Gallons Of Gold For Insiders…Again

©Renee 2012

This original post contained the same players so we do this group, yet again..this time however, we have more to add…

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Thomson,_1st_Baron_Thomson_of_Fleet

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thomson_Corporation

This article is primarily about Thomson prior to its merger with Reuters Group. For the current company, see Thomson Reuters. For other companies called Thomson, see Thomson (disambiguation).
The Thomson Corporation
Thomson logo
Former type Public
TSX: TOC
NYSE: TOC
Fate Merger with Reuters Group
Successor(s) Thomson Reuters
Founded 1989
Defunct April 2008
Headquarters Stamford, Connecticut, USA
Key people David Thomson,Shirley Thomson Chairman
Products Books, publishing
Revenue US$6.641 billion (2006)[1]
Net income US$1.120 billion (2006)
Employees 38,000

Thomson Corporation headquarters

The Thomson Corporation was one of the world’s largest information companies. It merged with Reuters Group to form Thomson Reuters in 2008. The Thomson Corporation was active in financial services, healthcare sectors, law, science & technology research, and tax & accounting sectors. The company operated through five segments (2007 onwards): Thomson Financial, Thomson Healthcare, Thomson Legal, Thomson Scientific, and Thomson Tax & Accounting.

Until 2007, Thomson was also a major worldwide provider of higher education textbooks, academic information solutions and reference materials. On October 26, 2006, Thomson announced the proposed sale of its Thomson Learning assets. In May 2007, Thomson Learning was acquired by Apax Partners and subsequently renamed Cengage Learning in July. The Thomson Learning brand was used through the end of August, 2007.[2]

Subsequently, on October 15, 2007, Educational Testing Service (ETS) finalized acquisition of Thomson’s Prometric. Thomson sold its global network of testing centers in 135 countries, for a reported $435 million. Prometric now operates as a wholly owned subsidiary of ETS.[3]

On May 15, 2007, The Thomson Corporation reached an agreement with Reuters to combine the two companies, a deal valued at $17.2 billion. On 17 April 2008 the new company was created under the name of Thomson Reuters. The new CEO of Thomson Reuters is Tom Glocer, the former head of Reuters, while the chairman is David Thomson, formerly of the Thomson Corporation.

Although it was officially a Canadian company and remained Canadian owned, Thomson was run from its operational headquarters in Stamford, Connecticut, in the United States.

Fate Merger with Reuters Group
Successor(s) Thomson Reuters
Founded 1989
Defunct April 2008
Headquarters Stamford, Connecticut, USA
Key people David Thomson,Shirley Thomson Chairman
Products Books, publishing
Revenue US$6.641 billion (2006)[1]
Net income US$1.120 billion (2006)
Employees 38,000
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24 Responses to Gallons Of Gold For Insiders…Again

  1. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apax_Partners
    Apax Partners LLP is a global private equity and venture capital firm, headquartered in London. The company also operates out of eight other offices in New York, Hong Kong, Mumbai, Tel-Aviv, Madrid, Stockholm, Milan and Munich. The firm, including its various predecessors, have raised approximately $35 billion (USD) dating back to 1969. Apax Partners is one of the oldest and largest private equity firms operating on an international basis, ranked the seventh largest private equity firm globally.[1]

    Apax invests exclusively in certain business sectors including: telecommunications, information technology, retail and consumer products, media, healthcare and financial and business services. As of the end of 2007, Apax had invested in approximately 340 companies in all stages of development.

    Apax raises capital for its investment funds through institutional investors including corporate and public pension funds, university and college endowments, foundations and fund of funds. One of the firm’s co-founders, Alan Patricof, was an early investor in Apple Computer and America Online (AOL).

  2. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Patricof
    Alan Patricof (born 1935) is an American investor and one of the early pioneers of the venture capital and private equity industries. Patricof founded Apax Partners (based on a play on Patricof’s name: Alan Patricof Associates Cross (x) Border), which is today one of the largest private equity firms globally.

    Over the course of his 40-year career in private equity, Patricof has been instrumental in growing the venture capital field from a base of high net-worth individuals to its position today with broad institutional backing, as well as playing a key role in the essential legislative initiatives that have guided its evolution.

