Good Fortune… Trails Of Glass Slippers

Renee ©2012

To follow the complicated paths of royal women, one does find shards in the road. They ask the right questions at the right times like “Who owns this ?” or “Who is your family ?” Those are the only real questions to ask in their eyes maybe ?

Gold diggers, ladder climbers, cash cows, money breeders, royal chasers, harlots…they have been called all of the names that seem to fit but do those names fit ?  Maybe for some, but each person is different. Let us take a look. Rich and powerful men are known to sell off their assets for future gain. Their girls are considered a big asset as well if they find good fortune.

Let’s start with Princess Fadilla, Fadila, Fazila of Egypt. Daughter of Robert Loeb and wife Paulie Madeleine Picard. She was born as Dominique France Picard. I will post info as well on the dit la Fortune (Fontaine), Hughes, Perrot (Parrott), Sutton, Black, Smith etc.. family connections.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominique-France_Picard

Then we have Princess Fawzia that was Queen of Iran for a while.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princess_Fawzia_Fuad_of_Egypt

The rest we will cover in comments.

Don’t step in the broken glass.

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124 Responses to Good Fortune… Trails Of Glass Slippers

  1. Renee says:

    http://corporate.findlaw.com/contracts/compensation/executive-employment-agreement-enron-corp-and-joseph-w-sutton.html
    By Enron Corp.

    AMENDMENT TO EXECUTIVE EMPLOYMENT AGREEMENT
    BETWEEN ENRON CORP. AND JOSEPH W. SUTTON

    This Agreement, made, entered into and effective as of
    the 5th day of May, 1999 (the ‘Effective Date’), by and
    between Enron Corp., an Oregon corporation, having offices
    at 1400 Smith Street, Houston, Texas 77002 (‘Employer’), and
    Joseph W. Sutton, an individual currently residing at 31
    Half Moon Court, The Woodlands, Texas 77380 (‘Employee’), is
    an amendment to that certain Executive Employment Agreement
    between Enron Corp. and Employee, effective the 23rd day of
    June, 1998 (the ‘Executive Employment Agreement’).

    WHEREAS, the parties desire to amend the Executive
    Employment Agreement to change the provisions for Long Term
    Incentive Compensation in Exhibit A thereto;

    NOW, THEREFORE, in consideration of the covenants
    contained herein, and for other good and valuable
    consideration, the parties agree as follows:

    1. The provision for Long Term Incentive Compensation in
    Exhibit A to the Executive Employment Agreement is deleted
    and the following is inserted in its place:

    ‘Long Term Incentive Compensation:

    Employee shall receive the following long term
    incentive compensation.

    For 1998: (1) a grant pursuant to the Enron Corp. 1991
    Stock Plan (’91 Stock Plan’) of Restricted Stock in
    January, 1999, or in January of a subsequent year if
    the following cumulative provisions apply, having a
    grant value of $1,060,000 and conditioned on Enron
    International meeting at least 80% of its 1998 after
    tax net income target (‘80% Target’); such 80% Target
    shall be a cumulative percentage over a five year
    period beginning with 1998 so that if the employee
    misses a target in any single year, the employee shall
    have the ability to receive such a grant in a future
    year based on a cumulative year average of 80% or
    greater; such a grant of Restricted Stock shall vest
    25% on the date of grant and thereafter, conditioned on
    Employee’s continued employment with Employer, in
    annual 25% increments on the anniversary dates of said
    grant, and (2) a grant pursuant to the ’91 Stock Plan
    of 100,000 Stock Options made at the time of entering
    into this Agreement, to vest, conditioned on Employee’s
    continued employment with Employer, in increments of
    25% on December 31 on each of the next four years.

    For years 1999 through 2002, Employee shall be granted
    Stock Options pursuant to the ’91 Stock Plan having a
    value based on Black Scholes (as determined annually by
    the Compensation Committee of the Enron Corp. Board of
    Directors similar to other Enron Corp. executives) of
    $1,060,000 for each year. For example if the Black
    Scholes value of an Enron Corp. Stock Option was
    $10.60, Employee would receive 100,000 Stock Options
    ($1,060,000/$10.60) These Stock Options will be
    granted on 12/31/98, 12/31/99, 12/31/00, and 12/31/01
    and shall vest, conditioned on Employee’s continued
    employment with Employer, in 25% increments on December
    31 of each of the four years following the date of
    grant.

    Employee shall also receive grants pursuant to the ’91
    Stock Plan of Restricted Stock in January 2000, 2001,
    2002 and 2003, or in January of a subsequent year (but
    no subsequent year later than January 2003) if the
    following cumulative provision apply, each having a
    grant value of $1,060,000, conditioned on Enron
    International meeting at least 80% of its after tax net
    income target (‘80% Target’) for calendar years 1999,
    2000, 2001 and 2002, respectively. Such 80% Target
    shall be a cumulative percentage over the five year
    period (1998 – 2002) so that if an 80% Target is not
    met for any single year, during the 1998 – 2002 period,
    Employee may become eligible to receive such grant for
    such a missed year if the cumulative average of such
    80% Targets for such missed year and prior or
    subsequent year(s) during this 1998 – 2002 period meets
    or exceeds the cumulative 80% Targets. Such grants of
    Restricted Stock will vest 25% on the date of grant and
    thereafter, conditioned on Employee’s continued
    employment with Employer, in annual 25% increments on
    the anniversary dates of such grants.

    Each grant of long term incentive compensation pursuant
    to the ’91 Stock Plan shall have standard termination
    provisions and be evidenced by a written award
    agreement.’

    2. This Agreement is an amendment to the Executive
    Employment Agreement, and the parties agree that all other
    terms, conditions and stipulations contained in the
    Executive Employment Agreement shall remain in full force
    and effect and without any change or modification, except as
    provided herein.

    IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties have duly executed this
    Agreement as of the Effective Date.

    ENRON CORP.

    By: /s/ MARY K. JOYCE
    Name: Mary K. Joyce
    Title: Vice President
    This ____ day of ______, 1999

    JOSEPH W. SUTTON

  2. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enron

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gray_Davis

    http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,216386,00.html

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Andersen

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_Trust

    ***NOTE*** SMITH***
    Northern Trust Corporation is an international financial services company headquartered in Chicago, Illinois, USA. It provides investment management, asset and fund administration, fiduciary and banking services through a network of 85 offices in 18 U.S. states and 12 international offices in North America, Europe and the Asia-Pacific region. As of June 30, 2012, Northern Trust Corporation had $94 billion in banking assets, $4.56 trillion in assets under custody and $704 billion in assets under management. In March 2010, Forbes Magazine ranked Northern Trust as the world’s most admired company in the “Superregional Banks” category.

    Northern Trust was founded in 1889 by Byron Laflin Smith in a one-room office in the Rookery Building in Chicago’s Loop, with a focus on providing trust and banking services for the city’s prosperous citizens.[3] Smith provided 40% of the bank’s original capitalization of $1 million, and counted such businessmen and civic leaders as Marshall Field, Martin A. Ryerson, and Philip D. Armour among the original 27 shareholders. Intimately acquainted with the operations of the bank, these men would personally examine Northern’s assets and records at each year’s end.

    http://theobamahustle.wordpress.com/tag/northern-trust/

  3. Renee says:

    http://drkatesview.wordpress.com/2012/05/07/francis-xavier-sutton-and-the-ford-foundation/

    http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Francis_X._Sutton
    Francis X. Sutton “spent most of his career at the Ford Foundation where he served as programme officer (1954-62), representative for East and Central Africa (1963-67), deputy vice-president and acting vice-president (1967-1983). Born in 1917 he studied mathematics and social sciences at Temple (BSc 1938), Princeton (MAMaths 1940) and Harvard (Ph.D, Sociology, 1950). He was a member of the Society of Fellows at Harvard from 1946-49 and taught there to 1954. Since retiring from the Ford Foundation, he has been Acting President of the Social Science Research Council (1985-86), member and chairman of its board (1985-92); consultant to the World Bank, USAID, and the Rockefeller Foundation, where he served recently as interim Director of its Rockefeller Study and Conference Center, Bellagio ‘ Italy (1991-92). He is the author of The American Business Creed (1956), Ideology and Social Structure (1991) and editor of A World to Make/ Development in Perspective (1990). He was the chief consultant and principal draughtsman for the Harvard Committee Report on the AKU (1983).” [1]

    Chancellor’s Commission Member, Aga Khan University
    Advisory Board, Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society
    Resources and articlesRelated Sourcewatch articlesReferences↑ Chancellor’s Commission Members, Aga Khan University, accessed August 29, 2008.

    http://beatl.barnard.columbia.edu/cuhistory/fordfoundation.htm
    1. The Ford Foundation and Universities in the 1950s and 1960s

    The old giants of the foundation world, Rockefeller and Carnegie, came out of the oil and steel industries. When the automobile industry came along, only old Henry Ford Senior was cranky enough with stockholders to buy them out and lay the base for a very big foundation. We are now in the era when pharmaceuticals and electronics make the biggest foundations, with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation rising to compete with the Wellcome Trust of Great Britain as the biggest philanthropy.’

    The Ford Foundation now sinks behind these newcomers, ranking only third among American foundations with $11.4 billion in assets. But when it fell heir to the fortunes of Henry Senior and Edsel Ford in 1950 it was of unprecedented size and it was for more than 40 years the largest foundation. Even with an unrealistically low public valuation of $ 417 million in 1951 it towered over its famous predecessors, Carnegie Corporation and the Rockefeller Foundation, each of which had less than $ 200 million at the time2. In 1956 in one grand largesse it distributed more money (in current dollars) than the Rockefeller Foundation had in its whole history.

    Huge as it was in the philanthropic world of the 1950s, Ford’s eminence and power in American society seemed less imposing than the pioneers of big philanthropy had been, earlier in the century when the economy was smaller and government still modest. Dwight Macdonald in a 1955 series of New Yorker articles that became a book entitled, The Ford Foundation, The Men and the Millions 3 , thought the golden age of foundations had ended in the 1920s and Ford had come along in a silver age. Carnegie and Rockefeller had felt themselves big enough in the years before 1920 to try to transform the whole of American higher education. Carnegie aimed to do it through the qualifying conditions for admission to its pension scheme ; and the Rockefeller General Education Board tried through endowment grants to execute John D. senior’s 1905 charge to “promote a comprehensive system of higher education in the U. S.”4 The Carnegie effort almost bankrupted the foundation and evolved into what we live under as TIAA-CREF. By 1926, the General Education Board conceded that the scale of the national need was getting beyond its resources.

    The Ford Foundation might have emerged in a philanthropic silver age but its scale in relation to American higher education was still quite formidable. Not long ago, I asked Derek Bok how Harvard’s endowment had gotten to be bigger than Ford’s. “We save our money up here”, was his brisk and unhelpful reply. In 1950, Harvard’s endowment was, as it is now, the biggest in the country, but at $ 191 million it was less than half of Ford’s. Yale’s endowment was then $ 125 million, Texas’s oil wealth gave its University $ 102 million, and Columbia ranked fourth with $ 82 million.5 The rapid appreciation of Ford’s wealth during the 1950s brought its assets to $ 3.6 billions in 1960 at a time when, according to the the U.S. Statistical Abstract, the total of endowments for all U.S. institutions of higher education was $ 5.4 billion. It was thus not obviously out of the question for Ford to have ambitions like Carnegie and Rockefeller had had in the golden past, of affecting American higher education in some macroscopic way. It indeed made some such efforts.

    A general, heroic assault on the whole of the nation’s higher education has not, of course, been the normal way the largest foundations have busied themselves with the higher learning. They have usually focussed on more limited objectives. A particularly close relationship between the large “general purpose’, foundations and the universities followed from the doctrines of rational philanthropy that grew up in the first half of this now fading century. Foundations were to take long views, seeking causes not immediate remedies, and insofar as possible basing their actions on objective scientific research and analysis. More commonly than not such research and analysis had its homes in universities and they were the places where people learned how to do it.

    When Ford was being planned in the late 1940s it studied what its predecessors, especially the Rockefeller Foundation, had done and followed them as models. Since we now are in an era when prevailing doctrines among foundations are not what they used to be, when “action” competes more strongly with “research” than it did in the 1950s, and ties to major universities are less central to the strategies of most foundations, the Ford Foundation looks to have been established in an old-fashioned mode. It wanted to tackle social problems, not develop academic disciplines, but it turned quickly to universities, as its models had before.

    Both in its design and in its choice of programs Ford bore the marks of its founding era. The post-war anxiety over the maintenance of world peace and the precariousness of democracy throughout the world gave Ford a more strongly international emphasis than any of the major American foundations since established has had.6 Under Paul Hoffman’s initial leadership, its international programs sprang up quickly to levels that soon made the international vice-president, Don Price, feel uncomfortable at claiming too much of the budget. Ford also came at a time when the Federal government had learned to give major support to the sciences, and, within the philanthropic world, it was conscious of Rockefeller’s major commitment to health and medicine. Hughes and Gates and others now see their way to major investments in the health field; Ford’s planners thought they had to look elsewhere; a field that could have easily absorbed a large part of its resources looked pre-empted. Along with its commitment to promoting peace where it found plenty to do, Ford also set out to strength democratic institutions, promote economic growth and better understanding of human behavior. These were objectives that did not readily translate into major programs absorbing large chunks of Ford’s wealth. Education, on the other hand, was both prominent in Ford’s declared interests as laid down by Rowan Gaither’s famous Study Group, and it was a field that could readily use huge (and in the McCarthy era, blessedly non�controversial) expenditures. Under the confident initial guidance of Robert Maynard Hutchins, Ford’s educational commitments quickly became the principal competitor to to its international ones.

    The early relations between New York’s new Maecenas in midtown and the ancient and august university on Morningside Heights were thus largely set in the contexts of Ford’s international and educational interests. There were of course numerous grants from Ford to Columbia under others of their mutual interests. But the largest amounts came under international and educational rubrics. When McGeorge Bundy came to Ford’s presidency in 1966 as an even newer New Yorker, he asked his barons on a “strictly confidential” basis what their dealings and views on Columbia were and had been7. John Howard, who presided over the International Training and Research Program and an International Legal Studies program had the largest numbers to report. He counted some $ 21 million in 18 grants to Columbia for international purposes, beginning in 19538. This was more than 40% of the $ 50.1 million Ford had given Columbia by October 1966, and deserves an early and prominent place in this narration.

    II. Ford’s Role in Columbia’s Internationalization: Timely Help or Complicity?

    Some years ago when philanthropy was the subject of one of Columbia’s University Seminars, its financial vice-president took the opportunity to chide a visitor from the Ford Foundation. He claimed that Ford had led Columbia into international investments it could ill afford and thereby damaged its general well-being. This evening gives an occasion for belated reflection on the charge.

    With the calm precision that may have come from his training as physical chemist, John Howard described for Bundy how $ 21 million had gone to Columbia for international purposes. The largest grants were one of $ 5.5 million for area studies in 1960 and another of $ 10.9 million in 1965 that provided $ 2.5 million for endowment of five chairs, $ 2.5 million toward a new building for the School of International Affairs, and $ 5.9 million in program funds to be expended over five years. There had also been a grant of $ 1.5 million for International Legal Studies, $ 1.3 million of which in fact responded to Dean Warren’s eloquent plea for a new building for the Law School.9 The other international grants ranged down from a 1956 grant of $ 1.275 million for “training and research in international affairs” to a 1962 grant of $ 2,000 for a “paperback book of documents on International Communism”.

    more at link above

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Bank

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Hoffman

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_G._Hoffman

    G for GRAY*** like Gov. GRAY Davis of ENRON fame…
    Paul Gray Hoffman (26 April 1891 – 8 October 1974, New York City) was an American automobile company executive, statesman and global development aid administrator.

    Hoffman was born in Western Springs, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. He quit college at 18 to sell Studebaker cars in Los Angeles, had made his first million dollars by the age of 34 and became president of Studebaker ten years later. Hoffman and Harold Sines Vance were the two executives most responsible for rescuing Studebaker from insolvency in the 1930s.[1]:p.98-104

    Hoffman being sworn in as administrator of the Economic Recovery Corporation (1948)From 1935 to 1948, Hoffman served as president of Studebaker. He took a leave of absence to spend a two-year term (1948–50) as director of the Economic Cooperation Administration, administering the Marshall Plan aid program to Europe following World War II. From 1950 to 1953, he also served as the president of the Ford Foundation.

    Returning to Studebaker in 1953, Hoffman was chairman of the corporation during the turbulent period leading up to and during the 1954 merger with the Packard Motor Car Company. When Studebaker-Packard found itself nearing insolvency in 1956, the company entered into an Eisenhower Administration-brokered management agreement with Curtiss-Wright. Hoffman, Vance (who had become chairman of the executive committee after the Packard merger) and S-P president James J. Nance all left the company.

    From 1966 to 1972 he was the first administrator of the United Nations Development Programme when it was founded, with David Owen as his co-administrator.[2]

    On June 21, 1974, Mr. Hoffman was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Gerald Ford.[3]

    [edit] SourcesPaul G Hoffman Papers 1928-72 Truman Library & Museum
    [edit] References^ Longstreet, Stephen. A Century on Wheels: The Story of Studebaker. New York: Henry Holt and Company. pp. 121. 1st edn., 1952.
    ^ Biography at United Nations
    ^ Statement by Gerald Ford on Hoffman’s death 8 October 1974
    [edit] Further reading Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Paul G. Hoffman
    The Paul G. Hoffman Page at smokershistory.com
    A film clip “Longines Chronoscope with Paul G. Hoffman” is available for free download at the Internet Archive [more]
    A film clip “Longines Chronoscope with Paul G. Hoffman (July 30, 1951)” is available for free download at the Internet Archive [more]

    Diplomatic posts
    Preceded by
    Founding of the UNDP Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme
    1966–1972 Succeeded by
    Rudolph A. Peterson

    http://drkatesview.wordpress.com/2010/02/19/education-and-the-new-world-order/

  4. Renee says:

    From above again
    ***NOTE***
    Both in its design and in its choice of programs Ford bore the marks of its founding era. The post-war anxiety over the maintenance of world peace and the precariousness of democracy throughout the world gave Ford a more strongly international emphasis than any of the major American foundations since established has had.6 Under Paul Hoffman’s initial leadership, its international programs sprang up quickly to levels that soon made the international vice-president, Don Price, feel uncomfortable at claiming too much of the budget. Ford also came at a time when the Federal government had learned to give major support to the sciences, and, within the philanthropic world, it was conscious of Rockefeller’s major commitment to health and medicine. Hughes and Gates and others now see their way to major investments in the health field; Ford’s planners thought they had to look elsewhere; a field that could have easily absorbed a large part of its resources looked pre-empted. Along with its commitment to promoting peace where it found plenty to do, Ford also set out to strength democratic institutions, promote economic growth and better understanding of human behavior. These were objectives that did not readily translate into major programs absorbing large chunks of Ford’s wealth. Education, on the other hand, was both prominent in Ford’s declared interests as laid down by Rowan Gaither’s famous Study Group, and it was a field that could readily use huge (and in the McCarthy era, blessedly non�controversial) expenditures. Under the confident initial guidance of Robert Maynard Hutchins, Ford’s educational commitments quickly became the principal competitor to to its international ones.

