32099.htm#i320981|Lady Frances Esmé Curzon|b. 8 Jun 1939|p5008.htm#i50071|Sir Richard D. Denman, 1st Bt.|b. 24 Aug 1876\nd. 22 Dec 1957|p35559.htm#i355582|Mary R. Spencer|d. 1 Apr 1974|p35552.htm#i355519|Francis R. H. P. Curzon, 5th Earl Howe|b. 1 May 1884\nd. 1 Sep 1964|p1066.htm#i10654|Joyce M. M. Jack||p5007.htm#i50069|

    Last Edited=8 May 2009
    Roland Sebastian Richard Denman was born in 1977.1 He is the son of Harold Denman and Lady Frances Esmé Curzon.2
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1092. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Adam Hulton1
    M, #355589

    Adam Hulton||p35559.htm#i355589|unknown Hulton||p35559.htm#i355587||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=9 May 2009
    Adam Hulton is the son of unknown Hulton.1
    He lived at Breightmet, England.1
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    David Fortune Landale1
    M, #355590

    Last Edited=8 May 2009
    David Fortune Landale lived at Dalswinton, Dumfries-shire, Scotland.1
    Child of David Fortune Landale
    Linda Louise Landale+2
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1092. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition

  24. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Sutherland_(banker)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HSBC_Group

    http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-18563_162-57558618/drug-cartels-bank-hsbc-to-see-no-arrests/
    CBS News) As bank slogans go, they don’t come worse than this: “The preferred financial institution of drug cartels and money launderers.”

    That’s a quote Tuesday in a U.S. Department of Justice report about HSBC Holdings, one of the largest banks in the world.

    To avoid criminal prosecution, HSBC admitted Tuesday that it laundered more than $800 million for Mexican drug cartels, and covered up illegal transactions for Burma, Iran, Sudan, Cuba, and Libya.

    Those nations were under banking sanctions because of human rights atrocities, terrorism, or — in Iran’s case — a nuclear program.

    The British bank will pay $1.9 billion to the U.S. government, the largest such fine in history.

    It’s a case that has everything — everything accept an arrest. That struck some as odd, because in 80 pages of court documents, the bank admits to almost going out of its way to act as a financial clearing house for international pariahs and drug dealers.

    Feds outline HSBC ties to laundering, drug money
    HSBC chief apologizes for lax controls
    HSBC legal costs rise by $1.1B, shares slump

    HSBC officials listed Mexico in its lowest risk category for money laundering during a four-year period when Mexican drug cartels were funneling over $700 billion through the bank.

    U.S. Attorney Loretta Lynch said: “The investigation revealed that staggering amounts of cash, hundreds of thousands of U.S. dollars daily, were being deposited into HSBC Mexico using boxes specially made to fit through tellers’ windows to speed the transactions.”

    It wasn’t just the cartels that benefited from what prosecutors called the HSBC’s “willful failure” to report suspicious activity. HSBC instructed an Iranian bank how to conceal $183 million in transactions. HSBC also admitted to cutting the number of internal watchdogs to save money.

    Assistant Attorney General Lanny Breuer said: “HSBC is paying a heavy price for its conduct, and under the terms of today’s agreement, if the bank fails to comply with the agreement in any way, any way at all, we reserve the right as the government to fully prosecute it.”

    Under the terms of Tuesday’s settlement, nobody at HSBC will face criminal charges.

    Notre Dame professor Jimmy Gurule, who investigated money-laundering cases for the Treasury Department, said: “We’re not talking about mere negligence. We’re talking about a criminal scheme that was adopted as a policy of HSBC that involved looking the other way in regard to suspicious transactions involving money laundering.”

    Some would say that the message is, if you break all the laws you can, until you get caught, you may have to pay a lot of money, but you’re not gonna go to jail.

    U.S Attorney Lynch, who is one of the architects of Tuesday’s settlement, disputed that idea, and said: “That’s a very short-sighted view, I think, because in this case they’re obviously paying a great deal of money, but they also have to literally had to turn their company inside out. And the message should be that that’s what you have to do.”

    In a statement from its London headquarters, HSBC said it has cleaned house, firing top executives and taking back their bonuses.

    Now, the bank has to demonstrate to a federal monitor that they are in compliance with all laws for five years.

    As for the lack of criminal prosecutions, the feds said that they never found one bank official, or any collection of bank officials acting together, that were doing this on purpose. They painted a picture of a disorganized bank that was collecting all these fees either not knowing, or not wanting to know where it all came from.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiefer_Sutherland

    • Renee says:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_Sutherland
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shirley_Douglas
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tommy_Douglas
      Thomas Clement “Tommy” Douglas, PC CC SOM (20 October 1904 – 24 February 1986) was a Scottish-born Canadian democratic socialist politician and Baptist minister. He was elected to the Canadian House of Commons in 1935 as a member of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) party. He left federal politics to become the Saskatchewan CCF’s leader and then the seventh Premier of Saskatchewan from 1944 to 1961. His government was the first democratic socialist government in North America, and it introduced the continent’s first single payer, universal health care program. After setting up Saskatchewan’s medicare program, he stepped down as premier and ran to lead the newly formed federal New Democratic Party, the National CCF’s successor party. Douglas was elected as its first federal leader in 1961. Although he never led the party to government, through much of his tenure, the party held the balance of power in the House. He was noted as being the main opposition to the imposition of the War Measures Act during the 1970 October Crisis. He resigned as leader the next year, but remained as a Member of Parliament until 1979. He was awarded many honorary degrees, and a foundation was named for him and his political mentor Major James Coldwell during 1971. In 1981, he was invested into the Order of Canada; and became a member of Canada’s Privy Council in 1984. He died in 1986 after a battle with cancer. In 2004, a CBC Television program named him “The Greatest Canadian,” based on a viewer-supported survey.