    Patricof was an early investor in venture capital and has been involved in the development of numerous major companies including America Online, Office Depot, Cadence Design Systems, Apple Computer and FORE Systems. He was a founder and chairman of the board of New York magazine, which later acquired the Village Voice and New West magazine.[1] Patricof also acquired style magazine Details in 1987.[2] He has also been involved with Cellular Communications, Inc., NTL, and Audible.

    By the mid-1990s Apax had become one of the larger private equity firms globally. In 2001, Patricof stepped back from day-to-day management of Apax Partners, Inc., the US arm of the firm to return to his original focus on making venture capital investments in small early-stage companies. In 2006, Patricof left Apax to form Greycroft Partners which focuses on small early-stage venture capital investments.

    Patricof received his undergraduate education in finance from Ohio State University and earned his MBA from Columbia Business School in 1957.[3]

    [edit] Personal lifePatricof has been married twice:

    He was married to Bette Patricof Hollander.[4][5][6] They later divorced. They had one child:
    Mark F. Patricof (b. 1964) who is married to Martha Shelburne Jones, a daughter of Anne Shelburne Jones and Bishop Edward Witker Jones of Indianapolis. Her father was then bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Indianapolis.[4][5] They have two children: Lily and Nina.
    His second marriage was to Susan Hatkoff Patricoff.[7] They have two sons:
    Jamie Patricof, movie and television producer. He is married to former model Kelly Sawyer.[8] They have two children: Riley and Sawyer.
    Jonathon Cale Patricof (b. 1973) who is married to Victoria Ann Radford of New York.[9] They have two children: John Jr. and Chloe.[10][11]
    [edit] Political and other affiliationsPatricof has been active in Democratic Party politics, contributing to candidates including Bill and Hillary Clinton,[12][13][14][15] whom he met in the Hamptons when they were there as guests of lobbyist and Democratic activist Liz Robbins.[16] Patricof serves on the Board of Trustees of Columbia University Graduate School of Business.[citation needed] As of 2011[update] he serves as an advisor to the Grassroots Business Fund.

  3. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Ronald_Cohen
    Sir Ronald Cohen (born 1945) is an Egyptian-born British businessman and political figure, known as “the father of British venture capital”[1] and “the father of social investment.
    Cohen was born in Egypt; his family are Sephardi Jews, originally from Aleppo, Syria, though his mother, Sonia Douek, is English by nationality. In 1957, following the Suez Crisis, Cohen’s family was forced to abandon all their assets and flee Egyptian President Nassar’s persecution of Jews.[3] The family (including younger brother Andre) moved to England. Though initially speaking only a few words of English, Cohen went to Orange Hill grammar school in North London, now part of Mill Hill County High School where despite describing it as “a school of very doubtful reputation”[4] he excelled.

    Cohen won a scholarship to Oxford University, where he became President of the Oxford Union, and earned a degree in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at Exeter College. He subsequently attended Harvard Business School, where he was a member of the Harvard Business School Rugby Club.

    [edit] BusinessAfter leaving Harvard Business School, Cohen worked as a management consultant for McKinsey & Company in the United Kingdom and Italy. In 1972, along with two former business school colleagues as partners, he founded Apax Partners, one of Britain’s first venture capital firms. The company grew slowly at first, but expanded rapidly in the 1990s, becoming Britain’s largest venture capital firm, and “one of three truly global venture capital firms”.[3] Apax provided startup capital for over 500 companies, and provided money for many others, including AOL, Virgin Radio, Waterstone’s, and PPL Therapeutics, the company that cloned Dolly the sheep. In 1996 Cohen helped establish Easdaq, a technology focused stock exchange intended to be the European counterpart to the American Nasdaq. He is the recipient of a Jubilee Award for services to Israeli business, awarded by Benjamin Netanyahu and the BVCA’s Lifetime Achievement Award. He is a member of the Harvard Board of Overseers and is also a fellow of Exeter College, Oxford.

    In 2002, alongside Jon Moulton, he was the inaugural inductee into the Private Equity Hall of Fame, at the British Venture Capital Association and Real Deals’ Private Equity Awards.