    ***Rowan Gaither’s famous Study Group***

  5. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._Rowan_Gaither
    Horace Rowan Gaither, Jr. (1909 – April 7, 1961) [1], known as H. Rowan Gaither, was a San Francisco attorney, investment banker, and a powerful administrator at the Ford Foundation. During World War II, he served as assistant director of the Radiation Laboratory at M.I.T. In 1948, he helped found the Rand Corporation and served as a trustee until 1959.[2][3] From 1959 through his death, Gaither was a general partner and co-founder of Draper, Gaither & Anderson, one of the first venture capital firms on the west coast of the U.S., together with William H. Draper, Jr., a retired Army general and Frederick L. Anderson, a retired Air Force general.

    He was hired by Henry Ford II to help set the priorities of the Ford Foundation in 1947, chairing the study committee that wrote the “Report of the Study for the Ford Foundation on Policy and Program.”[4] He was later president of the Ford Foundation. He is best remembered today as the author of the controversial 1957 Gaither Report on the vulnerability of American defense. He died in 1961 of lung cancer.[5]

    [edit] References^ Although many sources have erroneously listed Gaither’s date of death as April 13, Gaither’s passing was reported by the Associated Press on April 8th, the day after he died, e.g. “Rowan Gaither, Jr., Author of Critical Report, Dead At 51”, Lewiston (ID) Morning Tribune, April 8, 1961, p1
    ^ http://www.rand.org/about/history/
    ^ http://www.rand.org/about/annual_report/1996/admin/trustees.html
    ^ http://www.fordfound.org/elibrary/documents/0113/toc.cfm
    ^ http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,872298,00.html
    [hide]v · t · e Private equity and venture capital investors

    Investment strategy Buyout · Venture · Growth · Mezzanine · Secondaries

    History History of private equity and venture capital · Early history of private equity · Private equity in the 1980s · Private equity in the 1990s · Private equity in the 2000s

    Investor types Private equity investors · Venture capitalists · Corporate raiders

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draper,_Gaither_%26_Anderson
    Draper, Gaither & Anderson (DGA) was one of the first venture capital firms founded in the western United States. The firm was founded in 1959 in Palo Alto, California by pioneering venture capitalist William H. Draper, Jr. Draper was joined by Rand Corporation founder Rowan Gaither as well as Frederick L. Anderson, Jr., a retired Air Force general.

    Prior to DGA, venture capital in the United States was located primarily on the east coast.[1]

    DGA was the first venture capital firm known to have used the current format for creating limited partnerships to serve as venture capital funds.[1] The fund’s holdings were distributed profitably to its various investors at the end of 1966.

    [edit] References^ a b Social sciences and innovation. 2001
    [edit] See alsoWilliam Henry Draper, Jr.
    Horace Rowan Gaither
    Draper Richards, a venture capital firm founded by William Henry Draper III
    Draper Fisher Jurvetson, a venture capital firm founded by Timothy C. Draper
    [edit] External linksDraper Richards History (company website)

    *Note spelling change on surname trick*
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timothy_Geithner

  6. Renee says:

    G Ben Thompson – Rose speaks http://www.rosespeaks.com/tag/g-ben-thompson/
    Nice to know poor Ford is still hollering he is the victim. Wonder what the patriarch, G. Ben Thompson, thinks of Ford Shelley taking down some of the Thompson …

    *NOTE*** Geithner Ben Thompson
    ***NOTE*** Smith
    **NOTE** Marshall, Pierce Bohannon**

    http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com/2010/08/25/1653990/mb-developer-testifies-in-anna.html
    LOS ANGELES — A man who had an affair with Anna Nicole Smith in the last year of her life testified Tuesday that she became groggy when she took medications, some of which were given to her by a defendant in the drug conspiracy case.
    G. Ben Thompson, a Myrtle Beach area developer, said he began a romantic relationship with the former Playboy model when she visited his Myrtle Beach home in summer 2005. He said she stayed in his room while Howard K. Stern, her lawyer and sometimes boyfriend, stayed in the guest room.
    Thompson, 63, remembered seeing Stern bring Smith pills twice. After she swallowed them, her behavior changed, he said. “She would become all groggy and like in la-la land,” Thompson said. “She didn’t have all her faculties.” according to Myrtle Beach jail records. Stern, Dr. Khristine Eroshevich and Dr. Sandeep Kapoor have pleaded not guilty to conspiring to provide Smith with massive doses of opiates and sedatives. They are not accused of causing her 2007 overdose death.

    Read more here: http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com/2010/08/25/1653990/mb-developer-testifies-in-anna.html#storylink=cpy

  7. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_California,_Davis
    http://www.freebornhall.com/History/Namesake/
    Mary Chase
    Freeborn

    “… chief in her thoughts was
    the welfare of the women
    of the University …”
    “A graduate of the University in 1912, Mary Chase Freeborn chose as her major the field of Natural Sciences. She was one of the charter members of the Prytanean Alumnae Association, which established Ritter Hall, a cooperative house for women. Mrs. Freeborn aided in founding a women’s infirmary, and her sincere interest always was in the welfare of the women of the University. Her appearance was striking, with her golden hair and brown eyes belying an inner strength when she believed a cause was right… a vibrant combination of gracious cooperation and deep inner conviction. In both community and University affairs, her charm and personality were well-known and loved. Despite a full, active life, she was a devoted mother and homemaker with two children, and shared enthusiastically in the life of her husband, Stanley B. Freeborn, who later became chancellor emeritus of the Davis campus.
    MARY CHASE FREEBORN
    born 20 May 1889 in Georgia
    d/o Mr. CHASE and Miss FOOTE
    died 13 Jan 1946 in Alameda County, CA

    married Stanley Barron FREEBORN
    born 11 Dec 1891 in Massachusetts
    s/o Mr. FREEBORN and Miss KING
    died 17 July 1960 in Yolo County, CA

    they were the parents of
    Stanley Barron FREEBORN Jr. (1918-1993)
    and Joyce Freeborn JENSEN (1925-1997)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JPMorgan_Chase

  8. Renee says:

    http://www.godolphin.com/FacilitiesDetail.aspx?id=5037
    GODOLPHIN STABLES – NEWMARKET

    The historic Godolphin Stables in Newmarket

    © http://www.godolphin.com

    On the way to Snailwell Gallop for morning exercise

    © http://www.godolphin.com

    The equine swimming pool is just one of the facilities available at Godolphin Stables

    © http://www.godolphin.com

    The turn-out pens are in full use throughout the summer months

    © http://www.godolphin.com
    Saeed bin Suroor has trained at Godolphin Stables in Newmarket, England, during the spring and summer each year since transferring from nearby Moulton Paddocks in 2004.

    Godolphin horses based there have gained plenty of important victories, with the brilliant Shamardal, fellow Classic winner Dubawi, Rio De La Plata, Ibn Khaldun, Creachadoir, Cherry Mix, Punctilious, Librettist, Ramonti and the 2009 St Leger hero Mastery among the Group One victors.

    Godolphin Stables’ horses arrive in Newmarket in April after enjoying the benefits of Dubai’s pleasant winter climate at Al Quoz Stables, Saeed bin Suroor’s home base.

    Horses from the 115-box Newmarket yard utilise Godolphin’s private Snailwell Gallops, which feature both turf and Tapeta surfaces.

    Godolphin Stables, located between Snailwell Road and Bury Road, is also convenient for the Long Hill and Limekilns gallops.

    Formerly known as Stanley House Stables, Godolphin Stables has an illustrious history.

    Frederick Stanley, the 16th Earl of Derby, constructed the original complex in 1903 and installed his trainer, the Honourable George Lambton.

    The trainer was responsible for 14 English Classic winners during his time at Stanley House Stables, such as the brilliant 1933 Derby winner Hyperion, owned by Edward Stanley, the 17th Earl of Derby.

    For four years from 1926, Frank Butters punctuated George Lambton’s two spells at Stanley House, sending out the champion Fairway and the top-class Colorado for the 17th Earl.

    Following George Lambton’s departure for a second and final time at the end of 1933, Colledge Leader took over at Stanley House Stables and enjoyed Classic successes with Oaks winner Quashed and 1,000 Guineas heroine Tideway.

    Walter Earl, who became responsible for the yard in 1939, saddled six war-time Classic winners in the 1940s, among them the Derby victor Watling Street, as well as the brilliant stayer Alycidon.

    During World War II, Lord Derby opened up part of Stanley House as a home for orphaned boys who had been evacuated from London and other cities.

    The 17th Earl of Derby passed away in 1948 and his son, the 18th Earl, did not possess the same passion for horseracing. Stanley House was eventually sold to trainer Gavin Pritchard-Gordon in 1976.

    H. H. Sheikh Mohammed purchased Stanley House Stables in the 1980s and installed John Gosden as the trainer there in 1988. They enjoyed Classic success with Shantou in the 1996 St Leger at Doncaster, while the trainer also saddled Benny The Dip to win the 1997 Derby.

    John Gosden left Stanley House Stables in 1999 to go to Manton and, in 2001, David Loder began training Godolphin’s two-year-olds at the yard. That arrangement lasted until David Loder’s retirement in 2003 and the following year the yard was renamed Godolphin Stables prior to the arrival of Saeed bin Suroor and the Godolphin string.

    Godolphin Stables, like Moulton Paddocks, is a modern training yard with swimming pool, spa, private training tracks, turn-out pens/paddocks, indoor schools, veterinary facilities, farrier rooms and laundry facilities.

  9. Renee says:

    G Ben Thompson

    Geither Ben THOMPSON

  10. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reed_Elsevier
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LexisNexis

    Defend Our Freedoms From the Absense of Privacy: Datamining v … defendourfreedoms.net/2012/10/16/datamining-v-the-senate.aspx
    Oct 16, 2012 … Mark Ndesandjo (1) … Reed Elsevier, the company that owns Lexis-Nexis, and Experian were among the biggest spenders in the group, laying …

    http://defendourfreedoms.net/2012/03/30/lexisnexis-may-have-willfully-mishandled-background-checks.aspx

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crispin_Davis
    Sir Crispin Davis, OBE (born 1949, England), is the Chairman and Director of StarBev Netherlands BV. He was previously chairman of the board and the chief executive officer of Reed Elsevier Group PLC, and he is a non-executive director of GlaxoSmithKline PLC.[1] Sir Crispin has also served as the chief executive officer of Aegis Group PLC from 1994 until 1999. He was a board member at Guinness PLC, and the group managing director of United Distillers from 1990 to 1993. For twenty years, he served at Procter and Gamble, in senior positions in the United Kingdom, Germany, and North America.

    Davis earned a bachelor’s degree from Oriel College at Oxford University. He was knighted by Queen Elizabeth in 2004 for services to the information industry[2]. Davis and his wife, Anne, have three daughters.

    He is the brother of former McKinsey & Company managing director Ian Davis.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GlaxoSmithKline

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guinness

  11. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ian_Davis
    Ian Davis (born 1952) was a longtime top senior partner and director at management consultancy McKinsey & Company, serving as managing director (chief executive) from 2003 to 2009. He succeeded Rajat Gupta on July 1, 2003. He joined McKinsey in 1979, retired in 2010 and currently serves as a senior partner emeritus.

    Davis was born in Kent, UK. Prior to becoming managing director, he was office manager of McKinsey’s London and UK office. He has an undergraduate degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics from Balliol College, Oxford University.[1] He is a member of the board of BP.

    He is the brother of Reed Elsevier chairman Crispin Davis.[2]

    From Davis’s bio: Mr Davis is a Non-Executive Director at Johnson & Johnson Inc, BP plc, Teach For All Inc, Big Society Trust and Majid Al Futtaim Holdings LLC. He is a Senior Adviser to Apax Partners LLP, a Non-Executive Board Member at the UK Cabinet Office and an Advisory Director of King Abdullah Petroleum Studies and Research Centre.

    [edit] MembershipsNon-executive Director BP plc since 2 April 2010[3]
    Independent Non-Executive Director Johnson & Johnson Inc
    Non-Executive Director Majid Al Futtaim Holdings LLC
    Non-Executive Director Teach For All Inc
    Non-Executive Director Big Society Trust
    Non-Executive Member of UK Cabinet Office
    Senior Adviser to McKinsey & Company
    Senior Adviser to Apax LLP
    Advisory Director to King Abdullah Petroleum Study and Research Centre
    International Business Council of the World Economic Forum
    Conference Board, member Board of Trustees
    Cambridge Judge Business School, University of Cambridge, Advisory Board member
    City of Beijing, Advisory Board member
    [edit] References^ http://www.mckinsey.com/ideas/wef2004/biographies/ian.asp
    ^ The Might of the McKinsey Mob
    ^ BP Board Profile
    Ian Davis
    Born 1952
    Kent, United Kingdom
    Ethnicity British
    Citizenship United Kingdom
    Alma mater Balliol College, Oxford University
    Occupation Consultant, Management expert
    Years active 1979-2010
    Employer McKinsey & Company, Inc.
    Salary $ 5 – 10 million + (estimate)
    Net worth $ 50 – 100 million + (estimate)
    Title Senior Partner Emeritus
    Term 2003-2009 (Managing director)
    Predecessor Rajat Gupta
    Successor Dominic Barton

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BP_plc

  12. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rajat_Gupta
    Rajat Kumar Gupta (RA-jat ku-MAAR GUP-ta; Bengali: রজত গুপ্ত; born 2 December 1948) is an Indian American businessman who was the managing director (chief executive) of management consultancy McKinsey & Company from 1994 to 2003 and a business leader in India and the United States. He was convicted in June 2012 on insider trading charges stemming from the Raj Rajaratnam-led Galleon Group case on four criminal felony counts of conspiracy and securities fraud. He was sentenced in October 2012 to two years in prison, an additional year on supervised release and ordered to pay $5 million in fines.[3]

    In his capacity at McKinsey, Gupta was recognized as the first Indian-born CEO of a global Western company. After becoming a senior partner emeritus at McKinsey, Gupta served as corporate chairman, board director or strategic advisor to a variety of large and notable organizations: corporations including Goldman Sachs, Procter and Gamble and American Airlines, and non-profits including The Gates Foundation, The Global Fund and the International Chamber of Commerce.

    Rajat Gupta is additionally the co-founder of four different organizations: the Indian School of Business with Anil Kumar, the American India Foundation with Victor Menezes and Lata Krishnan, New Silk Route with Parag Saxena and Victor Menezes, and Scandent with Ramesh Vangal.

    Contents [show]
    1 Early life and education
    2 Career
    2.1 McKinsey & Company
    2.2 Outside McKinsey & Company
    3 Philanthropy
    4 Insider trading conviction
    5 Personal life
    6 See also
    7 References
    8 External links

    [edit] Early life and educationRajat Gupta was born in Kolkata, India to Pran Kumari Gupta and Ashwini Kumar Gupta. His father was a journalist for Ananda Publishers. His father was a prominent freedom fighter and had been jailed by the British for his efforts. His mother taught at a Montessori school. Gupta has three siblings.

    When Gupta was five the family moved to New Delhi, where his father went to start the newspaper Hindustan Standard. Gupta’s father died when Gupta was sixteen; Gupta’s mother died two years later. Now an orphan, Gupta and his siblings “decided to live by ourselves. It was pretty unusual in those days.”[4]

    He was a student at Modern School in New Delhi. After high school, Gupta ranked 15th in the nation in the entrance exam for the Indian Institutes of Technology, IIT JEE. He received a Bachelor of Technology degree in Mechanical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi (IIT-Delhi) in 1971. Declining a job from the prestigious domestic firm ITC Limited, he received an MBA from Harvard Business School (HBS) in 1973, where he was named a Baker Scholar.[5] Gupta remarked that the first time he saw an airplane was when he flew to ITC to inform them he would be attending HBS.[4]

    [edit] Career[edit] McKinsey & CompanyGupta joined McKinsey & Company in 1973 as one of the earliest Indian-Americans at the consultancy. He was initially rejected because of inadequate work experience, a decision that was overturned after his Harvard Business School professor Walter J. Salmon called Ron Daniel, then head of the New York office and later also the managing director of McKinsey, on Gupta’s behalf.[4]

    Gupta began his career in New York before moving to Scandinavia to become the head of McKinsey offices in 1981. He did well in what was then considered a “backwater” area; this is where he first made his mark.[6] Elected senior partner in 1984, he became head of the Chicago office in 1990. In 1994 he was elected the firm’s first managing director (chief executive) born outside of the US, and re-elected twice in 1997 and 2000. In this capacity, he was considered the first Indian-born CEO of a multinational organization.

    Gupta’s mentors at McKinsey included Ron Daniel, the former managing director who as senior partner first hired Gupta into the New York office, and Anupam (Tino) Puri, the first Indian at the Firm and eventual senior partner.[4] He, in turn, mentored Anil Kumar as another early Indian-American at the consultancy. Gupta and Kumar “were the face of McKinsey in India.”[7] According to The Financial Times, “the two operated as a forceful double-act to secure business for McKinsey, win access in Washington and build a brotherhood of donors around the Hyderabad-based ISB and a handful of social initiatives.” [7]

    During Gupta’s time as head of McKinsey, the firm opened offices in 23 new countries and doubled its consultant base.[8] His successor Ian Davis was elected by “emphasizing the need for a return to the McKinsey heritage”.[9] This was seen as a reaction against Gupta’s aggressive firm expansion. It was also a time of perceived shifting of standards. Enron, closely identified with McKinsey, collapsed during Gupta’s tenure. During the dot-com bubble he and Anil Kumar created a program for McKinsey to accept payment from its clients in stock. Gupta’s accountability for the shifting of standards was weighed differently by different observers.[10]

    After completing three full terms (the maximum allowed, by a rule he had himself initiated) and nearly a decade as head of the firm, Gupta became senior partner again in 2003 and senior partner emeritus in 2007.[11] Gupta is widely regarded as one of the first Indians to successfully break through the glass ceiling, as the first Indian-born CEO of a multinational corporation (not just a consultancy).[4]

    Gupta maintained an office, executive assistant, email and phone at McKinsey and Company after 2007,[12] and maintains the title “senior partner emeritus” of the firm.[13] He also continued to receive a salary from McKinsey as senior partner emeritus, totaling $6 million in 2008 and $2.5 million for each of the following three years.[14] However, in the wake of subsequent scandals a McKinsey spokesperson was quoted as saying, “Our firm no longer has a professional relationship with Rajat Gupta.”[15] According to NDTV, “sources tell us that the firm dropped Mr Gupta from its alumni database, and called clients worldwide to say that they would have nothing to do with him going forward.” The manner in which the firm severed ties with its former head attracted some controversy.[16]

    [edit] Outside McKinsey & CompanyIn 1997 Gupta co-founded the Indian School of Business (ISB) with friend and fellow senior partner Anil Kumar. The school was ranked number 13 in the world by The Financial Times in its “Global MBA Rankings 2011”.[17] Gupta and Kumar have both since resigned as chairman and executive board director respectively.[18][19]

    Before stepping down as managing director he co-founded Scandent Solutions with Ramesh Vangal and the American India Foundation with Victor Menezes and Lata Krishnan. After McKinsey Gupta co-founded and chaired the private equity firm New Silk Route, formerly named Taj Capital Partners, with Parag Saxena and Victor Menezes.