      Contents [hide]
      1 Early life
      2 Education
      2.1 Brandon College
      2.2 M.A. thesis on eugenics
      2.3 PhD research in Chicago
      3 From pulpit to politics
      4 Premier of Saskatchewan
      4.1 Medicare
      5 Federal NDP leader
      5.1 Becoming the New Party’s first leader
      5.2 House of Commons, Act II
      5.3 The War Measures Act, 1970
      6 Late career and retirement
      7 Tributes
      7.1 Artistic depiction
      8 Fables
      9 Honorary degrees
      10 References
      10.1 Notes
      10.2 Citations
      10.3 Bibliography
      11 External links

      [edit] Early lifeDouglas was born in Falkirk, Scotland, in 1904, the son of Annie (née Clement) and Thomas Douglas, an iron moulder who fought in the Boer War.[1] In 1910, his family emigrated to Canada, where they settled in Winnipeg.[2] Shortly before he left Scotland, Douglas fell and injured his right knee. Osteomyelitis set in and he underwent a number of operations in Scotland in an attempt to cure the condition. Later however, in Winnipeg, the osteomyelitis flared up again and Douglas was sent to hospital. Doctors there told his parents his leg would have to be amputated. Fortunately, a well-known orthopedic surgeon took an interest in his case and agreed to treat the boy for free if his parents would allow medical students to observe. After several operations, Douglas’s leg was saved. This experience convinced him that health care should be free to all. “I felt that no boy should have to depend either for his leg or his life upon the ability of his parents to raise enough money to bring a first-class surgeon to his bedside”, Douglas told an interviewer many years later.[3]

      During World War I, the family returned to Glasgow.[4] They came back to Winnipeg in late 1918, in time for Douglas to witness the Winnipeg General Strike.[5] From a rooftop vantage point on Main Street, he witnessed the police charging the strikers with clubs and guns, a streetcar being overturned and set on fire. He also witnessed the RCMP shoot and kill one of the workers. This incident influenced Douglas later in life by cementing his commitment to protect fundamental freedoms in a Bill of Rights when he was Premier of Saskatchewan.[6]

      At the age of fifteen, Douglas began an amateur career in boxing at the One Big Union (OBU) gym in Winnipeg.[7] Weighing 135 pounds, Douglas fought in 1922 for the Lightweight Championship of Manitoba; and after a six round fight won the title.[7] Douglas sustained a broken nose, a loss of some teeth, and a strained hand and thumb.[7] Douglas successfully held the title the following year.[7]

      In 1930 Douglas married Irma Dempsey, a music student at Brandon College. They had one daughter, actress Shirley Douglas, and they later adopted a second daughter Joan, who became a nurse. His grandson is the actor Kiefer Sutherland

  25. Renee says:

    http://www.inquisitr.com/392929/hsbc-scandal-british-bank-accused-of-helping-drug-running-and-arms-dealers/
    The HSBC scandal is just now unfolding as Britain’s largest institutional bank, HSBC, is being accused of a “drugs and gun-running” scandal. HSBC is accused of opening offshore accounts in New Jersey for high-profile British criminals including drug dealer Daniel Bayes and arms merchant Michael Lee. These Jersey-based HSBC bank accounts are purportedly being used for money laundering and British tax evasion.

    HSBC started as a small local bank in Hong Kong in 1865. Now HSBC is one of the world’s largest banking and financial services organisations. HSBC stock shares are listed on the London, Hong Kong, New York, Paris, and Bermuda stock exchanges.

    The HM (Her Majesty’s) Revenue and Customs began investigation into the HSBC scandal earlier this week after receiving information from a whistle-blower who secretly provided a list of HSBC customers, addresses, and account balances to the HMRC. This list identified 4,388 HSBC customers holding £699 million in offshore Jersey accounts, which translates to roughly $1.1 billion US dollars at today’s currency exchange rates. According to the Daily Mail, HSBC “was accused by the US government of fostering such a ‘polluted’ culture it became a conduit for criminal enterprises and faces $1.5 billion in fines.” This includes Mexican drug money laundering and other schemes.

    Over at The Independent, HMRC has issued a press release on the HSBC scandal:

    “We can confirm we have received the data and we are studying it. We receive information from a very wide range of sources which we use to ensure the tax rules are being respected. Clamping down on those who try to cheat the system through evading taxes and over-claiming benefits is a top priority for us, and we value the information we receive from the public and business community.”

    HSBC bank has responded to the HSBC scandal by saying:

    “We are investigating the reports of an alleged loss of certain client data in Jersey as a matter of urgency. We have not been notified of any investigation in relation to this matter by HMRC or any other authority but, should we receive notification, we will co-operate fully with the authorities. HSBC remains fully committed to adoption of the highest global standards including the procedures for the acceptance of clients.”

    This new HSBC scandal is likely to ensure further crackdown on corrupt practices in the banking industry. What do you think about the HSBC scandal?

    Read more at http://www.inquisitr.com/392929/hsbc-scandal-british-bank-accused-of-helping-drug-running-and-arms-dealers/#eQmVVvELctUIheDx.99

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