    ***NOTE***
    ****Douek****

    Soundex Code for Douek = D200
    Other surnames sharing this Soundex Code:
    DACH | DAGGY | DAGUE | DAKE | DASEY | DASH | DAWES | DEAKE | DEAS | DECK | DEEG | DEEKS | DEES | DEESE | DEHAAS | DEJ | DEWEES | DEWEESE | DIAS | DIAZ | DICE | DICK | DICKEY | DICKIE | DICKS | DIEZ | DIGGS | DIKE | DISS | DIX | DOAK | DOIG | DOSS | DOWIS | DOXSIE | DUCK | DUGUAY | DUKE | DUSCH | DYAS | DYESS | DYKE |

    ***
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Ann_Duke
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doris_Duke
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patty_Duke
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duke_Energy

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Rezko
    Rezko was born in 1955 in Aleppo, Syria, to a prominent Syriac Catholic family.[2] After graduating from college there, Rezko moved to Chicago and earned an undergraduate and a master’s degree in civil engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology in the late 1970s. He joined an engineering company, designing nuclear power plants, then left to design roads for the state Transportation Department, making $21,590 in his first year there.[3][4]

    [edit] CareerSoon after beginning his career as a civil engineer, Rezko started in real estate buying vacant lots and developing single family residences and investing in fast-food restaurants, including the first Subway in Chicago. Many properties were in lower-income African American neighborhoods.[2][5] Then, meeting Jabir Herbert (J.H.) Muhammad, former manager of heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali and son of the late Nation of Islam leader, Elijah Muhammad, he was asked in 1983 to support the successful mayoral candidacy of Harold Washington. Muhammad’s company, Crucial Concessions, which Rezko went to work for in 1984, won a food contract at the Lake Michigan beaches and in many South Side parks after Washington became the first black mayor of Chicago. Rezko put together endorsement deals for Ali, became the executive director of the Muhammad Ali Foundation, and traveled the world with Ali for five years.

    NOTE ***Both men above born in Aleppo, Syria ***

    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2012/09/13/a-duke-and-a-king-again/

  4. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Ronald_Cohen
    After leaving Harvard Business School, Cohen worked as a management consultant for McKinsey & Company in the United Kingdom and Italy. In 1972, along with two former business school colleagues as partners, he founded Apax Partners, one of Britain’s first venture capital firms. The company grew slowly at first, but expanded rapidly in the 1990s, becoming Britain’s largest venture capital firm, and “one of three truly global venture capital firms”.[3] Apax provided startup capital for over 500 companies, and provided money for many others, including AOL, Virgin Radio, Waterstone’s, and PPL Therapeutics, the company that cloned Dolly the sheep. In 1996 Cohen helped establish Easdaq, a technology focused stock exchange intended to be the European counterpart to the American Nasdaq. He is the recipient of a Jubilee Award for services to Israeli business, awarded by Benjamin Netanyahu and the BVCA’s Lifetime Achievement Award. He is a member of the Harvard Board of Overseers and is also a fellow of Exeter College, Oxford.

    In 2002, alongside Jon Moulton, he was the inaugural inductee into the Private Equity Hall of Fame, at the British Venture Capital Association and Real Deals’ Private Equity Awards.

  5. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McKinsey_%26_Company
    McKinsey & Company was founded in 1926 in Chicago by James McKinsey under the name James O. McKinsey & Company.[4][5] Previously, James McKinsey served as an accounting professor at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and is considered the father of managerial accounting.[6] Advocates for the concepts introduced in McKinsey’s book, Budgetary Control, were among McKinsey’s first clients.[6][7] The book founded the practice of managerial accounting.[6]

    Mr. McKinsey hired Tom Kearney and Marvin Bower in the early 1930s.[4][8] In 1935,[9] In 1935, Marshall Field’s became a client and in 1935 convinced McKinsey to leave the firm to accept a temporary position and become its Chairman and CEO, in order to help the company through a restructuring.[7][10] After McKinsey left, the remaining members of the firm agreed to merge with the accounting firm Scovell, Wellington & Company in 1935, leading to the creation of McKinsey, Wellington & Co.[9]

    In 1937 James O. McKinsey died unexpectedly of pneumonia, which led to the division of McKinsey, Wellington & Company in 1939. C. Oliver Wellington returned to manage Scovell, Wellington & Company full-time and took the accounting practice with him. The management engineering practice was split into two affiliated firms: McKinsey & Company and McKinsey, Kearney & Company. McKinsey & Company was led by Guy Crockett, Dick Fletcher, and Marvin Bower.[citation needed] Guy Crockett became Managing Partner of McKinsey & Company, running day-to-day operations, while Marvin Bower handled conceptual and long-term strategy as Crockett’s deputy.[9] Bower would lead the company for 30 years with a focus on being “professional” in looks, tone, and conduct.[11]