    Gupta has served on many corporate boards during his career. He became a member of the board of Procter & Gamble in 2007, and held that post until March of 2011.[20] He was also a member of the board of investment firm Goldman Sachs from 2006 until the expiration of his term in 2010.[21] Gupta was also the non-executive chairman of Genpact from 2007 until March 2011. He also served on the board of AMR, the parent company of American Airlines, from 2008 until 2011, and on the board of Harman International from 2009 to 2011.[22] Gupta has also served on the board of Russian bank Sberbank, and as a managing advisor to Symphony Technology Group.[23]

    Gupta has also served as a director of various financial groups. In addition to his work at Goldman Sachs, Gupta served as an advisory partner with Fjord Capital Parners[24] and as chairman of the advisory board for Clutch Group. Gupta was also a member of the advisory board for OmniCapital Group

    • Renee says:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anil_Kumar

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denny_Chin
      Denny Chin (Chinese: 陳卓光) is a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. He was a judge on the United States district court for the Southern District of New York before joining the federal appeals bench. President Clinton nominated Chin to the district court on March 24, 1994, and Chin was confirmed August 9 of that same year. On October 6, 2009, President Barack Obama nominated Chin to the federal appeals court. He was confirmed on April 22, 2010 by the U.S. Senate, filling the vacancy created by Judge Robert D. Sack who assumed senior status.[1][2][3] Chin was the first Asian American appointed as a U.S. District Judge outside of the Ninth Circuit.

      Contents [show]
      1 Early life, education, and career
      2 As district judge
      2.1 Notable cases
      2.2 U.S. v. Madoff
      3 As circuit judge
      4 References
      5 External links

      [edit] Early life, education, and careerChin was born in 1954 in Kowloon, Hong Kong and came to the U.S. in 1956. He graduated from Stuyvesant High School in 1971.[4] He received his A.B. magna cum laude, from Princeton University in 1975. In 1978, Chin graduated from Fordham University School of Law, where he was the Managing Editor of the Fordham Law Review. Chin currently teaches first year Legal Writing at Fordham.

      Following a 1978-1980 clerkship with Judge Henry Werker in the Southern District, Chin worked for the law firm of Davis Polk & Wardwell from 1980 to 1982.[5] He was an Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District from 1982 to 1986.[6] In 1986, Chin left the U.S. Attorney’s Office and started a law firm, Campbell, Patrick & Chin, with two colleagues from the U.S. Attorney’s Office. In 1990, he joined the law firm Vladeck, Waldman, Elias & Engelhard, P.C., where he specialized in labor and employment law and represented employees and unions.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Davis_Polk_%26_Wardwell
      Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP is an international law firm, employing nearly 800 attorneys worldwide, with its headquarters in New York City. Consistently ranked as one of the most prestigious in the world, the firm represents many of the world’s largest companies and financial institutions, and is best known for its corporate and litigation practices.[3][4] Chambers Associate called Davis Polk the “Tiffany’s of law firms”.[4]

      Contents [show]
      1 History
      2 Davis Polk alumni in public service
      2.1 Judiciary
      2.2 Elected office
      2.3 Law enforcement and financial regulation
      2.4 Other government service
      3 Other alumni
      3.1 Business
      3.2 Media and entertainment
      3.3 Academia
      4 Recognitions
      5 Offices
      5.1 North America
      5.2 Europe
      5.3 Asia
      5.4 South America
      6 See also
      7 References
      8 External links

      [edit] HistoryThe firm traces its origins to Gunthrie, Bangs & Van Sinderen, founded in 1849 by Francis S. Bangs, an opponent of Tammany Hall.[5] The firm changed its name several times to account for new partners, using names such as Bangs, Stetson, Tracy, and McVeigh and Stetson, Jennings & Russell. Among other high-profile lawyers, Grover Cleveland served as a member of the firm during the interval between his two non-consecutive presidential terms.[6] Davis Polk was located at 15 Broad Street from around 1889 until 1959.

      The firm takes its current name from three 20th century partners: John W. Davis, Frank Polk, and Allen Wardwell. Davis, a former U.S. Solicitor General and the 1924 Democratic presidential nominee, made 139 oral arguments before the United States Supreme Court, most infamously in Brown v. Board of Education, in which he represented South Carolina in defense of racial segregation. With Polk and Wardwell, Davis developed close ties between the firm and the J.P. Morgan companies, as well as the Guaranty Trust Company, the Associated Press, and International Paper. (These ties were long standing, going back to Stetson himself.)

      The firm has represented numerous clients in the ongoing financial crisis, with roles in the AIG, Freddie Mac, Lehman Brothers, and Citigroup matters.[7] It has also served as lead counsel to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York in the U.S. Treasury’s $250 billion bank capital purchase program and the creation of the Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility.[8] To bolster its financial regulatory practice, the firm recently hired three former Securities and Exchange Commission officials—Commissioner Annette Nazareth, Director of Enforcement Linda Chatman Thomsen, and Deputy Director of Trading and Markets Robert Colby—as well as former White House Staff Secretary Raul Yanes and former FDIC General Counsel John Douglas.
      Headquarters 450 Lexington Avenue
      New York City
      No. of offices 10 (2012)
      No. of attorneys 774 (2012)
      Major practice areas Capital Markets, Corporate/M&A, Financial Services Regulation, Investment Management, Private Equity, Litigation, Insolvency/Restructuring, Antitrust, Credit and Tax, among others.[1]
      Key people Thomas J. Reid Managing Partner
      Revenue $910 million (2011)[2]
      Date founded 1849
      Company type LLP

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_J._Reid

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Reid

  13. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McKinsey_%26_Company
    McKinsey & Company, Inc. is an American global management consulting firm that focuses on solving issues of concern to senior management. McKinsey serves as an adviser to many businesses, governments, and institutions. It is widely recognized as the most prestigious consulting firm in the world,[3][4][5]has proportionally produced more CEOs in large-scale corporations than any other company,[6] and has been a top employer for new MBA graduates since 1996.[7]

    Contents [show]
    1 History
    1.1 1920s and 1930s
    1.2 1940s and 1950s
    1.3 1960 – 1990
    1.4 1990s
    1.5 2000 onward
    2 Organization and administration
    2.1 Office locations
    3 Recruiting
    4 Compensation
    5 Competitors
    6 Publishing
    7 Knowledge management system
    8 Asset management
    9 Notable alumni
    10 Criticism
    11 Galleon insider trading scandal
    12 References
    13 External links

    [edit] History[edit] 1920s and 1930sMcKinsey & Company was founded in 1926 in Chicago by James McKinsey under the name James O. McKinsey & Company.[8][9] Previously, James McKinsey served as an accounting professor at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and is considered the father of managerial accounting.[10] Advocates for the concepts introduced in McKinsey’s book, Budgetary Control, were among McKinsey’s first clients.[10][11] The book founded the practice of managerial accounting.[10]

    Mr. McKinsey hired Tom Kearney and Marvin Bower in the early 1930s.[8][12] In 1935,[13] In 1935, Marshall Field’s became a client and in 1935 convinced McKinsey to leave the firm to accept a temporary position and become its Chairman and CEO, in order to help the company through a restructuring.[11][14] After McKinsey left, the remaining members of the firm agreed to merge with the accounting firm Scovell, Wellington & Company in 1935, leading to the creation of McKinsey, Wellington & Co.[13]

    In 1937 James O. McKinsey died unexpectedly of pneumonia, which led to the division of McKinsey, Wellington & Company in 1939. C. Oliver Wellington returned to manage Scovell, Wellington & Company full-time and took the accounting practice with him. The management engineering practice was split into two affiliated firms: McKinsey & Company and McKinsey, Kearney & Company. McKinsey & Company was led by Guy Crockett, Dick Fletcher, and Marvin Bower.[citation needed] Guy Crockett became Managing Partner of McKinsey & Company, running day-to-day operations, while Marvin Bower handled conceptual and long-term strategy as Crockett’s deputy.[13] Bower would lead the company for 30 years with a focus on being “professional” in looks, tone, and conduct.[15]

    McKinsey & Company is credited with creating modern management consulting as a professional service.[13][16] Marvin Bower is credited with shaping the firm’s values and principles.[17] Bower’s idea was to create a management consulting firm working with senior executives with the same professional standards he had witnessed as a lawyer for the firm of Jones Day Reavis & Pogue,[18] in Cleveland.[11]

    In New York, Bower established the firm’s core principles in a 1937 memo.[13][19] According to Fortune Magazine:

    “A McKinsey consultant is supposed to put the interests of his client ahead of increasing The Firm’s revenues; he should keep his mouth shut about his client’s affairs; he should tell the truth and not be afraid to challenge a client’s opinion; and he should only agree to perform work that he feels is both necessary and something McKinsey can do well. Along with the professional code, Bower insisted on professional, as opposed to business, language, which is why McKinsey is always The Firm, never the company; jobs are engagements; and The Firm has a practice, not a business.”[11]

    [edit] 1940s and 1950sIn the early 1940s, Bower placed more emphasis on persuading clients to accept and act on its recommendations. In 1945 the firm established a New Engagement and Executive Relations Guide.[13]

    In 1950 Guy Crockett stepped down as managing director and Bower served as the firm’s managing director until 1967. The firm’s profit-sharing, executive and planning committees were formed in 1951.[13] In 1953 McKinsey began hiring consultants straight out of business school. Bower decided to hire and train primarily young graduates at a time when most consultants were mature executives and experienced professionals.[19] The postwar period was a time of expansion for McKinsey and the economy in general. McKinsey’s client base grew to include several bluechip, defense contractors, government, and military organizations.[17]

    The “up or out” philosophy, which says that consultants should find a role outside of the firm if they are not advancing, was first implemented in 1954[citation needed] after years of internal consensus building. The move was internally controversial. The McKinsey ownership plan was adopted to improve incentives in 1956 and more guidelines were formalized on profit sharing, promotions, and elections. After seven years of deliberation, McKinsey turned itself into a private corporation with shares exclusive to McKinsey employees. McKinsey’s planning committee developed a plan for international expansion and established an office in London in 1959.[13] By 1952 McKinsey & Company formally parted ways with McKinsey, Kearney & Company, which was renamed A.T. Kearney & Company.

  14. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A.T._Kearney
    A.T. Kearney is a global management consulting firm, focusing on strategic and operational CEO-agenda issues for the world’s leading organizations across all major industries and sectors. It was founded in 1926, and its head office is in Chicago, Illinois. The firm is regularly ranked in Consulting Magazine’s annual list of the “Best Firms to Work For”[1][2] and among the Top 10 in the Vault Consulting 50 rankings.[3]

    Contents [show]
    1 Practice areas
    2 Offices
    3 Competitors
    4 History
    4.1 1926–1987
    4.2 1987–1994
    4.3 1995–2005
    4.4 Since 2006
    5 Global Business Policy Council
    6 Notable current and former employees
    7 Publications
    8 References
    9 External links

    [edit] Practice areasA.T. Kearney’s industry specialties include aerospace and defense, automotive, communications, consumer and retail, financial institutions, public sector, high technology, pharmaceuticals, health care, energy, and utilities. Major service lines are in supply chain management, strategy, mergers, innovation, complexity, capital projects, cost management, strategic IT, transformation, manufacturing, marketing and sales, procurement, and sustainability.

    [edit] OfficesCurrently, the firm runs 57 offices in 39 countries. The firm opened its first international office in Düsseldorf, Germany, in 1964.

    Americas [11 offices]
    Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Detroit, Mexico City, New York, San Francisco, São Paulo, Toronto, Washington, D.C.
    Asia Pacific [13 offices]
    Bangkok, Beijing, Hong Kong, Jakarta, Kuala Lumpur, Melbourne, Mumbai, New Delhi, Seoul, Shanghai, Singapore, Sydney, Tokyo
    Europe [27 offices]
    Amsterdam, Berlin, Brussels, Bucharest, Budapest, Copenhagen, Düsseldorf, Frankfurt, Helsinki, Istanbul, Kiev, Lisbon, Ljubljana, London, Madrid, Milan, Moscow, Munich, Oslo, Paris, Prague, Rome, Stockholm, Stuttgart, Vienna, Warsaw, Zurich
    Middle East and Africa [5 offices]
    Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Johannesburg, Manama, Riyadh
    [edit] CompetitorsA.T. Kearney’s top competitors include white shoe firms McKinsey & Company, Bain & Company, the Boston Consulting Group, Booz & Company, L.E.K. Consulting, Roland Berger Strategy Consultants, and Monitor Group.

    [edit] History[edit] 1926–1987A.T. Kearney began as a branch of McKinsey & Company. Andrew Thomas Kearney joined James O. McKinsey’s firm 3 years after it was founded in 1926. Tom Kearney was McKinsey’s first partner and head of its first office in Chicago. At the time, McKinsey & Company was one of the only firms that focused on management consulting for top level executives rather than specialized consulting in areas such as accounting or law.

    In 1937 James O. McKinsey died unexpectedly at the age of 48 due to pneumonia. While the company continued to operate as before, Tom Kearney and the remaining partners disagreed over how to run the firm. In 1939 the company split; A.T. Kearney continued to operate the Chicago office, renaming the firm McKinsey and Kearney. Marvin Bower, the head of the New York office, continued the practice in New York and retained the rights to the name McKinsey & Company in all areas other than the Midwest. In 1947 Bower purchased the exclusive rights to the name McKinsey & Company from Tom Kearney, who renamed his firm A.T. Kearney & Associates.

    Important Events during this period are:

    1926 – McKinsey is established
    1929 – Andrew Thomas Kearney joins McKinsey
    1935 – Tom Kearney becomes managing partner
    1939 – The firm splits in two: McKinsey & Co. moves to New York and Boston, and McKinsey, Kearney & Co. remains in Chicago
    1945 – Tom Kearney asked by President Franklin Roosevelt to head mission to help the Chinese improve their defense readiness efforts. Kearney received a U.S. Medal of Freedom and a Victory Medal from the Chinese government
    1946 – Firm adopts the name A.T. Kearney & Company
    1962 – Tom Kearney dies January 11
    1963 – A.T. Kearney & Company, Inc., incorporated in April; A.T. Kearney International, Inc., incorporated in July as a subsidiary
    1964 – A.T. Kearney, G.m.b.H., established as first non‑U.S. office in Düsseldorf, led by Art Kelly
    1968 – Expansion continues with offices opened in San Francisco, New York, Milan, Paris, and London
    1972 – Firm’s name changed to A.T. Kearney, Inc.; First Asian office opens in Tokyo
    1980 – Offices open in Amsterdam, Stuttgart, Atlanta, Boston, and Dallas
    1985 – A.T. Kearney begins consulting work in China
    1986 – Joint ventures in China, Taiwan, and Tunisia signed
    [edit] 1987–19941988 – Biggest expansion in the history of the firm peaks with 20 of 26 offices enlarged, relocated or opened since late 1985; Offices open in Madrid and Munich
    1988 – Named fifth-largest broad-based multidisciplined management consultancy in the United States; Firm surpasses $100 million in revenue
    1989 – A.T. Kearney’s operation in West Germany celebrates 25th anniversary
    1989 – A.T. Kearney staff worldwide reaches 1,000 employees
    1990 – Office opens in Singapore
    1991 – Berlin office opens
    1992 – Three Nordic offices acquired in Copenhagen, Oslo and Stockholm; Offices open in Hong Kong and Prague
    1992 – Global Business Policy Council formed to provide a global strategic forum for corporate executives and policy leaders; New world headquarters completed in Chicago
    1993 – Firm marks 10th straight year of double-digit growth
    1994 – Wins two five-year contracts from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, largest in firm’s history
    1994 – Offices open in Helsinki, Mexico City, São Paulo, Sydney, Melbourne, and Silicon Valley
    [edit] 1995–2005In 1995, A.T. Kearney was acquired by EDS, a large technology consulting firm.[4]

    1995 – A.T. Kearney hires 2,000th employee
    1995 – A.T. Kearney becomes a wholly owned subsidiary of EDS in September, nearly doubling in size and vastly expanding its industry expertise and information technology capabilities
    1995 – Offices open in Beijing, Warsaw, and Seoul
    1996 – Moscow office expansion makes A.T. Kearney the multinational consultancy with the largest on‑site capability in Russia
    1996 – Offices open in Kuala Lumpur, Lisbon, and Rome
    1997 – First Global Prize, an annual business school case study competition for potential recruits, awarded
    1997 – Offices open in New Delhi, Shanghai, and Jakarta; Revenues top $1 billion
    1998 – Premiere issue of Executive Agenda, the firm’s thought-leadership journal, published; offices open in Vienna and Frankfurt
    2000 – Dietmar Ostermann named chief executive officer
    2002 – Consulting Magazine names Ben T. Smith IV to its list of Top 25 Most Influential Consultants
    2003 – Winning the Merger Endgame, by Fritz Kroeger and Graeme Deans, selected by Executive Book Summaries as one of the best business books of 2003
    2004 – Consulting Magazine names Fritz Kroeger to its list of Top 25 Most Influential Consultants
    2005 – A.T. Kearney officers elect a new board of directors
    2005 – Paul A. Laudicina, director of A.T. Kearney’s Global Business Policy Council, named to Consulting Magazine’s list of Top 25 Most Influential Consultants
    2005 – World Out of Balance, by Laudicina, selected by Executive Book Summaries as one of the best business books of 2005
    [edit] Since 2006In 2005, EDS CEO, Michael Jordan, confirmed rumors that EDS was seeking to sell A.T. Kearney back to its management team. The transaction was completed in January 2006.[5] More than 170 A.T. Kearney officers from 26 countries participated in the transaction as investors (90% of those invited to participate did so).

    2006 – A.T. Kearney completes management buyout from EDS and becomes an independent, privately owned firm
    2006 – A.T. Kearney celebrates its 80th anniversary
    2006 – Officers elect Paul Laudicina as managing officer and chairman of the board
    2006 – A.T. Kearney South Korea LLC becomes largest consulting presence in the country
    2006 – Offices open in Dubai and Ljubljana, Slovenia
    2007 – Office opens in Bucharest, Romania
    2007 – Paul Laudicina, managing officer and CEO, is named to Consulting Magazine’s list of Top 25 Most Influentical Consultants
    2008 – Daniel Mahler, partner from the New York office, named to Consulting Magazine’s list of Top 25 Most Influential Consultants
    2009 – Vance Scott, partner from the Chicago office, named to Consulting Magazine’s list of Top 25 Most Influential Consultants
    2010 – A.T. Kearney becomes carbon neutral across its global consulting operations, achieving a 2007 pledge to be carbon neutral by 2010.
    2010 – Hana Ben-Shabat, a NY-based partner, named to Consulting Magazine’s list of Top 25 Most Influential Consultants
    2011 – Laura Gurski, partner from the Chicago office, named to Consulting Magazine’s list of Top 25 Most Influential Consultants
    2011 – Office opens in Istanbul
    2012 – Firm starts 86th year with new look and focus on what makes it different.[6]
    2012 – Joe Raudabaugh, partner from the Chicago office, named to Consulting Magazine’s list of Top 25 Consultants[7]
    2012 – Firm is named to Consulting Magazine’s 2012 “Best Firms to Work For”[8]
    2012 – The partners of A.T. Kearney elected Johan Aurik, a Brussels-based partner, to a three-year term as Managing Partner and Chairman of the Board, effective January 1, 2013.[9]
    [edit] Global Business Policy CouncilA.T. Kearney’s Global Business Policy Council (GBPC) helps business and government leaders worldwide anticipate and plan for the future. In 1992, Paul A. Laudicina, A.T. Kearney’s current managing partner and chairman of the board, launched the Council and served as its first director. Today, the Council is led by Erik R. Peterson, who came to A.T. Kearney in 2010 from the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), where he served as senior vice president and held the CSIS William A. Schreyer Chair in Global Analysis. The core GBPC team is based in Washington, D.C. and draws on the expertise of a wide range of international experts.

    The GBPC offers business and government leaders three key services:

    Meetings that attract expertise and insight: As profiled in Forbes magazine,[10] the annual GBPC CEO Retreat convenes 55 leading executives and policy figures to discuss key global issues, best practices, and strategy
    Intellectual capital that helps leaders calibrate and plan for the future
    Global Services Location Index: analyzes and ranks the top 50 countries worldwide as the best destinations for providing outsourcing activities, including IT services and support, contact centers and back-office support[11]
    Foreign Direct Investment Confidence Index: demonstrates the “present and future prospects for international investment flows” via a survey of global executives, whose companies account for over $2 trillion in annual global revenue[12]
    Customized strategic advisory services, including scenario planning, location assessment, investment promotion, and global foresight
    [edit] Notable current and former employeesMatthew Le Merle – Chairman of the Advisory Board; and the Shanshan Group and the Yurun Group, two of China’s largest companies
    Antoine Rostand – President, Schlumberger Business Consulting
    Douglas Shulman – Commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service
    [edit] PublicationsAsian Mergers & Acquisitions: Riding the Wave – By Vikram Chakravarty and Soon Ghee Chua, Singapore: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., July 2012[13][14]
    Beating the Global Odds: Successful Decision-Making in a Confused and Troubled World – By Paul A. Laudicina, Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., October 2012
    [edit] References^ Consulting Magazine Best Firms to work for 2011
    ^ http://www.consultingmag.com/article/ART1059780?C=uORPDSG64Vt1CB6R
    ^ Vault Consulting 50 Rankings 2012
    ^ Dobrzynski, Judith H. (May 31, 1995). “E.D.S. Resumes Purchase Talks With Kearney”. The New York Times. http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=990CE6DC103FF932A05756C0A963958260.
    ^ A.T. Kearney completes management buy-out from EDS
    ^ A.T. Kearney unveils new look, new focus
    ^ http://www.consultingmag.com/article/ART893171T
    ^ http://www.consultingmag.com/article/ART1059780?C=uORPDSG64Vt1CB6R
    ^ http://www.consultingmag.com/article/ART1061067?C=LccVK4lKF0QqUMEI
    ^ Ruiz, Rebecca (May 5, 2008). “How CEOs Stay On Top Of Their Game”. Forbes. http://www.forbes.com/2008/05/01/travel-retreat-executive-forbeslife-cx_rr_0429travel.html. Retrieved February 12, 2012.
    ^ “Global Services Location Index”. Global Business Policy Council. A.T. Kearney. http://www.atkearney.com/gbpc/global-services-location-index. Retrieved 5 September 2012.
    ^ “Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) Confidence Index®”. Global Business Policy Council. A.T. Kearney. http://www.atkearney.com/gbpc/foreign-direct-investment-confidence-index. Retrieved 5 September 2012.
    ^ Asian Mergers and Acquisitions: Riding the Wave [Wiley 2012]
    ^ Asian Companies Rewrite the Rules of M&A

    • Renee says:

      Aquired by EDS in 1995;
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_Data_Systems
      EDS was started in 1962 by H. Ross Perot.[1] Perot’s goal was to establish a company that offered high-end electronic data processing management personnel, along with the computer hardware, by targeting large corporations and by offering long-term contracts at a time when short-term contracts were the industry norm. The creation of Medicare in 1965 gave EDS an opportunity to enter government contracting, and by 1968 Medicare and Medicaid contracts provided about 25 percent of EDS revenues. By 1977, healthcare-claims processing accounted for nearly 40 percent of EDS revenues.

      In 1984, General Motors agreed to buy EDS for $2.5 billion. In 1996, GM spun off EDS again as an independent company, and then became one of its largest clients.

      On May 13, 2008, Hewlett-Packard Co. confirmed that it had reached a deal with Electronic Data Systems to acquire the company for $13.9 billion.[2] The deal was completed on August 26, 2008. EDS became an HP business unit and was temporarily renamed “EDS, an HP company”. Ronald A. Rittenmeyer, EDS Chairman, President, and CEO, remained at the helm and reported to HP CEO Mark Hurd until his retirement.[3]

      As of 2008, EDS employed 139,000 people in 64 countries, the largest locations being the United States, India and the UK. It was ranked as one of the largest service companies on the Fortune 500 list with around 2,000 clients.

      As of 23 September 2009, EDS began going to market as HP Enterprise Services, a name change which came one year after HP announced the acquisition of EDS, and which was a critical milestone as the integration of EDS into HP neared completion.[4]

      [edit] Company structure
      EDS headquarters in Plano, Texas.
      EDS in Tower 500 at the Renaissance Center in Detroit, MichiganIn 2006, EDS sold their management consulting subsidiary company, A.T. Kearney, in a management buyout and retained interests in five[citation needed] related companies:

      ExcellerateHRO, which offers Human resources outsourcing services jointly owned by Towers Perrin
      Injazat Data Systems, which is a joint venture between EDS and Mubadala Development Company of Abu Dhabi. Its purpose is to provide IT and business process outsourcing (BPO) services in the United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Oman to the government, oil and gas, utilities, financial services, transportation, telecom and healthcare sectors
      SOLCORP, which provides software solutions and consulting services for the life insurance and wealth management industry
      EDS Consumer Loan Services (a.k.a. Wendover), which supports consumer loans in the United States
      MphasiS, an HP Company, operating from Bangalore, India, is a leading applications development and business processing and infrastructure outsourcing company. MphasiS was merged with then EDS India Unit to become MphasiS, an HP Company with a total strength of 33000+ employees. MphasiS operates as an independent HP subsidiary with its own board and continues to be listed on Indian markets as MphasiS Limited.
      [edit] Recent acquisitions(List of earlier acquisitions: HP and EDS Acquisitions and Divestitures.)

      In May 2008, HP and EDS announced that they had signed a definitive agreement under which HP would purchase EDS at a price of $25.00 per share, or an enterprise value of approximately $13.9 billion. The terms of the transaction were unanimously approved by the HP and EDS boards of directors. The transaction closed on 26 August 2008. The companies’ collective services businesses, as of the end of each company’s 2007 fiscal year, had annual revenues of more than $38 billion and 210,000 employees, doing business in more than 80 countries.

      In November 2007, EDS announced that it had agreed to purchase an approximate 93 percent equity interest in Saber Corp., a leading provider of software and services to U.S. state governments, from various sellers, including majority shareholder Accel-KKR, for approximately $420 million in cash. Saber became Saber Government Solutions after merging with other EDS state and local non-healthcare groups. In January 2009, it rebranded as EDS, an HP company.

      In March 2007, EDS acquired RelQ Ltd, a testing company based in Bangalore, India.

      In June 2006, EDS acquired a majority holding in MphasiS, a leading applications and business process outsourcing (BPO) services company based in Bangalore, India.

      In April 2008, EDS acquired Vistorm Holdings Limited, a provider of information assurance and managed security services based in the U.K. The acquisition will create one of the largest information assurance and managed security services firms in Europe.[citation needed]

      In September 2009, HP purchased Lecroix Systems and incorporated it into the infrastructure of EDS to facilitate both in-house and client network security needs.

      [edit] Revenue sourcesFor 2006, $9.6 billion of revenue came from the Americas (Canada, Latin America, and the United States); $6.4 billion from Europe, Middle East, and Africa; $1.5 billion from Asia-Pacific;[citation needed] Services’ revenue was: Infrastructure $12 billion, Applications Software $5.9 billion, Business Process Outsourcing $3 billion and all other $421 million.

      EDS announced the expansion of its SAP consulting practice. “By collaborating with SAP on client engagement training and techniques that will drive the long-term growth of its consulting practice, EDS will further enhance its existing SAP capabilities and bring end-to-end SAP consulting and systems integration to the market by early 2008. Additionally, EDS will work closely with SAP’s Global Partner and Ecosystem Group for market penetration and value-added customer offerings.”

      [edit] Locations
      EDS campus in Plano, TexasEDS operated in 48 countries,[5] centered in the metropolitan areas of Dallas-Fort Worth; Detroit; Des Moines and Clarion, Iowa; Salt Lake City; Indianapolis; Winchester, Kentucky; Tulsa, Oklahoma; Boise, Idaho; and Northern Virginia in the United States. Other major facilities were in Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Egypt, Germany, Hungary, India, Israel, Italy, Mexico, New Zealand, South Africa, Spain and the United Kingdom.

      EDS’s Plano, Texas campus is located about 20 miles (30 km) north of downtown Dallas ( WikiMiniAtlas33°04′27″N 96°48′33″W / 33.0742°N 96.8093°W / 33.0742; -96.8093 (“EDS Plano Campus) ). The campus consists of 3,521,000 square feet (327,000 m²) of office and data center space on 270 acres (1.1 km²) of land. It is the center of the 2,665 acre (11 km²) Legacy in Plano[6] real estate development, which EDS built.

      [edit] Company sponsorshipsEDS sponsored the Premier League association football team Derby County from 1998 to 2001.

      EDS was the title sponsor of the PGA Tour’s EDS Byron Nelson Championship from 2003 to 2008, played in nearby Irving, Texas. In 2009, it became the HP Byron Nelson Championship. The tournament raises about $6 million dollars each year for youth and family service centers in Dallas, Texas.

      EDS signed a sponsorship agreement in 2007 with Nobel Media to become a Global Sponsor of the Nobel Prize Series, and with Nobel Web to become its Global Technology Services Partner. The three-year agreement enables EDS to apply its technology expertise for the benefit of the Nobel Prize Series and the organization’s Web technologies, including supporting the development of content on nobelprize.org, Nobel’s award-winning website.

      [edit] ServicesEDS catalogued its services into three service portfolios; Infrastructure, Applications, and Business Process Outsourcing.[7] Infrastructure services includes maintaining the operation of part or all of a client’s computer and communications infrastructure, such as networks, mainframes, “midrange” and Web servers, desktops and Laptops, and printers. Applications services involves the developing, integrating, and/or maintaining of applications software for clients. Business process outsourcing includes performing a business function for a client, like payroll, call centers, insurance claims processing, and so forth.

      [edit] PartnersEDS established a number of Business alliances[8] with other companies through its global alliance program. The company has three types of alliances: Agility Alliances, Solution Alliances and Technology Alliances.

      The EDS Agility Alliance has worked on a range of projects, notably its Agile Enterprise. Members of the EDS Agility Alliance include Cisco Systems, EMC Corporation, Microsoft, Oracle Corporation, SAP, Sun Microsystems, Symantec and Xerox.

      [edit] Major clientsMost of EDS’s clients were very large companies and governments that need services from a company of EDS’s scale. EDS’s largest clients included Rolls-Royce plc, General Motors, Bank of America, Arcandor, Kraft, United States Navy, the UK Ministry of Defence and Royal Dutch Shell.

      EDS formed the National Heritage Insurance Company in 1996. The creation of this subsidiary is to manage Medicare Part B services on behalf of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), formerly the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA). NHIC handles call center, claims processing and payment, fraud investigations, physician enrollment etc. in many states of the US.

      Another large EDS client is the United States Navy. In 2000, they won a contract for the creation of a US$9 billion Intranet linking the Navy and the Marine Corps, which was set to late 2006, but on March 24, 2006, was extended to 2010, adding $3 billion to the accumulated contract worth. This initiative is known as the Navy Marine Corps Intranet, or simply NMCI. In 2004, NMCI accounted for about 4% of EDS’s revenue. NMCI has been called the largest private network in the world, with approximately 400,000 “seats”. EDS provided the network, desktops, laptops, servers, telephones, video-conferencing, satellite transceivers, and overall management of the intranet.[9]

      Following on to the NMCI type of services, EDS in March 2005 won a US$4 billion contract with the UK Ministry of Defence[10] to “consolidate numerous existing information networks into a single next-generation infrastructure … The network will provide seamless interaction between headquarters, battlefield support and the front line, linking about 150,000 desktop terminals and 340,000 users in approximately 2,000 locations …”

      In February 2008 EDS signed a US$1.3 billion contract with the Infocomm Development Authority of Singapore, one of the largest IT projects ever undertaken in Asia. This agreement will help the Singapore government achieve a standard desktop, network and messaging/collaboration environment across its public sector by the end of fiscal year 2010.[11]

      In October 2008, the U.S. Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) signed a US$111 million contract with EDS. Under this contract, EDS will: conduct worldwide security reviews, deliver certification and accreditation support, provide independent evaluation of United States Department of Defense security policies, and conduct security assessments on DOD operating systems, applications, databases, and networks. DOD and EDS have had a 13-year relationship of providing DISA with a wide range of infrastructure services, hardware and software through the DISA I-Assure and Encore contract vehicles.[12]

      Of historical significance, just prior to the overthrow of the Shah of Iran, EDS was the IT company that developed the Iranian social security information system. During the 1979 overthrow, several EDS employees were detained by the transitioning government of Iran, causing H. Ross Perot to undertake extraordinary clandestine measures to get these employees out of Iran.[13] These events were recounted in Ken Follett’s book On Wings of Eagles.

      [edit] Client contract controversiesIn December 2003, EDS lost a 10-year £3 billion contract to run Inland Revenue IT services after a series of serious delays in the payment of tax credits, the contract instead being awarded to the company Cap Gemini. EDS had operated systems for the Inland Revenue since 1994 but the performance of its system had been low, causing late arrival of tax credit payments for hundreds of thousands of people.[14][15]
      In 2004, EDS was criticised by the UK’s National Audit Office for its work on IT systems for the UK’s Child Support Agency (CSA), which ran seriously over budget causing problems which led to the resignation of the CSA’s head, Doug Smith on 2004-11-27. The system’s rollout had been two years late and following its introduction in March 2003 the CSA was obliged to write off £1 billion in claims, while £750 million in child support payments from absent parents remained uncollected. An internal EDS memo was leaked that admitted that the CSA’s system was “badly designed, badly tested and badly implemented”. UK MPs described it as an “appalling waste of public money” and called for it to be scrapped.[16]
      In 2006, EDS’ Joint Personnel Administration (JPA) system for the RAF led to thousands of personnel not receiving correct pay due to “processing errors”. EDS and MoD staff were reported to have “no definitive explanations for the errors”.[17][18]
      In September 2007 EDS paid $500,000 to settle an action by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission regarding charges related to overstatement of its contract revenues in 2001–2003. At the time these caused a fall in share prices in 2002 which led to legal action against EDS from US shareholder groups.[19][20]
      On 2007-10-16, British TV company BSkyB claimed £709m compensation from EDS, claiming that EDS’ failure to meet its agreed service standards resulted not just from incompetence, but from fraud and deceit in the way it pitched for the contract.[20]
      During the BSkyB case, it was shown that a Managing Director had obtained a degree over the Internet. Lawyers for Sky were able to demonstrate that the process for awarding the degree claimed would give a degree to a dog, and that the mark attained by the dog was higher than that of the HP executive, who was questioned on his expertise and integrity. HP lost the case with a preliminary £200 million payment ordered, whilst they appeal over the £ 700 million total.[21]
      On 2008-10-10 it was reported that a Ministry of Defence hard drive potentially containing the details of 100,000 Armed Forces personnel could not be located by EDS.

  15. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_A._Laudicina
    Paul A. Laudicina (born August 9,1949) is the chairman of the board of A.T. Kearney.[1] He was elected as the manager officer of A.T. Kearney in September 2006 after the management buyout of the firm from EDS and was re-elected to a second term in 2009. Laudicina was also the founder and Managing Director of A.T. Kearney’s Global Business Policy Council, a strategic service for CEOs.[2]

    He is also the author of numerous articles and books and a speaker on economic issues. He featured as one of the “Top 25 Most Influential Consultants” by Consulting Magazine in 2005 and 2007[3].

    Contents [show]
    1 Biography and Career
    2 Books
    3 References
    4 External links

    [edit] Biography and CareerHe holds an bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Chicago.

    His career has included positions as research associate for the UN Center for Economic and Social Information, Associate Fellow of the Overseas Development Council, Legislative Director in the United States Senate, and Vice President of SRI International (Stanford Research Institute), where he founded its policy division.

    He is a member of a number of professional associations:

    American Economic Association
    Academy of Political Science
    Confederation of Indian Industry/World Economic Forum Advisory Council
    Advisory Committee of the Center for Strategic and International Studies – Seven Revolutions Initiative
    Board of Advisors of the Latin American Advisor
    He is a member of the Executive’s Club of Chicago, and attended the World Economic Forum in 2008, 2009, and 2012.[4][5]

    [edit] BooksWorld Out of Balance: Navigating Global Risks to Seize Competitive Advantage. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2005. ISBN 978-0-07-143918-3.[6] It has been published in French, as Le désordre du monde : les grands axes de l’avenir,[7] in German as Trendbuch Internationalisierung : wie Ihr Unternehmen vom Wandel profitiert,[8] in Japanese as 明日の世界を読む力 : ビジネスリーダーのための / Asu no sekai o yomu chikara : Bijinesurīdā no tameno,[9]
    World poverty and development: a survey of American opinion Washington, Overseas Development Council, 1973 OCLC 866226;[10] the book was reviewed in The American Political Science Review, Mar., 1977, vol. 71, no. 1, p. 418-419.[11]
    Beating the Global Odds: Successful Decision-Making in a Confused and Troubled World Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons Inc., 2012[12]
    [edit] References^ “A.T. Kearney Chairman Paul Laudicina on Global Change”. Chicago Booth News, University of Chicago, accessed November 13, 2011.
    ^ “Biography : Paul Laudicina”
    ^ “10th Anniversary : The Top 25 Consultants”
    ^ Muckerty.com
    ^ “A.T. Kearney at the World Economic Forum”
    ^ WorldCat
    ^ WorldCat entry for the translation
    ^ WorldCat entry for translation
    ^ WorldCat entry for translation
    ^ World poverty and development: a survey of American opinion (Monograph, 1973) WorldCat
    ^ Worldcat ref
    ^ http://www.atkearney.com/books/beating-the-global-odds
    [edit] External linksThe Globalist bio

  16. Renee says:

    Q&A: Genealogical Historians Stephen MacDonogh and Peter … http://www.libraryjournal.com/lj/newslettersnewsletterbucketbooksmack/887386-439/q...
    Oct 21, 2010… Virginia Goeldner, Ralph’s half-sister; and Roger Kearney, a fourth cousin three times removed, who has researched the Kearney genealogy.