    McKinsey & Company is credited with creating modern management consulting as a professional service.[9][12] Marvin Bower is credited with shaping the firm’s values and principles.[13] Bower’s idea was to create a management consulting firm working with senior executives with the same professional standards he had witnessed as a lawyer for the firm of Jones Day Reavis & Pogue,[14] in Cleveland.[7]

    In New York, Bower established the firm’s core principles in a 1937 memo.[9][15] According to Fortune Magazine:

    “A McKinsey consultant is supposed to put the interests of his client ahead of increasing The Firm’s revenues; he should keep his mouth shut about his client’s affairs; he should tell the truth and not be afraid to challenge a client’s opinion; and he should only agree to perform work that he feels is both necessary and something McKinsey can do well. Along with the professional code, Bower insisted on professional, as opposed to business, language, which is why McKinsey is always The Firm, never the company; jobs are engagements; and The Firm has a practice, not a business.”[7]

    [edit] 1940s and 1950sIn the early 1940s, Bower placed more emphasis on persuading clients to accept and act on its recommendations. In 1945 the firm established a New Engagement and Executive Relations Guide.[9]

    In 1950 Guy Crockett stepped down as managing director and Bower served as the firm’s managing director until 1967. The firm’s profit-sharing, executive and planning committees were formed in 1951.[9] In 1953 McKinsey began hiring consultants straight out of business school. Bower decided to hire and train primarily young graduates at a time when most consultants were mature executives and experienced professionals.[15] The postwar period was a time of expansion for McKinsey and the economy in general. McKinsey’s client base grew to include several bluechip, defense contractors, government, and military organizations.[13]

    The “up or out” philosophy, which says that consultants should find a role outside of the firm if they are not advancing, was first implemented in 1954[citation needed] after years of internal consensus building. The move was internally controversial. The McKinsey ownership plan was adopted to improve incentives in 1956 and more guidelines were formalized on profit sharing, promotions, and elections. After seven years of deliberation, McKinsey turned itself into a private corporation with shares exclusive to McKinsey employees. McKinsey’s planning committee developed a plan for international expansion and established an office in London in 1959.[9] By 1952 McKinsey & Company formally parted ways with McKinsey, Kearney & Company, which was renamed A.T. Kearney & Company.

    [edit] 1960 – 1990In 1964 McKinsey started publishing the McKinsey Quarterly, a business journal written primarily by McKinsey consultants.[16] In the 1970s, McKinsey was faced with a loss of market-share[13] and began investing in what it called “systematic knowledge-building”.[7]

    After stepping down as managing director in 1967, Marvin Bower sold his shares back to McKinsey believing this would give young partners a sense of ownership in the firm.[7] Future consultants followed his example.[13] In 1976, Ron Daniel was elected managing director and served until 1988.[17] Daniel worked for McKinsey for almost fifty years and led the New York office.[17] From 1977 to 1981, a group of 15-20 partners organized to address the issue of clients not acting on McKinsey’s advice.[18]

    Fred Gluck was McKinsey’s managing director from 1988 to 1994.[citation needed] Under Gluck’s tenure, McKinsey increased its international focus by opening 17 new offices outside the United States. He also created an internal network for sharing knowledge and experience among McKinsey consultants[19] and spent $50 million on knowledge building.[7] Over two decades McKinsey & Company grew eightfold.[14] In 1989 the firm acquired the Information Consulting Group (ICG), but a culture clash[clarification needed] caused many ICG employees to leave.[13]

    [edit] 1990sIn 1990, the firm established an economics think tank on globalization, corporate strategy and governance called the McKinsey Global Institute.[citation needed] Firm revenues more than doubled from 1993 to 2004 with 20 new offices and twice as many employees.[13] In 1994 Rajat Gupta became the first non-American-born partner to be elected as the firm’s managing director.[20] By the end of his tenure, McKinsey had grown from 2,900 to 7,000 consultants, who were working across 82 offices in over 40 countries.[21][22]

    In the 1990s, Anil Kumar set up “accelerators” for smaller internet startups to get started, accepting stock-based reimbursement for its services.[23][22] The Business Technology Office was started in 1997 to focus on IT consulting and was growing at an annualized rate of 30% by 2003.