  17. Renee says:

    Ralph Waldo Emerson Dunham (1894 – 1970) – Find A Grave … http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=32649741
    Jan 5, 2009 … “He really didn’t like it that much,” said Virginia Goeldner, 72, one of Dunham’s daughters. … Mary Ann Kearney Dunham (1869 – 1936) …

  18. Renee says:

    Ralph Waldo Emerson Dunham, Sr. (1894 – 1974) – Genealogy http://www.geni.com/people/Ralph-Waldo-Emerson-Dunham/6000000000240303197
    Jan 4, 2012 … Mary Ann (Kearney) Dunham. mother …. “He really didn’t like it that much,” said Virginia Goeldner, 72, one of Dunham’s daughters.

  19. Renee says:

    006 ELMWOOD CEMETERY (Henders Vance County NC Cemeteries cemeterycensus.com/nc/vanc/cem006k.htm
    Sep 2, 2012 … husband of Virginia G. Kearney. Sgt US Army World War II. Kearney, Virginia Goodrich (b. 19 Nov 1914 – d. 20 Apr 2008). wife of Murat J.

  20. Renee says:

    http://www.genealogymagazine.com/cullendavis.html
    Eli Whitney, Samuel Morse and Charles Goodyear relatives *

  21. Renee says:

    Dominique France (Franz) Picard aka Princess Fadilla of Egypt.
    Family line of Smith, Katherine Black, Picard, dit la Fortune (Fontaine), Hughes, Perrot (Parrot) etc..see top of this post again…
    *ROSS* SOROS* O’ROSS*

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ross_Perot
    After he left the Navy in 1957, Perot became a salesman for International Business Machines. He quickly became a top employee, one year filling his annual sales quota in two weeks,[11] and tried to pitch his ideas to supervisors who largely ignored him.[citation needed] He left IBM in 1962 to found Electronic Data Systems (EDS) in Dallas, Texas, and courted large corporations for his data processing services. Perot was refused seventy-seven times before he was given his first contract. EDS received lucrative contracts from the U.S. government in the 1960s, computerizing Medicare records. EDS went public in 1968 and the stock price rose from $16 a share to $160 within days. Fortune called Perot the “fastest, richest Texan” in a 1968 cover story.[citation needed] In 1984 General Motors bought controlling interest in EDS for $2.4 billion.

    In 1974 Perot gained some press attention for being “the biggest individual loser ever on the New York Stock Exchange” when his EDS shares dropped $450 million in value in a single day in April 1970.[12]

    Just prior to the 1979 Iranian Revolution, the government of Iran imprisoned two EDS employees in a contract dispute. Perot organized and sponsored their rescue. The rescue team was led by retired U.S. Army Special Forces Colonel Arthur D. “Bull” Simons. When the team was unable to find a way to extract their two prisoners, they decided to wait for a mob of pro-Ayatollah revolutionaries to storm the jail and free all 10,000 inmates, many of whom were political prisoners. The two prisoners then connected with the rescue team, and the team spirited them out of Iran via a risky border crossing into Turkey. The exploit was recounted in a book, On Wings of Eagles by Ken Follett, which became a best-seller. In the 1986 miniseries, Perot was portrayed by Richard Crenna.

  22. Renee says:

    http://www.wright.edu/maps/facility/allyn-hall
    Allyn Hall was the first and only campus building completed in 1964 when Wright State opened as the Dayton Branch Campus of The Ohio State and Miami Universities. Named for WSU founder Stanley Charles Allyn, retired president and chairman of the National Cash Register Corp.,

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wright_State_University

  23. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Cash_Register
    The company began as the National Manufacturing Company of Dayton, Ohio, which was established to manufacture and sell the first mechanical cash register, invented in 1879 by James Ritty. In 1884 the company and patents were bought by John Henry Patterson and his brother Frank Jefferson Patterson and the firm was renamed the National Cash Register Company. Patterson formed NCR into one of the first modern American companies, introducing new, aggressive sales methods and business techniques. He established the first sales training school in 1893, and introduced a comprehensive social welfare program for his factory workers.

    Other significant figures in the early history of the company were Charles F. Kettering, Thomas J. Watson, Sr. and Edward A. Deeds. Deeds and Kettering went on to found Dayton Engineering Laboratories Company which later became Delco Products Division of General Motors. Watson eventually worked his way up to general sales manager. Bent on inspiring the dispirited NCR sales force, Watson introduced the motto “THINK!” Signs with this motto were erected in factory buildings, sales offices, and club rooms during the mid-1890s. “THINK” later became a widely-known symbol of IBM. Kettering designed the first cash register powered by an electric motor in 1906. Within a few years he developed the Class 1000 register which was in production for 40 years, and the O.K. Telephone Credit Authorization system for verifying credit in department stores.[citation needed]

    [edit] American Selling ForceWhen John H. Patterson and his brother took over the company, cash registers were expensive ($50 USD) and only about a dozen of “Ritty’s Incorruptible Cashier” machines were in use. There was little demand for the expensive device, but Patterson believed the product would sell once shopkeepers understood it would drastically decrease theft by salesclerks. He created a sales force, called the “American Selling Force” which worked on commissions and followed a standard sales script, the “N.C.R. Primer.” The philosophy was to sell a business function, rather than just a piece of machinery. Sale demonstrations were set up in hotels (away from the distractions of the buyer’s business), depicting a store interior, complete with real merchandise and real cash. The sale prospect was described as the “P.P.” or “Probable Purchaser.” Once initial objections were swept aside and the P.P. admitted to internal theft losses, the product was demonstrated, along with large business charts and diagrams. The deal was sealed with a 25 cent cigar.[7]

    [edit] ExpansionNCR expanded quickly and became multi-national in 1888. Between 1893 and 1906 it acquired a number of smaller cash register companies.[8]

    By 1911 it had sold one million machines and grown to almost 6,000 employees. Combined with rigorous legal attacks, Patterson’s methods enabled the company to fight off, bankrupt or buy-out over 80 of its early competitors and achieve control of 95% of the U.S. market.

    In 1912, the company was found guilty of violating the Sherman Antitrust Act. Patterson, Deeds, Watson, and 25 other NCR executives and managers were convicted for illegal anti-competitive sales practices and were sentenced to one year of imprisonment. Their convictions were unpopular with the public due to the efforts of Patterson and Watson to help those affected by the Dayton, Ohio floods of 1913, but efforts to have them pardoned by President Woodrow Wilson were unsuccessful. However, their convictions were overturned on appeal in 1915 on the grounds that important defense evidence should have been admitted.

    WWII NCR posterTwo million units were sold by 1922, the year John Patterson died. In 1925 the company went public with an issue of $55 million in stock, at that time the largest public offering in United States history. During World War I the company manufactured shell fuzes and aircraft instrumentation, and during World War II built aero-engines, bomb sights and code-breaking machines, including the American bombe designed by Joseph Desch.

    [edit] Post-war
    Computer NCR 304Building on its wartime experience with secret communication systems, high speed counters, and cryptanalytic equipment,[9] NCR became a major post-war force in developing new computing and communications technology. In 1953, following its acquisition of Computer Research Corporation the previous year, the company created a specialised electronics division. In 1956, NCR introduced its first electronic device, the Class 29 Post-Tronic, a bank machine using magnetic stripe technology. With GE the company manufactured its first transistor-based computer in 1957, the NCR 304. Also in the 1950s NCR introduced MICR (Magnetic Ink Character Recognition).[10]

    In 1962, NCR introduced the NCR-315 Electronic Data Processing System which included the CRAM storage device, the first automated mass storage alternative to magnetic tape libraries accessed manually by computer operators. The NCR 390 and 500 computers were also offered to customers who did not need the full power of the 315. The company’s first all-integrated circuit computer was the Century 100 of 1968. The Century 200 was added in 1970. The line was extended through the Century 300, NCR’s first multiprocessor system. The Century series was followed by the Criterion series in 1976, NCR’s first virtual machine system.

    During this period NCR also produced the 605 minicomputer for in-house use. It was the compute engine for the 399 and 499 accounting machines, several generations of in-store and in-bank controllers, and the 82xx/90xx IMOS COBOL systems. The 605 also powered peripheral controllers, including the 658 disk subsystem and the 721 communications processor.

    By 1986 the number of mainframe makers had dropped from 8 (IBM and the “seven dwarfs”) to 6 (IBM and the “BUNCH”) to 4: IBM, Unisys, NCR, and Control Data Corporation.

    The company adopted the name NCR Corporation in 1974.

    [edit] Small computersIn 1982, NCR became involved in open systems architecture. Its first such system was the UNIX-powered TOWER 16/32, the success of which (approximately 100,000 were sold) established NCR as a pioneer in bringing industry standards and open systems architecture to the computer market. These 5000-series systems were based on Motorola 680xx CPUs and supported NCR’s proprietary transaction processing system TMX, which was mainly used by financial institutions.

    NCR office buildings in Augsburg, GermanyIn the 1980s, NCR sold various PC compatible AT-class computers, like the small NCR-3390 (called an “intelligent terminal”). They proposed a customized version of MS-DOS, NCR-DOS, which for example offered support for switching the CPU between 6, 8 or 10 MHz speeds. The computers featured an improved CGA adapter, the NGA, which had a 640×400 text mode more suitable for business uses than the original 640×200 mode, with characters drawn using single-pixel-wide lines, giving an appearance similar to that of classic IBM 3270 terminals. The additional four-color 640×400 graphical mode was identical to CGA’s 320×200 mode from a programming point of view.

    In 1990, NCR introduced the System 3000, a seven-level family of computers based on Intel’s 386 and 486 CPUs. The majority of the System 3000 range utilised IBM’s Micro Channel architecture rather than the more prevalent ISA architecture, and utilised SCSI peripherals as well as the more popular parallel and serial port interfaces, resulting in a premium product with premium pricing.

    [edit] Automated Teller MachinesAutomated Teller Machines (ATMs) are now NCR’s principal product line. NCR had made its first ATM in the late 1970s with widespread installations of the model 770 in National Westminster and Barclays Banks throughout the UK, but it was not until the Model 5070, developed at its Dundee plant in Scotland and introduced in 1983 that the company began to make more serious inroads into the ATM market. Subsequent models included the 5084, 56xx, and 58xx (Personas) series. In early 2008 the company launched its new generation of ATMs – the 662x/663x SelfServ series. NCR currently commands over a third of the entire ATM market, with an estimated $18 trillion being withdrawn from NCR ATMs every year. In addition, NCR’s expertise in this field led the company to contract with the U.S. Military to support the Eagle Cash program with customized ATMs.[11]

    [edit] NCR 5xxx seriesThe NCR 5xxx-series is the range of (ATM’s) produced by NCR from the early 1980s. Most models were designed and initially manufactured at its Dundee factory in Scotland, but later produced at several other locations around the world.

    There have been several distinct generations:

    50xx-series; The initial models introduced in 1983 were the 5070 (interior vestibule) and 5080 (Through The Wall or TTW) introduced a number of features which have become standard among ATM’s – chiefly the individual functions of the ATM are divided among discrete modules which can be easily removed and replaced for repair or replenishment. The 5080 featured the standard anti-vandal smoked perspex screen which covered the keypad and screen until the cardholder inserted their card. The enhanced 5084 TTW model appeared in 1987, and had an improved anti-vandal fascia and was the first ATM to dispense with the need for the retracting perspex screen. The 5085 offered the first crude deposit function; with the machine supplying the deposit envelopes which were subsequently stored in the machine’s safe for subsequent back office processing.
    56xx-series; produced from 1991 to 1997.
    Enhanced functions such as colour displays and improved security and usability functions became available. The introduction of Media Entry Indicators (MEI) which highlight the card entry slot to the customer was also a part of this series. Some 56xx machines produced between 1994–1996 were badged as “AT&T” rather than “NCR”, mirroring the company’s brief ownership under the telecoms giant in the mid 1990s. 56xx models have included the 5670 (interior lobby cash dispense only), 5675 (interior lobby multifunction – dispense & deposit), 5684 (exterior TTW dispense only), 5688 (exterior TTW drive-up multifunction) and 5685 (exterior TTW multifunction).

    58xx-series marketed as Personas from 1998 to the present. These models were characterised by the gradual move towards greater ATM functionality including intelligent, envelopeless deposit by means of automated cheque recognition modules, coin dispense, and electronic cash recognition functions which allows bank customers to deposit cash and cheques with instant processing of the transaction. The 58xx series has also been characterised by the gradual introduction of LCD displays instead of the traditional CRT monitor. Models have included the 5870 (compact interior lobby dispense only), 5873 (interior lobby with cash accept & deposit only), 5874 (Exterior TTW cash dispense), 5875 (Multifunction TTW). The latest TTW versions of the Personas line, introduced in 2000 and marketed as M-Series added functions such as cash recycling, coin dispense, barcode reading, a larger 12″ LCD display with touchscreen option, and for the first time, a common wall footprint for both the Multifunction (5886) or single function (5887).
    [edit] NCR 66XX seriesNCR’s 6th generation of ATMs have been noted for the further move towards intelligent deposit and the expansion of secondary functions such as barcode reading.

    667x-series marketed under the Personas M-Series brand were introduced in 2005 to the present. These models consist of the 6676 (interior lobby multifunction) and 6674 (through-the-wall multifunction). The outlook design is very different from the Personas model; on the front-access 6676s the front cover is opened upwards which claim to be saving the services area.
    [edit] NCR Self-Serv 20 & 30 seriesNCR’s latest ATM services, introduced in 2008.

    This series is a complete redesign of both outlook and technological contents. It is also a cost down product.

    Self-Serv 20 series are single-function (e.g. cash-out) ATMs, while Self-Serv 30 series are full-function (cash-out and intelligent deposit) machines.

    Self-Serv models are (Sep.2009): 6622 (interior lobby single-function, small footprint); 6625 (through-the-wall single-function); 6626 (through-the-wall version of 6622); 6631 (interior lobby deposit-only, small footprint); 6632 (interior lobby full-function); 6634 (through-the-wall version of 6632); 6636 (through-the-wall version of 6631); 6638 (drive-up full-function).

    [edit] AT&TNCR was acquired September 19, 1991 by AT&T Corporation for $7.4 billion and was joined with Teradata Corporation on February 28, 1992. As an AT&T subsidiary, its 1992 year-end headcount was 53,800 employees and contractors.[12] By 1993, the subsidiary produced a year-end $1.287 billion net loss on $7.265 billion in revenue. The net losses continued in 1994 and 1995, losses that required repeated subsidies from the parent company and resulted in a 1995 year-end headcount of 41,100.[12] During these three years, AT&T was the former NCR’s largest customer, accounting for over $1.5 billion in revenue.[12]

    On February 15, 1995, the company sold its microelectronics division and storage systems division to Hyundai which named it Symbios Logic. At the time it was the largest purchase of an American company by a Korean company.

    For a while, starting in 1994, the subsidiary was renamed AT&T Global Information Solutions, but in 1995, AT&T decided to spin off the company, and in 1996, changed its name back to NCR in preparation for the spin-off. The company outlined its reasons for the spin-off in an Information Statement sent to its stockholders, which cited, in addition to “changes in customer needs” and “need for focused management time and attention”, the following:

    …[A]dvantages of vertical integration [which had motivated ATT’s earlier acquisition of NCR] are outweighed by its costs and disadvantages….[T]o varying degrees, many of the actual and potential customers of Lucent and NCR are or will be competitors of AT&T’s communications services businesses. NCR believes that its efforts to target the communications industry have been hindered by the reluctance of AT&T’s communications services competitors to make purchases from an AT&T subsidiary.
    NCR re-emerged as a stand-alone company on January 1, 1997.

    [edit] IndependenceOne of NCR’s first significant acquisitions after becoming independent from AT&T came in July 1997 when it purchased Compris Technologies, a privately held company in Kennesaw, Georgia that produced software for restaurant chains.[13] In November 1997, NCR purchased Dataworks Inc., a 60-person privately held company in San Antonio, Texas.[14]

    The Montgomery County Historical Society and NCR Corporation joined in 1998 into an innovative partnership committed to preserving the voluminous NCR Archive. For more than three months in late 1999, trucks traveled between NCR’s Building 28 and the Historical Society’s Research Center, taking three million pieces of an extraordinary collection to their new home.

    In 1998, NCR sold its computer hardware manufacturing assets to Solectron and ceased to produce general-purpose computer systems, focusing instead on the retail and financial industries. In 2000, NCR acquired CRM provider Ceres Integrated Solutions and services company 4Front Technologies. Recent acquisitions include self-service companies Kinetics, InfoAmerica and Galvanon, and software company DecisionPoint. In 2006, NCR acquired software company IDVelocity and the ATM manufacturing division of Tidel, a cash security equipment manufacturer specializing in retail markets. In 2009, NCR became the second largest DVD Kiosk operator in North America with the acquisitions of The New Release and DVD Play. In 2010, NCR completed the acquisition of digital signage company, Netkey.

    Today, NCR’s R&D activity is split between its three major centres in Atlanta USA (Retail), Dundee, Scotland (Financial Industry), and Waterloo, Canada. It also has R&D centres in Pondicherry and Hyderabad in India.[15] NCR also has a manufacturing facility at Pondicherry in India, which is a regional manufacturing and export hub.

    [edit] Recent developmentsOn January 8, 2007, NCR announced its intention to separate into two independent companies by spinning off Teradata to shareholders. Bill Nuti would continue his role as president and CEO of NCR, while Teradata Senior VP Mike Koehler would assume leadership of Teradata.[1]. On 1 October 2007, NCR Corporation and Teradata jointly announced the Teradata business unit spin-off was complete, with Michael Koehler as the first CEO of Teradata.[2]

    On January 11, 2007, NCR announced plans to restructure its entire ATM manufacturing operations, with 650 jobs at its Dundee plant being cut [3] A further 450 jobs were cut in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. In 2009, the Dundee manufacturing facility was closed, along with plants in San Paulo and Bucharest, citing global economic conditions as the reason.

    NCR extended its self-service portfolio into the digital media market with the January announcement of NCR Xpress Entertainment, a next-generation multichannel entertainment kiosk solution. The launch of NCR Xpress Entertainment follows NCR’s acquisition of Touch Automation LLC on Dec. 31, 2007. [4]

    On October 15, 2008, NCR announced a global reseller partnership with Experticity, a Seattle-based software company.[5] NCR could now supplement its existing suite of technology offerings with the industry’s first market-proven in-store video customer support solution. According to Richard Arnold, NCR Vice President, Retail Industry Marketing, “Experticity’s innovative live video technology paired with flexible and robust self-service kiosks from NCR provides retailers with a way to redefine the in-store experience for their customers, while also improving business efficiencies by optimizing staffing resources.”

    NCR office building in Duluth, Georgia.On June 2, 2009, NCR announced a plan to relocate its corporate headquarters from Dayton, OH to Duluth, GA. This news was shocking as Dayton served as NCR’s home for 125 years. [6] “The decision to consolidate functions in Georgia and build a technology focused corporate headquarters campus is right in line with our business strategy to drive growth, improve our innovation output, increase productivity and continually upgrade our focus on the customer,” said Bill Nuti, NCR’s chairman and chief executive officer.

    On July 11, 2011, NCR agreed to purchase Radiant Systems, a hospitality and retail systems company, for US$1.2B. NCR plans to turn Radiant into a new business division that is focused on hospitality and specialty retail. Several Radiant executives will remain on board and will be led by the company’s chief operating officer, Andrew Heyman. “Radiant Systems is a logical and strategic extension for NCR, moving us into attractive fast-growth adjacent markets,” Bill Nuti, NCR’s chairman and chief executive, said in a statement. “We will bring together two strong teams with Radiant Systems playing a vital role in enhancing our long-term growth, margin expansion and earnings appreciation.”[7]

    On August 22, 2011, Radiant announced the completion of the tender offer by NCR Corporation.[16]

    On August 24, 2011, NCR Corporation completed the acquisition of Radiant Systems.[17]

    [edit] Products and services[edit] Hardware
    NCR FastLaneItem Processing platforms (mainly checks) (7780, iTRAN 8000, TS)
    PCs (System 3000)
    POS interfaces (RealPOS)
    POS printers (RealPOS)
    POS scanners (RealScan)
    POS workstations and peripherals (RealPOS)
    Self-service checkouts (NCR SelfServ Checkout, formerly NCR FastLane)
    Self-service hardware, ATMs and kiosks (EasyPoint, Personas, SelfServ)
    Servers (S1600, S2600, System 5000, Tower)
    [edit] ServicesE-business
    Education
    IT infrastructure services
    Managed services
    Payment solutions
    Retail solutions
    Self-service
    [edit] ObsoleteClass 1000 register
    Class 2000 bank posting machine (c. 1922-1973)
    NCR Voyager, an i386 SMP computer platform that preceded Intel’s SMP specification.
    Electronic shelf labels (RealPrice – discontinued 2008)
    [edit] Senior managementCEO: Bill Nuti (August 8, 2005 – present)
    CEO: Mark Hurd (2003–2005)
    CEO: Lars Nyberg (1996–2003)
    CEO: Jerre Stead (1993–1995) company renamed AT&T GIS
    CEO: Charles E. Exley, Jr. (1983–1993)
    CEO: William S. Anderson (1973–1984)
    CEO: Robert S. Oelman (1962–1973)
    CEO: Stanley C. Allyn (1957–1962)
    CEO: Edward A. Deeds (1931–1957)
    CEO: Frederick Beck Patterson (1922–1931)
    CEO: John H. Patterson (1884–1922)
    Interim CEO: Jim Ringler (2005)
    Interim CEO: Bill O’Shea (1995)
    Interim CEO: Gil Williamson (1993)

  24. Renee says:

    Several years I found Stan Allen at the university of Beiruit…hummm…looking for him for a reunion is where the posts were.

    *GARDNER*
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Allen

    And this long ago posted as well- many times.;
    Here is what is on the SS Application:
    Full Name: Kelly Ann Green DOB 11-8-64 Present Age: 8 your sex Female your race White (choices were white, negro, other btw)
    Place of Birth: Kenmore Eire, New York. Mother’s full name at birth: Shirley L. Loughrey
    Fathers Full name: Robert R Green
    Mailing address 814 Pioneer North Tonawanda, NY 14120
    Todays date 2-3-73 and then her signature.

    Certification of Marriage
    Certificate No. 151 1997-011752
    Name of Groom
    James Timothy Dunham
    Date of Birth November 23, 1965 Place of Birth: Chicago, Illinois
    Usual residence: 956 Honokahua Pl County: Honolulu State or Country: Hawaii
    Fathers Name: John Edward Dunham State or Country of Birth: Illinois

    Mother’s maiden name Geraldine Ann O’neill State or country of birth: Michigan

    Name of Bride: Kelly Lynn Allen
    Date of Birth: October 1, 1968 Place of Birth: Redlands, California
    Usual Residence 956 Honokahua Pl, Honolulu, Hawaii
    Father’s name: Grandison Greer Allen State or country of Birth: USA-unknown
    Mother’s name Kay Joyce Dickerson State or country of Birth: USA-unknown
    Groom’s declared middle name: Timothy Brides declared middle name(s) Allen
    Grooms declared surname: Dunham Bride’s declared surname: Dunham
    Date of Marriage August 15, 1997 Place of ceremony: Waiokeola Congregational Church, Honolulu
    Date filed with local registrar August 19, 1997 Date copy was issued: June 30, 1999

    http://www.interfaithalliancehawaii.org/who_we_are00.html

      • Renee says:

        http://fourthdimensionalrecovery.wordpress.com/category/pima-county-corruption/
        5-22-2012 NSA ‘Fortress’ Adjacent To Suspected FEMA Concentration Camp
        May 22, 2012
        Pima County Corruption
        4 Comments Originally published on November 30, 2011

        In an article posted on May 10, 2011, “Pima plans new communications hub Midtown structure of ‘Brutalism’ style facing demolition,” by Tom Beal of the Arizona Daily Star, it is announced from a memo submitted to the county board of supervisors, Chuck Huckleberry, that he intends to proceed with plans to tear down a 500-square-foot round building that once served as the Valley National Bank’s cafeteria.

        “Demolition of this structure is necessary to minimize risks associated with maintaining public-safety communications during an emergency.”
        The Administrator also said, “That is the only place on-site where an Emergency-Management operations center can be located,” said county administrator, Chuck Huckleberry

        This emergency, said county director of facilities management Reid Spaulding, that the building, “… needs to withstand certain seismic and cataclysmic events.” Supporting statement by Valdez went on to say that he’d like to save the round building, but “… we really need to have an emergency operations center. It’s vital we have it up and running.”

        The overall feel of the article was crafted with a spin in mind. This diversional concept is embedded with historical value of the building rather than identify what the ultimate agenda beyond the stated reason of the building is really intended.

        The question raised, if one looks at the remarks made by officials is; what specific cataclysmic event are they referring to and for what reason is this facility going to cost taxpayers millions of dollars? What warrants this decision when nothing else but federal buildings are designed to withstand ‘some event’ not validated anywhere for any specific scientific reason?

        It is based on speculation rooted in fear. In my opinion, this is one convincing tactic implemented in order to acquire approval for non affordable funding.

        In a subsequent article posted in the Arizona Daily Star on August 3, 2011, “Pima County refuses to save ‘Brutal’ architecture,” reporter Rhonda Bodfield reports that almost 100 million dollars is being used in an effort to overhaul communications throughout the county which includes several communications towers.

        She continues on stating that almost 15 million of it went to Sundt Construction for the building currently under renovation. When the anticipated project comes online in 2014 [overall project] the communications center will allow every police and fire agency in the county to communicate to one another, but does not include the state and federal systems.

        I’d like to interject a concept that may link to the actions taken for a comprehensive communications system. It is alleged that former Pima County Detective Cindy Butierrez working closely with a software project termed “CopLink” is implicated in the Gifford’s “Congress on your Corner Massacre” as being very similar in appearance and voice to Roxanna Green, the mother of Christina-Taylor Green who was pronounced dead at the scene on January 8, 2011.

        The two women share near identical voice characteristics and appear as if they could be identical twins. CopLink is currently in use today and provides the same function as this proposed NSA intelligence center.

        ***NOTE***
        Former Pima County Detective Cindy Butierrez working closely with a software project termed “CopLink” is implicated in the Gifford’s “Congress on your Corner Massacre” as being very similar in appearance and voice to Roxanna Green, the mother of Christina-Taylor Green who was pronounced dead at the scene on January 8, 2011.

        ***ROXANNA GREEN ?*** mom of Christina Taylor Green ?

      • Renee says:

        GREEN ?
        See top of this post again *

        Renee | March 10, 2011 at 12:29 pm
        Hugues Picard dit LaFortune
        Nov 13, 2004 … I began building the database for Hugues Picard dit LaFortune from various mailing list postings and emails with descendents of this line. …

        freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~picard/Hug…

        Renee | March 10, 2011 at 12:55 pm
        THE DESCENDANTS OF BERTRAND CHESNAY dit LAGARENNE – Person …
        Jan 28, 2011 … Children of Hughes PICARD dit LAFORTUNE and Anne Antoinette LIERCOURT … Hughes PICARD dit LAFORTUNE+ b. 1627, d. 22 December 1707 …

        chesnay.homestead.com/files/ChesnayE-o/p117.html

        http://chesnay.homestead.com/files/SmithE-o/p8.htm

        Renee | March 11, 2011 at 3:17 pm
        Chesney
        Chandler again..

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenny_Chesney

        Renee | March 11, 2011 at 3:18 pm
        Chesney was born on March 26, 1968, in Knoxville, Tennessee at St. Mary’s Medical Center and raised in Luttrell, Tennessee, better known as the home of Chet Atkins. He is the son of David Chesney, a former elementary school teacher, and Karen Chandler, a hair stylist in the Knoxville area. Chesney has one sibling, a younger sister named Jennifer Chandler. In 1986 Chesney graduated from Gibbs High School where he played baseball and football.

        Renee | March 10, 2011 at 12:56 pm
        DESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM SMITH AND CATHERINE BLACK …
        Children of Hughes PICARD dit LAFORTUNE and Anne Antoinette LIERCOURT …