  6. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anil_Kumar

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rajat_Gupta
    Rajat Kumar Gupta (RA-jat ku-MAAR GUP-ta; Bengali: রজত গুপ্ত; born 2 December 1948) is an Indian American businessman who was the managing director (chief executive) of management consultancy McKinsey & Company from 1994 to 2003 and a business leader in India and the United States. He was convicted in June 2012 on insider trading charges stemming from the Raj Rajaratnam-led Galleon Group case on four criminal felony counts of conspiracy and securities fraud. He was sentenced in October 2012 to two years in prison, an additional year on supervised release and ordered to pay $5 million in fines.[3]

    In his capacity at McKinsey, Gupta was recognized as the first Indian-born CEO of a global Western company. After becoming a senior partner emeritus at McKinsey, Gupta served as corporate chairman, board director or strategic advisor to a variety of large and notable organizations: corporations including Goldman Sachs, Procter and Gamble and American Airlines, and non-profits including The Gates Foundation, The Global Fund and the International Chamber of Commerce.

    Rajat Gupta is additionally the co-founder of four different organizations: the Indian School of Business with Anil Kumar, the American India Foundation with Victor Menezes and Lata Krishnan, New Silk Route with Parag Saxena and Victor Menezes, and Scandent with Ramesh Vangal.

    ***NOTE**Both men above and KUMAR name..*

  7. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ian_Davis
    Ian Davis (born 1952) was a longtime top senior partner and director at management consultancy McKinsey & Company, serving as managing director (chief executive) from 2003 to 2009. He succeeded Rajat Gupta on July 1, 2003. He joined McKinsey in 1979, retired in 2010 and currently serves as a senior partner emeritus.

    Davis was born in Kent, UK. Prior to becoming managing director, he was office manager of McKinsey’s London and UK office. He has an undergraduate degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics from Balliol College, Oxford University.[1] He is a member of the board of BP.

    He is the brother of Reed Elsevier chairman Crispin Davis.[2]

    From Davis’s bio: Mr Davis is a Non-Executive Director at Johnson & Johnson Inc, BP plc, Teach For All Inc, Big Society Trust and Majid Al Futtaim Holdings LLC. He is a Senior Adviser to Apax Partners LLP, a Non-Executive Board Member at the UK Cabinet Office and an Advisory Director of King Abdullah Petroleum Studies and Research Centre.

    [edit] MembershipsNon-executive Director BP plc since 2 April 2010[3]
    Independent Non-Executive Director Johnson & Johnson Inc
    Non-Executive Director Majid Al Futtaim Holdings LLC
    Non-Executive Director Teach For All Inc
    Non-Executive Director Big Society Trust
    Non-Executive Member of UK Cabinet Office
    Senior Adviser to McKinsey & Company
    Senior Adviser to Apax LLP
    Advisory Director to King Abdullah Petroleum Study and Research Centre
    International Business Council of the World Economic Forum
    Conference Board, member Board of Trustees
    Cambridge Judge Business School, University of Cambridge, Advisory Board member
    City of Beijing, Advisory Board member

    http://www.bp.com/sectiongenericarticle.do?categoryId=9033139&contentId=7060705

  8. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crispin_Davis
    Sir Crispin Davis, OBE (born 1949, England), is the Chairman and Director of StarBev Netherlands BV. He was previously chairman of the board and the chief executive officer of Reed Elsevier Group PLC, and he is a non-executive director of GlaxoSmithKline PLC.[1] Sir Crispin has also served as the chief executive officer of Aegis Group PLC from 1994 until 1999. He was a board member at Guinness PLC, and the group managing director of United Distillers from 1990 to 1993. For twenty years, he served at Procter and Gamble, in senior positions in the United Kingdom, Germany, and North America.

    Davis earned a bachelor’s degree from Oriel College at Oxford University. He was knighted by Queen Elizabeth in 2004 for services to the information industry[2]. Davis and his wife, Anne, have three daughters.