        chesnay.homestead.com/files/SmithE-o/p8.html

        • Renee says:
          http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~chesnay/p6.htm THE DESCENDANTS OF BERTRAND CHESNAY dit LAGARENNE Sieur de la Haye Person Page – 6 Main Page Surname Index Master Index Images Places Index Jean Evangéliste CHENE b. 1777, d. 29 December 1842 Jean Evangéliste CHENE|b. 1777nd. 29 Dec 1842|p6.htm#i351|Charles Etienne CHENAY|b. 16 May 1737nd. 26 Dec 1809|p1.htm#i64|Marie Louise CROTEAU|b. Nov 1740nd. Jan 1802|p1.htm#i65|Charles CHENAY|b. 25 May 1712nd. 16 Jul 1760|p1.htm#i66|Geneviève DUMATS|b. b 1724nd. 6 Jun 1773|p1.htm#i67|Jean F. CROTEAU|b. 16 May 1722|p2.htm#i79|Geneviève M. L. COTE|b. 9 Nov 1719|p2.htm#i80| Relationship=3rd great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Jean Evangéliste CHENE was born in 1777. He was the son of Charles Etienne CHENAY and Marie Louise CROTEAU. He married Marguerite MEVILLE (MAINVILLE) DUCHESNES, daughter of Charles MEVILLE (MAINVILLE) and Marguerite MICHAUX, on 11 May 1801 in St-Eustache, QC, Canada. He died on 29 December 1842 in St-Hermas, QC, Canada. He was buried on 31 December 1842 in St-Hermas, QC. Jean was a labourer. Children of Jean Evangéliste CHENE and Marguerite MEVILLE (MAINVILLE) DUCHESNES Charles François CHENE+ b. 22 Feb 1802, d. 9 Jul 1875 Joseph CHENE b. 13 Jul 1803 Marie Eugénie CHENE+ b. 4 Mar 1805 Jean Baptiste CHENE+ b. 27 Jun 1807, d. 25 Jun 1879 François Xavier CHENE+ b. 24 Sep 1809 Marguerite CHENE+ b. 25 Feb 1811 Louis CHENE+ b. 21 Dec 1812, d. 13 Apr 1882 Antoine CHENE b. 25 Feb 1815 Jean Baptiste CHENAY b. 22 August 1744, d. 25 October 1744 Jean Baptiste CHENAY|b. 22 Aug 1744nd. 25 Oct 1744|p6.htm#i352|Charles CHENAY|b. 25 May 1712nd. 16 Jul 1760|p1.htm#i66|Geneviève DUMATS|b. b 1724nd. 6 Jun 1773|p1.htm#i67|Jean B. CHESNAY|b. 25 Nov 1682nd. 7 Sep 1731|p1.htm#i68|Elisabeth BOUCHER|b. 12 Feb 1682nd. 25 Apr 1738|p1.htm#i69|Charles DUMAS|b. 7 May 1671nd. 10 Apr 1734|p2.htm#i81|Marthe (Madeleine) Genevieve GARANT (GARAND)|b. 31 Aug 1675nd. 7 Jul 1724|p2.htm#i82| Relationship=4th great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Jean Baptiste CHENAY was born on 22 August 1744 in St-Antoine, St-Antoine-de-Tilly, QC, Canada,, and was baptized on 22 August 1744 in Godparents: Jacques Caron & Marie Elizabeth Marié. He was the son of Charles CHENAY and Geneviève DUMATS. He was buried on 25 October 1744 in . He died on 25 October 1744 in at the age of 0. Jean Baptiste CHENAY b. 19 November 1745, d. February 1749 Jean Baptiste CHENAY|b. 19 Nov 1745nd. Feb 1749|p6.htm#i353|Charles CHENAY|b. 25 May 1712nd. 16 Jul 1760|p1.htm#i66|Geneviève DUMATS|b. b 1724nd. 6 Jun 1773|p1.htm#i67|Jean B. CHESNAY|b. 25 Nov 1682nd. 7 Sep 1731|p1.htm#i68|Elisabeth BOUCHER|b. 12 Feb 1682nd. 25 Apr 1738|p1.htm#i69|Charles DUMAS|b. 7 May 1671nd. 10 Apr 1734|p2.htm#i81|Marthe (Madeleine) Genevieve GARANT (GARAND)|b. 31 Aug 1675nd. 7 Jul 1724|p2.htm#i82| Relationship=4th great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Jean Baptiste CHENAY was born on 19 November 1745 in St-Antoine, St-Antoine-de-Tilly, QC, Canada,, and was baptized on 20 November 1745 in Godparents: Jean-Baptiste Huot & Geneviève Costé. He was the son of Charles CHENAY and Geneviève DUMATS. He was buried on 11 February 1749 in . He died in February 1749 in at the age of 3. Maurice Arthur CHENIER b. 1916, d. 17 February 1966 Maurice Arthur CHENIER|b. 1916nd. 17 Feb 1966|p6.htm#i354|Marie-Armand Napoléon CHENIER|b. 2 Sep 1885nd. 18 Apr 1964|p208.htm#i14531|Marie-Louise Marguerite ST.LAURENT||p208.htm#i14532|Léon CHENIER (CHESNIER)|b. 13 Nov 1848nd. 27 Dec 1914|p208.htm#i14527|Cordélia ROCAN||p208.htm#i14528|Louis P. A. ST.LAURENT||p209.htm#i14578|Eloise-Elmina ROBERT||p209.htm#i14579| Relationship=3rd cousin 1 time removed of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Maurice Arthur CHENIER was born in 1916 in Winnipeg, MB, Canada. He was the son of Marie-Armand Napoléon CHENIER and Marie-Louise Marguerite ST.LAURENT. He married Agnes Elizabeth WHITE on 14 June 1944 in Vancouver, BC, Canada. He died on 17 February 1966 in Winnipeg, MB. Children of Maurice Arthur CHENIER and Agnes Elizabeth WHITE Marguerite Elizabeth CHENIER+ (living) Doreen Agnes CHENIER+ (living) Donald Maurice CHENIER+ (living) Thérèse Joan CHENIER+ (living) Jean Baptiste CHENE b. November 1768 Jean Baptiste CHENE|b. Nov 1768|p6.htm#i355|Charles Etienne CHENAY|b. 16 May 1737nd. 26 Dec 1809|p1.htm#i64|Marie Louise CROTEAU|b. Nov 1740nd. Jan 1802|p1.htm#i65|Charles CHENAY|b. 25 May 1712nd. 16 Jul 1760|p1.htm#i66|Geneviève DUMATS|b. b 1724nd. 6 Jun 1773|p1.htm#i67|Jean F. CROTEAU|b. 16 May 1722|p2.htm#i79|Geneviève M. L. COTE|b. 9 Nov 1719|p2.htm#i80| Relationship=3rd great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Jean Baptiste CHENE was born in November 1768 in St-Laurent, Montréal, QC, Canada,, and was baptized on 16 November 1768 in Montréal, QC. He was the son of Charles Etienne CHENAY and Marie Louise CROTEAU. He married Françoise DENOYER (DESNOYERS), daughter of François DENOYER and Angèle GRAVEL, on 13 June 1797 in St-Martin, QC, Canada. Jean was a labourer. Children of Jean Baptiste CHENE and Françoise DENOYER (DESNOYERS) Marie Françoise CHENE b. 19 Apr 1800 François CHENE b. 3 Jul 1801, d. 2 Oct 1801 Marie Louise CHENE+ b. 30 Jan 1803 Pierre CHENE+ b. 29 Jun 1804, d. 1 Jan 1871 Jean-Baptiste CHENE+ b. 26 Jan 1806, d. 19 Apr 1854 Joseph CHENE+ b. 29 May 1807, d. 11 Jan 1855 Marie Sophie CHENE+ b. 4 Jan 1809, d. 9 May 1882 François Xavier CHENE b. 18 Jun 1810 Charles CHENE+ b. 17 Sep 1811, d. 3 Jul 1898 Isidore CHENE+ b. 7 Oct 1812, d. 12 Apr 1876 Alexandre CHENE b. 30 Nov 1814, d. 8 Aug 1830 Henriette CHENE b. 8 Mar 1816, d. 22 Sep 1816 Zoé Emélie Marie CHENE b. 3 Feb 1818 Théophile CHENE b. 8 Dec 1819, d. 27 Aug 1832 Cléophée (Sophie) CHENE+ b. 13 Jun 1821, d. 5 May 1857 Jean Baptiste CHENE b. 5 March 1809, d. 19 December 1886 Jean Baptiste CHENE|b. 5 Mar 1809nd. 19 Dec 1886|p6.htm#i356|Joseph CHENE|b. Sep 1781nd. 1 May 1852|p1.htm#i62|Marie Louise GROULX|b. 1791|p1.htm#i63|Charles E. CHENAY|b. 16 May 1737nd. 26 Dec 1809|p1.htm#i64|Marie L. CROTEAU|b. Nov 1740nd. Jan 1802|p1.htm#i65|Toussaint GROULX|b. c 1755|p2.htm#i77|Marie C. PIMPARE|b. 17 Feb 1756|p2.htm#i78| Relationship=2nd great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Jean Baptiste CHENE was born on 5 March 1809 in St-Benoit, QC, Canada. He was the son of Joseph CHENE and Marie Louise GROULX, and was baptized on 5 March 1809 in St-Benoit, QC, Godparents: Joseph Chéné & Marie Louise Biroleau. He married Marguerite LEGAULT DESLAURIERS, daughter of Toussaint LEGAULT (LEGOS DELORIER) and Marie Amable VIAU, on 17 January 1831 in St-Benoit, QC. He died on 19 December 1886 in Ottawa, ON, Canada, at the age of 77. His name at the time of death was written as Jean Baptiste CHENIER. He was buried on 21 December 1886 in Ottawa, ON. Jean was a farmer. Children of Jean Baptiste CHENE and Marguerite LEGAULT DESLAURIERS Marguerite CHENE+ b. 30 Aug 1832 Jean Baptiste CHENE+ b. 24 Apr 1834, d. 1917 Adéline CHENE b. 15 May 1835 Esther CHENE b. 16 Apr 1836 Adéline CHENAY b. 27 Apr 1838, d. 11 May 1838 Sophie CHENAY b. 25 May 1839 Siméon CHENAY b. 25 Jun 1841 Napoléon CHENAY b. 1842, d. 2 Mar 1848 Alphonse CHENE b. 18 Aug 1843, d. 5 Apr 1846 Marie Hurtimise (Heurtumise) CHENAY b. 17 Jun 1846 Siméon CHENAY b. 13 Nov 1848 Alphonse CHENAY+ b. 2 Apr 1850, d. Jul 1930 Benjamin CHENAY b. 25 Jan 1852, d. 20 Mar 1856 Sophie CHENAY b. 5 Apr 1853, d. 5 Aug 1853 Philomène CHENAY b. 17 Jul 1854 Elzire (Alzire) CHENAY b. 17 May 1857 Joseph CHESNAY b. 19 April 1667, d. before 1687 Joseph CHESNAY|b. 19 Apr 1667nd. b 1687|p6.htm#i357|Bertrand CHESNAY dit LAGARENNE Sieur de Lotinville|b. Feb 1622nd. 16 Jan 1683|p1.htm#i70|Marie Madeleine BELANGER|b. Feb 1643nd. Jan 1670|p3.htm#i160|Nicolas CHESNAY dit LAGARENNE Sieur de la Haye|b. c 1599|p2.htm#i72|Catherine LA RINGUE|b. c 1599|p2.htm#i84|François BELANGER|b. c 1620nd. c 1686|p8.htm#i523|Marie GUYON|b. b 18 Mar 1624nd. 29 Aug 1696|p8.htm#i524| Relationship=6th great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Joseph CHESNAY was born on 19 April 1667 in Château Richer, QC, Canada,, and was baptized on 20 April 1667 in Château Richer, QC. He was the son of Bertrand CHESNAY dit LAGARENNE Sieur de Lotinville and Marie Madeleine BELANGER. He died before 1687. Joseph CHENAY b. 15 November 1718, d. 28 April 1743 Joseph CHENAY|b. 15 Nov 1718nd. 28 Apr 1743|p6.htm#i358|Jean Baptiste CHESNAY|b. 25 Nov 1682nd. 7 Sep 1731|p1.htm#i68|Elisabeth BOUCHER|b. 12 Feb 1682nd. 25 Apr 1738|p1.htm#i69|Bertrand CHESNAY dit LAGARENNE Sieur de Lotinville|b. Feb 1622nd. 16 Jan 1683|p1.htm#i70|Elisabeth AUBERT|b. 22 Feb 1654nd. 1693|p2.htm#i71|Jean B. BOUCHER|b. c 1658nd. 28 Aug 1700|p2.htm#i86|Marie M. PARE|b. 16 Jun 1662nd. 14 Feb 1718|p2.htm#i87| Relationship=5th great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Joseph CHENAY was born on 15 November 1718 in Ile-d’Orléans, QC, Canada,, and was baptized on 15 November 1718 in Ile-d’Orléans, QC. He was the son of Jean Baptiste CHESNAY and Elisabeth BOUCHER. He died on 28 April 1743 in Ste-Anne-de-la-Pocatière, QC, Canada, at the age of 24. Joseph CHENE b. 7 December 1805 Joseph CHENE|b. 7 Dec 1805|p6.htm#i359|Joseph CHENE|b. Sep 1781nd. 1 May 1852|p1.htm#i62|Marie Louise GROULX|b. 1791|p1.htm#i63|Charles E. CHENAY|b. 16 May 1737nd. 26 Dec 1809|p1.htm#i64|Marie L. CROTEAU|b. Nov 1740nd. Jan 1802|p1.htm#i65|Toussaint GROULX|b. c 1755|p2.htm#i77|Marie C. PIMPARE|b. 17 Feb 1756|p2.htm#i78| Relationship=2nd great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Joseph CHENE was born on 7 December 1805 in St-Benoit, QC, Canada,, and was baptized on 8 December 1805 in St-Benoit, QC, Godparents: Charles Chêné & Charlotte Pimparé. He was the son of Joseph CHENE and Marie Louise GROULX. He married Victoire LEGAULT DELORIER, daughter of Toussaint LEGAULT (LEGOS DELORIER) and Marie Amable VIAU, on 4 August 1823 in St-Benoit, QC. He married Josephte DESVOYAUX dit LAFRAMBOISE, daughter of Nicolas DESVOYAUX dit LAFRAMBOISE and Josephte FAUTEUX, on 31 January 1848 in St-Hermas, QC, Canada. He was buried on 14 April 1860. Joseph was a farmer. Children of Joseph CHENE and Victoire LEGAULT DELORIER Marcellin CHENE+ b. 12 Apr 1824, d. 24 Jun 1895 Marie Hypollite CHENE b. 12 Mar 1825, d. 5 Apr 1825 Joseph CHENE+ b. 5 Mar 1826 Charles CHENE+ b. 17 Sep 1827 Evangéliste (Jean) CHENE+ b. 4 Feb 1829, d. 7 Aug 1912 Isidore CHENE b. 18 Mar 1830, d. 21 Jun 1830 François CHENE b. 27 Mar 1831, d. 27 Jun 1831 Marie Esther CHENE b. 6 May 1832, d. 3 Mar 1833 Marie Auré CHENE b. 16 Aug 1833 Antoine CHENE+ b. 1834, d. 25 Jul 1907 Henri Maurice (Orice) CHENAY+ b. 1835, d. 1 Jun 1913 Domitille CHENE b. 26 Mar 1836, d. 29 Jun 1903 Louise CHENE b. 3 Aug 1837, d. 27 Sep 1837 Louise CHENAY b. 1 Jan 1839, d. 21 Sep 1839 Zéphirine CHENAY b. 28 May 1841, d. 30 Mar 1872 Philomène CHENAY+ b. 8 Mar 1843, d. 16 Nov 1922 Olive CHENAY b. 26 Nov 1844, d. 28 Mar 1875 Marie Isabelle CHENAY b. 23 Feb 1847, d. 19 Apr 1847 Children of Joseph CHENE and Josephte DESVOYAUX dit LAFRAMBOISE (?) CHENAY b. 22 Nov 1848, d. 22 Nov 1848 Marie Louise CHENAY b. 1 Mar 1850 (?) CHENAY b. 29 Aug 1851, d. 29 Aug 1851 (?) CHENAY b. Jul 1857, d. Jul 1857 Lise CHENIER Lise CHENIER||p6.htm#i360|Réal Arthur Noël CHENIER|b. 25 Dec 1922nd. 8 Dec 1977|p2.htm#i128|Rollande MENARD||p3.htm#i163|Hermas I. CHENIER|b. 28 Feb 1891nd. 19 Oct 1964|p1.htm#i43|Emma BENARD|b. 4 Aug 1893nd. 24 Mar 1937|p2.htm#i123|Alexandre MENARD|b. c 1900|p76.htm#i5258|Régina MARTINEAU|b. c 1901|p76.htm#i5259| Relationship=2nd cousin of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Lise CHENIER is the daughter of Réal Arthur Noël CHENIER and Rollande MENARD. She married Pierre TREMBLAY, son of Lionel TREMBLAY and Georgette PAGE, on 4 June 1977 in Gracefield, QC, Canada. Louis CHESNAY b. 26 August 1678, d. circa 1703 Louis CHESNAY|b. 26 Aug 1678nd. c 1703|p6.htm#i361|Bertrand CHESNAY dit LAGARENNE Sieur de Lotinville|b. Feb 1622nd. 16 Jan 1683|p1.htm#i70|Elisabeth AUBERT|b. 22 Feb 1654nd. 1693|p2.htm#i71|Nicolas CHESNAY dit LAGARENNE Sieur de la Haye|b. c 1599|p2.htm#i72|Catherine LA RINGUE|b. c 1599|p2.htm#i84|Claude AUBERT|b. c 1614nd. 19 Mar 1694|p2.htm#i83|Jacqueline LUCAS|b. c 1617nd. 24 Aug 1680|p2.htm#i85| Relationship=6th great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Louis CHESNAY was born on 26 August 1678 in Québec, QC, Canada,, and was baptized on 27 August 1678 in Québec, QC. He was the son of Bertrand CHESNAY dit LAGARENNE Sieur de Lotinville and Elisabeth AUBERT. He married Jeanne MARTIN, daughter of Barnabé MARTIN and Jeanne PELLETRET, circa 1698 in Port Royal, Acadie. He died circa 1703. Biographical Notes: Louis Chesnay must have died before 1704 because Jeanne Martin remarried Gabriel Samson on 7 Apr 1704. Jeanne and Gabriel had a daughter, Marguerite Louise, born 10 Jul 1715, baptised 6 Oct 1715 in Port Royal. Godfather was Joseph Gravin and Godmother was Marie Josephe Chenaie (Chesnay), Jeannne’s first daughter from her first marriage. Source: Vol VIII Port Royal, by Bona Arsenault. Children of Louis CHESNAY and Jeanne MARTIN Jean Baptiste CHESNAY+ b. 1700, d. b 1767 Marie Josèphe CHESNAY+ b. c 1702, d. 13 Nov 1764 Louise CHENAY b. 18 May 1837, d. 8 March 1838 Louise CHENAY|b. 18 May 1837nd. 8 Mar 1838|p6.htm#i362|Charles CHENAY|b. 18 Sep 1811nd. 11 Jan 1874|p5.htm#i291|Marie Louise BRAZEAU|b. 1813nd. 12 Mar 1901|p5.htm#i290|Joseph CHENE|b. Sep 1781nd. 1 May 1852|p1.htm#i62|Marie L. GROULX|b. 1791|p1.htm#i63|François BRAZEAU|b. c 1790|p94.htm#i6557|Marguerite SAUVE (SICARD)|b. c 1792|p94.htm#i6558| Relationship=1st cousin 3 times removed of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Louise CHENAY was born on 18 May 1837 in St-Benoit, QC, Canada. She was the daughter of Charles CHENAY and Marie Louise BRAZEAU. She died on 8 March 1838 in St-Hermas, QC, Canada, at the age of 0. She was buried on 15 March 1838 in St-Hermas, QC. Marie Louise CHAISNE b. 24 June 1749, d. 31 March 1781 Marie Louise CHAISNE|b. 24 Jun 1749nd. 31 Mar 1781|p6.htm#i363|Charles CHENAY|b. 25 May 1712nd. 16 Jul 1760|p1.htm#i66|Geneviève DUMATS|b. b 1724nd. 6 Jun 1773|p1.htm#i67|Jean B. CHESNAY|b. 25 Nov 1682nd. 7 Sep 1731|p1.htm#i68|Elisabeth BOUCHER|b. 12 Feb 1682nd. 25 Apr 1738|p1.htm#i69|Charles DUMAS|b. 7 May 1671nd. 10 Apr 1734|p2.htm#i81|Marthe (Madeleine) Genevieve GARANT (GARAND)|b. 31 Aug 1675nd. 7 Jul 1724|p2.htm#i82| Relationship=4th great-grandaunt of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Marie Louise CHAISNE was born on 24 June 1749 in St-Antoine, St-Antoine-de-Tilly, QC, Canada. She was the daughter of Charles CHENAY and Geneviève DUMATS, and was baptized on 24 June 1749 in Godparents: Philippe Noël Sieur de Tilly & Marie Louise Bouquet. Her baptism name was Marie Louise CHAISNE. She died on 31 March 1781 in at the age of 31. Her name at the time of death was written as Marie Louise CHAISNE. She was buried on 1 May 1781 in . Marie Louise CHENE b. 5 July 1807, d. 20 July 1808 Marie Louise CHENE|b. 5 Jul 1807nd. 20 Jul 1808|p6.htm#i364|Joseph CHENE|b. Sep 1781nd. 1 May 1852|p1.htm#i62|Marie Louise GROULX|b. 1791|p1.htm#i63|Charles E. CHENAY|b. 16 May 1737nd. 26 Dec 1809|p1.htm#i64|Marie L. CROTEAU|b. Nov 1740nd. Jan 1802|p1.htm#i65|Toussaint GROULX|b. c 1755|p2.htm#i77|Marie C. PIMPARE|b. 17 Feb 1756|p2.htm#i78| Relationship=2nd great-grandaunt of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Marie Louise CHENE was born on 5 July 1807 in St-Benoit, QC, Canada,, and was baptized on 5 July 1807 in St-Benoit, QC, Godparents: Jean Chênai & Marie Louise Thibault. She was the daughter of Joseph CHENE and Marie Louise GROULX. She died on 20 July 1808 in St-Benoit, QC, at the age of 1. She was buried on 22 July 1808 in St-Benoit, QC. Marie Louise CHENE b. 7 June 1817 Marie Louise CHENE|b. 7 Jun 1817|p6.htm#i365|Joseph CHENE|b. Sep 1781nd. 1 May 1852|p1.htm#i62|Marie Louise GROULX|b. 1791|p1.htm#i63|Charles E. CHENAY|b. 16 May 1737nd. 26 Dec 1809|p1.htm#i64|Marie L. CROTEAU|b. Nov 1740nd. Jan 1802|p1.htm#i65|Toussaint GROULX|b. c 1755|p2.htm#i77|Marie C. PIMPARE|b. 17 Feb 1756|p2.htm#i78| Relationship=2nd great-grandaunt of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Marie Louise CHENE was born on 7 June 1817 in St-Benoit, QC, Canada,, and was baptized on 8 June 1817 in St-Benoit, QC. She was the daughter of Joseph CHENE and Marie Louise GROULX. She married Augustin LANIEL (LAGRICELL), son of Augustin LANIEL (LAGRICELLE) and Desanges LABONTE, on 5 February 1838 in St-Hermas, QC, Canada. Lucie Marie Jacqueline CHENIER Lucie Marie Jacqueline CHENIER||p6.htm#i366|Réal Arthur Noël CHENIER|b. 25 Dec 1922nd. 8 Dec 1977|p2.htm#i128|Rollande MENARD||p3.htm#i163|Hermas I. CHENIER|b. 28 Feb 1891nd. 19 Oct 1964|p1.htm#i43|Emma BENARD|b. 4 Aug 1893nd. 24 Mar 1937|p2.htm#i123|Alexandre MENARD|b. c 1900|p76.htm#i5258|Régina MARTINEAU|b. c 1901|p76.htm#i5259| Relationship=2nd cousin of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Lucie Marie Jacqueline CHENIER is the daughter of Réal Arthur Noël CHENIER and Rollande MENARD. Marguerite CHESNAY b. 15 January 1669, d. 3 February 1669 Marguerite CHESNAY|b. 15 Jan 1669nd. 3 Feb 1669|p6.htm#i367|Bertrand CHESNAY dit LAGARENNE Sieur de Lotinville|b. Feb 1622nd. 16 Jan 1683|p1.htm#i70|Marie Madeleine