    He is the brother of former McKinsey & Company managing director Ian Davis.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reed_Elsevier

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GlaxoSmithKline

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Procter_and_Gamble

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Distillers
    United Distillers was a Scottish company formed in 1987 from combining the businesses of Distillers Company and Arthur Bell & Sons, both owned by Guinness. The company owned six Scotch whisky brands, which were relaunched as the Classic Malts range. It also owned the Bernheim distillery (now owned by Heaven Hill) and the Stizel-Weller distillery, both in Louisville, Kentucky in the United States.

    In 1997 Guinness merged with Grand Metropolitan to create Diageo, and in 1998 United Distillers was merged with International Distillers & Vintners to create United Distillers & Vintners.

    In 2001 the company was renamed Guinness United Distillers & Vintners Scotland, and then renamed once again in 2002 to become Diageo Scotland (registered in Scotland, No. SC000750).

    [edit] See alsoGuinness share-trading fraud
    [edit] External linksCompany history on Diageo website

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guinness

  9. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomson_Reuters
    Thomson Reuters Corporation is a Canadian media and financial-data firm based in New York City. It was created by the Thomson Corporation’s purchase of Reuters Group on 17 April 2008.[3] The Woodbridge Company, a holding company for the Thomson family of Canada, owns 53% of the group,[4] which operates in 100 countries, and has 60,000 employees. Thomson Reuters was ranked as Canada’s “leading corporate brand” in the 2010 Interbrand Best Canadian Brands ranking.[5] It is headquartered at 3 Times Square, Manhattan, New York City.

  10. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Woodbridge_Company
    The Woodbridge Company Limited is a Canadian private holding company and the principal and controlling shareholder (55 percent) of Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters was formed in 2008, when The Thomson Corporation acquired Reuters.

    The company also owns the largest (85 percent) interest in The Globe and Mail Inc. In late 2010, Woodbridge sold its 40-percent interest in CTVglobemedia, a Canadian multimedia company with ownership of CTV, to BCE Inc.[1]

    Woodbridge is the primary investment vehicle for members of the family of the late Roy Thomson, the first Lord Thomson of Fleet. David Thomson and his brother, Peter Thomson, became chairmen of Woodbridge upon the death of their father, Kenneth Thomson in 2006. Woodbridge is based in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Geoff Beattie is president of the company.

    [edit] See alsoTorstar
    Metroland Media Group
    Star Media Group
    Quebecor Media
    Sun Media
    Postmedia Network – successor to Canwest and Southam Newspapers
    [edit] References^ Canada (2010-09-10). “Woodbridge Acquires Direct Ownership of The Globe and Mail”. CNW. http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/September2010/10/c8647.html. Retrieved 2011-01-05.
    [edit] External linksProfile of The Woodbridge Company

  11. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Thomson,_3rd_Baron_Thomson_of_Fleet

    Born David Kenneth Roy Thomson
    (1957-06-12) 12 June 1957 (age 55)
    Spouse(s) Mary Lou La Prairie (1988–1997)
    Laurie Ludwick (2000–2005)
    Partner(s) Kelly Rowan (2007–2008)
    Children 3
    Parents Kenneth Thomson, 2nd Baron Thomson of Fleet
    Nora Marilyn Lavis Thomson
    Relatives Roy Thomson, 1st Baron Thomson of Fleet (Grandfather)
    Edna Thomson (Grandmother)
    Peter Thomson (Brother)
    Shirley Thomson (Sister)
    Taylor Thomson (Sister)

  12. Renee says:

    (GEITHER Ben )

    patriarch G. Ben Thompson – Rose speaks http://www.rosespeaks.com/tag/patriarch-g-ben-thompson/

    Oct 30, 2011 … Wonder what the patriarch, G. Ben Thompson, thinks of Ford Shelley taking down some of the Thompson family with him, like Gaither B …

    G. Ben Thompson – MyrtleBeachOnline.com http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com/2010/08/25/1653990/mb-developer-testifies-in-anna...

    Aug 25, 2010 … A man who had an affair with Anna Nicole Smith in the last year of her life testified Tuesday that she became groggy when she took …

    Anna Nicole Smith Lawsuit Dismissed Against G. Ben Thompson http://www.hollywoodgrind.com/anna-nicole-smith-lawsuit-dismissed-against-g-ben-th...

    Jan 22, 2007 … First G. Ben Thompson sued Anna Nicole Smith to evict her from his property, then Smith sued Thompson saying he gave her the house in the …

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