BELANGER|b. Feb 1643nd. Jan 1670|p3.htm#i160|Nicolas CHESNAY dit LAGARENNE Sieur de la Haye|b. c 1599|p2.htm#i72|Catherine LA RINGUE|b. c 1599|p2.htm#i84|François BELANGER|b. c 1620nd. c 1686|p8.htm#i523|Marie GUYON|b. b 18 Mar 1624nd. 29 Aug 1696|p8.htm#i524| Relationship=6th great-grandaunt of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Marguerite CHESNAY was born on 15 January 1669 in L’Ange-Gardien, QC, Canada. She was the daughter of Bertrand CHESNAY dit LAGARENNE Sieur de Lotinville and Marie Madeleine BELANGER, and was baptized on 19 January 1669 in Château Richer, QC, Canada. She died on 3 February 1669 in Château Richer, QC, at the age of 0. Marguerite CHENE b. 30 May 1824 Marguerite CHENE|b. 30 May 1824|p6.htm#i368|Joseph CHENE|b. Sep 1781nd. 1 May 1852|p1.htm#i62|Marie Louise GROULX|b. 1791|p1.htm#i63|Charles E. CHENAY|b. 16 May 1737nd. 26 Dec 1809|p1.htm#i64|Marie L. CROTEAU|b. Nov 1740nd. Jan 1802|p1.htm#i65|Toussaint GROULX|b. c 1755|p2.htm#i77|Marie C. PIMPARE|b. 17 Feb 1756|p2.htm#i78| Relationship=2nd great-grandaunt of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Marguerite CHENE was born on 30 May 1824 in St-Benoit, QC, Canada. She was the daughter of Joseph CHENE and Marie Louise GROULX. She married Eustache BERTRAND, son of Jean Baptiste BERTRAND and Josephte FILION, on 14 August 1843 in St-Hermas, QC, Canada. Child of Marguerite CHENE and Eustache BERTRAND Maurice BERTRAND b. 23 Feb 1849 Marguerite Marie CHENE b. November 1761 Marguerite Marie CHENE|b. Nov 1761|p6.htm#i369|Charles Etienne CHENAY|b. 16 May 1737nd. 26 Dec 1809|p1.htm#i64|Marie Louise CROTEAU|b. Nov 1740nd. Jan 1802|p1.htm#i65|Charles CHENAY|b. 25 May 1712nd. 16 Jul 1760|p1.htm#i66|Geneviève DUMATS|b. b 1724nd. 6 Jun 1773|p1.htm#i67|Jean F. CROTEAU|b. 16 May 1722|p2.htm#i79|Geneviève M. L. COTE|b. 9 Nov 1719|p2.htm#i80| Relationship=3rd great-grandaunt of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Marguerite Marie CHENE was born in November 1761 in Ile Jésus, Montréal, QC, Canada. She was baptized on 9 November 1761 in Montréal, QC. She was the daughter of Charles Etienne CHENAY and Marie Louise CROTEAU. She married Charles LANGEVIN, (widower of Catherine Denis), on 27 February 1786 in St-Martin, QC, Canada. Marie Geneviève CHENAY b. 9 June 1738, d. 14 January 1764 Marie Geneviève CHENAY|b. 9 Jun 1738nd. 14 Jan 1764|p6.htm#i370|Charles CHENAY|b. 25 May 1712nd. 16 Jul 1760|p1.htm#i66|Geneviève DUMATS|b. b 1724nd. 6 Jun 1773|p1.htm#i67|Jean B. CHESNAY|b. 25 Nov 1682nd. 7 Sep 1731|p1.htm#i68|Elisabeth BOUCHER|b. 12 Feb 1682nd. 25 Apr 1738|p1.htm#i69|Charles DUMAS|b. 7 May 1671nd. 10 Apr 1734|p2.htm#i81|Marthe (Madeleine) Genevieve GARANT (GARAND)|b. 31 Aug 1675nd. 7 Jul 1724|p2.htm#i82| Relationship=4th great-grandaunt of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Marie Geneviève CHENAY was born on 9 June 1738 in St-Antoine, St-Antoine-de-Tilly, QC, Canada,, and was baptized on 9 June 1738 in Godparents: Pierre Chainé & Marie Françoise Lambert. She was the daughter of Charles CHENAY and Geneviève DUMATS. She married Louis Marie CROTEAU, son of Louis CROTEAU and Marie Anne ROBERGE, on 4 October 1762 in . She died on 14 January 1764 in at the age of 25. Her name at the time of death was written as Marie CHESNAY. She was buried on 15 January 1764 in . Marie Irène CHENIER b. 29 July 1899, d. 8 March 1979 Marie Irène CHENIER|b. 29 Jul 1899nd. 8 Mar 1979|p6.htm#i371|Noël (Noé) CHENIER|b. 24 Dec 1853nd. 10 Oct 1920|p1.htm#i56|Eléonore DEROUIN|b. 1859nd. 14 Oct 1936|p3.htm#i155|François X. CHENE|b. 7 Jun 1813nd. 28 Oct 1868|p1.htm#i52|Angélique (Angèle) Julie LALANDE|b. c 1819|p1.htm#i53|François DEROUIN|b. c 1832|p69.htm#i4810|Victoire CARRIERE|b. c 1834|p69.htm#i4811| Relationship=1st cousin 2 times removed of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Marie Irène CHENIER was born on 29 July 1899 in Plantagenet, ON, Canada,, and was baptized on 30 July 1899 in Wendover, ON, Canada, Godparents: Charles Viau & Rose de Lima Chénier. She was the daughter of Noël (Noé) CHENIER and Eléonore DEROUIN. She married Eugène Damasse GAREAU, son of Raoul GAREAU and Adéline CRAPEAU (ST.JACQUES), on 26 October 1925 in Rockland, ON, Canada. She died on 8 March 1979 in Montréal, QC, Canada, at the age of 79. She was buried in March 1979 in St-Benoît-Labre Cemetery, Wendover, ON, Canada. Marie CHENAY b. circa 1705, d. June 1790 Marie CHENAY|b. c 1705nd. Jun 1790|p6.htm#i372|Jean Baptiste CHESNAY|b. 25 Nov 1682nd. 7 Sep 1731|p1.htm#i68|Elisabeth BOUCHER|b. 12 Feb 1682nd. 25 Apr 1738|p1.htm#i69|Bertrand CHESNAY dit LAGARENNE Sieur de Lotinville|b. Feb 1622nd. 16 Jan 1683|p1.htm#i70|Elisabeth AUBERT|b. 22 Feb 1654nd. 1693|p2.htm#i71|Jean B. BOUCHER|b. c 1658nd. 28 Aug 1700|p2.htm#i86|Marie M. PARE|b. 16 Jun 1662nd. 14 Feb 1718|p2.htm#i87| Relationship=5th great-grandaunt of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Marie CHENAY was born circa 1705. She was the daughter of Jean Baptiste CHESNAY and Elisabeth BOUCHER. She married Charles HUOT dit SAINT-LAURENT, son of Laurent HUOT dit SAINT-LAURENT and Françoise FAVRON, on 11 June 1733 in St-Nicolas, QC, Canada. She was buried on 5 June 1790 in St-Nicolas, QC. She died in June 1790 in St-Nicolas, QC. Child of Marie CHENAY and Charles HUOT dit SAINT-LAURENT Marie Charlotte HUOT dit SAINT-LAURENT b. c 1740 Marie Louise CHENAY b. 24 January 1847, d. 26 December 1909 Marie Louise CHENAY|b. 24 Jan 1847nd. 26 Dec 1909|p6.htm#i373|Charles CHENAY|b. 18 Sep 1811nd. 11 Jan 1874|p5.htm#i291|Marie Louise BRAZEAU|b. 1813nd. 12 Mar 1901|p5.htm#i290|Joseph CHENE|b. Sep 1781nd. 1 May 1852|p1.htm#i62|Marie L. GROULX|b. 1791|p1.htm#i63|François BRAZEAU|b. c 1790|p94.htm#i6557|Marguerite SAUVE (SICARD)|b. c 1792|p94.htm#i6558| Relationship=1st cousin 3 times removed of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Marie Louise CHENAY was born on 24 January 1847 in St-Hermas, QC, Canada,, and was baptized on 25 January 1847 in St-Hermas, QC, Godparents: Joseph Brazeau & Louise Groulx. She was the daughter of Charles CHENAY and Marie Louise BRAZEAU. She married Joseph PAGE, son of Pierre PAGE and Désanges BRUNET, on 3 November 1868 in Buckingham, QC, Canada. She died on 26 December 1909 in Buckingham, QC, at the age of 62. She was buried on 29 December 1909 in Buckingham, QC. Marie CHESNAY b. 20 August 1658, d. 30 September 1730 Marie CHESNAY|b. 20 Aug 1658nd. 30 Sep 1730|p6.htm#i374|Bertrand CHESNAY dit LAGARENNE Sieur de Lotinville|b. Feb 1622nd. 16 Jan 1683|p1.htm#i70|Marie Madeleine BELANGER|b. Feb 1643nd. Jan 1670|p3.htm#i160|Nicolas CHESNAY dit LAGARENNE Sieur de la Haye|b. c 1599|p2.htm#i72|Catherine LA RINGUE|b. c 1599|p2.htm#i84|François BELANGER|b. c 1620nd. c 1686|p8.htm#i523|Marie GUYON|b. b 18 Mar 1624nd. 29 Aug 1696|p8.htm#i524| Relationship=6th great-grandaunt of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Marie CHESNAY was born on 20 August 1658 in Québec, QC, Canada. She was the daughter of Bertrand CHESNAY dit LAGARENNE Sieur de Lotinville and Marie Madeleine BELANGER, and was baptized on 22 September 1658 in Québec, QC. She married Joseph PETIT dit BRUNEAU, son of Henri PETIT dit BRUNEAU and Elizabeth FONTAINE, on 16 September 1675 in Québec, QC. She died on 30 September 1730 in Maskinongé, QC, Canada, at the age of 72. Children of Marie CHESNAY and Joseph PETIT dit BRUNEAU Joseph PETIT dit BRUNEAU+ b. 22 Aug 1676 Marie Madeleine PETIT dit BRUNEAU b. 15 Feb 1678 Marie Jeanne PETIT dit BRUNEAU+ b. 12 Jul 1680, d. 14 Mar 1710 Gertrude PETIT dit BRUNEAU b. 19 Sep 1682 Pierre PETIT dit BRUNEAU b. 18 Feb 1684, d. 1 May 1684 Marguerite PETIT dit BRUNEAU b. 23 Mar 1685, d. 25 Jun 1689 Jean Baptiste PETIT dit BRUNEAU+ b. 19 Nov 1687 Marie-Josèph PETIT dit BRUNEAU b. 26 Feb 1689 Marie-Anne PETIT dit BRUNEAU b. 25 Jul 1691 Geneviève PETIT dit BRUNEAU b. 20 Jun 1696 Marie Louise CHENAY b. March 1764 Marie Louise CHENAY|b. Mar 1764|p6.htm#i375|Charles Etienne CHENAY|b. 16 May 1737nd. 26 Dec 1809|p1.htm#i64|Marie Louise CROTEAU|b. Nov 1740nd. Jan 1802|p1.htm#i65|Charles CHENAY|b. 25 May 1712nd. 16 Jul 1760|p1.htm#i66|Geneviève DUMATS|b. b 1724nd. 6 Jun 1773|p1.htm#i67|Jean F. CROTEAU|b. 16 May 1722|p2.htm#i79|Geneviève M. L. COTE|b. 9 Nov 1719|p2.htm#i80| Relationship=3rd great-grandaunt of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. , and was baptized on 13 March 1764 in Ile Jésus, Montréal, QC, Canada. Marie Louise CHENAY was born in March 1764 in Montréal, QC. She was the daughter of Charles Etienne CHENAY and Marie Louise CROTEAU. She married François PLOUFFE, son of Maurice PLOUFFE and Marie MENARD, on 3 November 1784 in St-Martin, QC, Canada. Mathias (Charles) CHENAY b. 17 January 1851 Mathias (Charles) CHENAY|b. 17 Jan 1851|p6.htm#i376|Charles CHENAY|b. 18 Sep 1811nd. 11 Jan 1874|p5.htm#i291|Marie Louise BRAZEAU|b. 1813nd. 12 Mar 1901|p5.htm#i290|Joseph CHENE|b. Sep 1781nd. 1 May 1852|p1.htm#i62|Marie L. GROULX|b. 1791|p1.htm#i63|François BRAZEAU|b. c 1790|p94.htm#i6557|Marguerite SAUVE (SICARD)|b. c 1792|p94.htm#i6558| Relationship=1st cousin 3 times removed of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Mathias (Charles) CHENAY was born on 17 January 1851 in St-Hermas, QC, Canada,, and was baptized on 17 January 1851 in St-Hermas, QC, Godparents: Louis Daragon & Flavie Labrosse. He was the son of Charles CHENAY and Marie Louise BRAZEAU. He married Malvina Joséphine BOILEAU, daughter of Adolphe BOILEAU and Céline CARRIERE, on 14 October 1882 in Buckingham, QC, Canada. Child of Mathias (Charles) CHENAY and Malvina Joséphine BOILEAU Marie Malvina CHENAY b. 6 Jun 1896, d. 7 Jun 1896 Mathias CHENIER b. 26 March 1885, d. 2 December 1967 Mathias CHENIER|b. 26 Mar 1885nd. 2 Dec 1967|p6.htm#i377|Mathias CHENIER|b. 29 Jul 1851nd. 30 Jan 1929|p3.htm#i165|Alexina BRANCHAUD|b. 8 Apr 1865nd. 4 Jul 1942|p3.htm#i166|Antoine CHENE|b. 27 Jun 1821nd. 20 Apr 1895|p5.htm#i331|Domitile VIAU|b. 1825nd. b 20 Apr 1895|p8.htm#i531|Antoine BRANCHAUD|b. 30 Mar 1804|p9.htm#i581|Rose HEBERT|b. c 1829|p9.htm#i582| Relationship=2nd cousin 2 times removed of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Mathias CHENIER was born on 26 March 1885 in Maniwaki, QC, Canada. He was the son of Mathias CHENIER and Alexina BRANCHAUD, and was baptized on 29 March 1885 in Maniwaki, QC, Godparents: Xavier Danville & Marie Hébert. He married Eugénie KELLY-POIRIER, daughter of John KELLY and Georgina POIRIER, on 23 September 1907 in Hull, QC, Canada. He married Stella BOUCHARD, daughter of Charles Louis BOUCHARD and Belval PETRONILLE, on 6 May 1916 in Ottawa, ON, Canada. He died on 2 December 1967 in Montréal, QC, Canada, at the age of 82. Children of Mathias CHENIER and Eugénie KELLY-POIRIER Eugène CHENIER+ b. 1909 Maxime Rolland Joseph CHENIER b. 30 May 1912, d. Sep 1982 Albert Fernand Joseph CHENIER (living) Joseph Maxime Urgel CHENIER+ b. c 1914 Marie Louise Eugénie CHENIER b. 5 May 1915 Child of Mathias CHENIER and Stella BOUCHARD Fernand CHENIER+ b. 1914 Nicolas CHENE b. circa 1786 Nicolas CHENE|b. c 1786|p6.htm#i378|Charles Etienne CHENAY|b. 16 May 1737nd. 26 Dec 1809|p1.htm#i64|Marie Louise CROTEAU|b. Nov 1740nd. Jan 1802|p1.htm#i65|Charles CHENAY|b. 25 May 1712nd. 16 Jul 1760|p1.htm#i66|Geneviève DUMATS|b. b 1724nd. 6 Jun 1773|p1.htm#i67|Jean F. CROTEAU|b. 16 May 1722|p2.htm#i79|Geneviève M. L. COTE|b. 9 Nov 1719|p2.htm#i80| Relationship=3rd great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Nicolas CHENE was born circa 1786. He was the son of Charles Etienne CHENAY and Marie Louise CROTEAU. Olive CHENAY b. 4 March 1845, d. 12 December 1870 Olive CHENAY|b. 4 Mar 1845nd. 12 Dec 1870|p6.htm#i379|Charles CHENAY|b. 18 Sep 1811nd. 11 Jan 1874|p5.htm#i291|Marie Louise BRAZEAU|b. 1813nd. 12 Mar 1901|p5.htm#i290|Joseph CHENE|b. Sep 1781nd. 1 May 1852|p1.htm#i62|Marie L. GROULX|b. 1791|p1.htm#i63|François BRAZEAU|b. c 1790|p94.htm#i6557|Marguerite SAUVE (SICARD)|b. c 1792|p94.htm#i6558| Relationship=1st cousin 3 times removed of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Olive CHENAY was born on 4 March 1845 in St-Hermas, QC, Canada,, and was baptized on 5 March 1845 in St-Hermas, QC, Godparents: Etienne Huneau & Olive Drouin. She was the daughter of Charles CHENAY and Marie Louise BRAZEAU. She married Joseph ST.ONGE, son of Nicolas ST.ONGE and Geneviève RIOPEL, on 25 January 1858 in St-Hermas, QC. She died on 12 December 1870 in Ripon, QC, Canada, at the age of 25. She was buried on 14 December 1870 in St-Casimir, Ripon, QC, Canada. Philomène CHENAY b. 2 December 1840, d. 20 November 1842 Philomène CHENAY|b. 2 Dec 1840nd. 20 Nov 1842|p6.htm#i380|Charles CHENAY|b. 18 Sep 1811nd. 11 Jan 1874|p5.htm#i291|Marie Louise BRAZEAU|b. 1813nd. 12 Mar 1901|p5.htm#i290|Joseph CHENE|b. Sep 1781nd. 1 May 1852|p1.htm#i62|Marie L. GROULX|b. 1791|p1.htm#i63|François BRAZEAU|b. c 1790|p94.htm#i6557|Marguerite SAUVE (SICARD)|b. c 1792|p94.htm#i6558| Relationship=1st cousin 3 times removed of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Philomène CHENAY was born on 2 December 1840 in St-Hermas, QC, Canada. She was the daughter of Charles CHENAY and Marie Louise BRAZEAU, and was baptized on 4 December 1840 in St-Hermas, QC, Godparents: Félix Chénay & Josephte Nepveu. She died on 20 November 1842 in St-Hermas, QC, at the age of 1. She was buried on 21 November 1842 in St-Hermas, QC. Philomène CHENAY b. 7 March 1848 Philomène CHENAY|b. 7 Mar 1848|p6.htm#i381|Charles CHENAY|b. 18 Sep 1811nd. 11 Jan 1874|p5.htm#i291|Marie Louise BRAZEAU|b. 1813nd. 12 Mar 1901|p5.htm#i290|Joseph CHENE|b. Sep 1781nd. 1 May 1852|p1.htm#i62|Marie L. GROULX|b. 1791|p1.htm#i63|François BRAZEAU|b. c 1790|p94.htm#i6557|Marguerite SAUVE (SICARD)|b. c 1792|p94.htm#i6558| Relationship=1st cousin 3 times removed of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Philomène CHENAY was born on 7 March 1848 in St-Hermas, QC, Canada,, and was baptized on 8 March 1848 in St-Hermas, QC, Godparents: Séraphin Chénay & Hélène Huneau. She was the daughter of Charles CHENAY and Marie Louise BRAZEAU. She married Joseph BOUCHARD, son of Isidore BOUCHARD and Marie PROULX, on 27 August 1883 in Buckingham, QC, Canada. Pierre Marie CHENAY b. 5 April 1741, d. 9 July 1741 Pierre Marie CHENAY|b. 5 Apr 1741nd. 9 Jul 1741|p6.htm#i382|Charles CHENAY|b. 25 May 1712nd. 16 Jul 1760|p1.htm#i66|Geneviève DUMATS|b. b 1724nd. 6 Jun 1773|p1.htm#i67|Jean B. CHESNAY|b. 25 Nov 1682nd. 7 Sep 1731|p1.htm#i68|Elisabeth BOUCHER|b. 12 Feb 1682nd. 25 Apr 1738|p1.htm#i69|Charles DUMAS|b. 7 May 1671nd. 10 Apr 1734|p2.htm#i81|Marthe (Madeleine) Genevieve GARANT (GARAND)|b. 31 Aug 1675nd. 7 Jul 1724|p2.htm#i82| Relationship=4th great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Pierre Marie CHENAY was born on 5 April 1741 in St-Antoine, St-Antoine-de-Tilly, QC, Canada,, and was baptized on 6 April 1741 in Godparents: Pierre Chesnay & Marie Geneviève Dumas. He was the son of Charles CHENAY and Geneviève DUMATS. He was buried on 9 July 1741 in . He died on 9 July 1741 in at the age of 0. Pierre CHENAY b. 13 December 1713 Pierre CHENAY|b. 13 Dec 1713|p6.htm#i383|Jean Baptiste CHESNAY|b. 25 Nov 1682nd. 7 Sep 1731|p1.htm#i68|Elisabeth BOUCHER|b. 12 Feb 1682nd. 25 Apr 1738|p1.htm#i69|Bertrand CHESNAY dit LAGARENNE Sieur de Lotinville|b. Feb 1622nd. 16 Jan 1683|p1.htm#i70|Elisabeth AUBERT|b. 22 Feb 1654nd. 1693|p2.htm#i71|Jean B. BOUCHER|b. c 1658nd. 28 Aug 1700|p2.htm#i86|Marie M. PARE|b. 16 Jun 1662nd. 14 Feb 1718|p2.htm#i87| Relationship=5th great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Pierre CHENAY was born on 13 December 1713 in St-Pierre, QC, Canada,, and was baptized on 13 December 1713 in St-Pierre, QC. He was the son of Jean Baptiste CHESNAY and Elisabeth BOUCHER. He married Geneviève (Marie Angélique) COTE, daughter of Joseph COTE and Marie Anne LAMBERT, on 11 September 1741 in St-Antoine, St-Antoine-de-Tilly, QC, Canada. He married Marie Charlotte DEMERS, daughter of Joseph Eustache DEMERS and Françoise (Thérèse) BOUCHER, on 14 February 1752 in Lévis, QC, Canada. Children of Pierre CHENAY and Geneviève (Marie Angélique) COTE Marie Geneviève CHENAY b. 10 Nov 1742, d. 21 Feb 1743 Pierre CHENAY+ b. 21 Aug 1744, d. 24 Nov 1831 Marie Geneviève CHENAY b. 11 May 1746 Augustin CHENAY b. 17 Nov 1747, d. 21 Feb 1749 Joseph Charles CHAISNE+ b. 2 Jun 1749, d. 25 Jan 1825 Angélique Geneviève CHENAY b. 3 Apr 1751, d. 7 Apr 1752 Child of Pierre CHENAY and Marie Charlotte DEMERS Louis CHENAY b. 27 Jun 1753, d. 9 Jul 1753 Pierre CHENAY b. 26 September 1747 Pierre CHENAY|b. 26 Sep 1747|p6.htm#i384|Charles CHENAY|b. 25 May 1712nd. 16 Jul 1760|p1.htm#i66|Geneviève DUMATS|b. b 1724nd. 6 Jun 1773|p1.htm#i67|Jean B. CHESNAY|b. 25 Nov 1682nd. 7 Sep 1731|p1.htm#i68|Elisabeth BOUCHER|b. 12 Feb 1682nd. 25 Apr 1738|p1.htm#i69|Charles DUMAS|b. 7 May 1671nd. 10 Apr 1734|p2.htm#i81|Marthe (Madeleine) Genevieve GARANT (GARAND)|b. 31 Aug 1675nd. 7 Jul 1724|p2.htm#i82| Relationship=4th great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Pierre CHENAY was born on 26 September 1747 in St-Antoine, St-Antoine-de-Tilly, QC, Canada,, and was baptized on 26 September 1747 in . He was the son of Charles CHENAY and Geneviève DUMATS. He married Marie Thérèse FRECHETTE, daughter of Jean Baptiste FRECHETTE and Ursule ROUSSEAU, on 28 October 1771 in . Children of Pierre CHENAY and Marie Thérèse FRECHETTE Thérèse CHENAY b. 21 Sep 1772 Marie Anne CHENAY b. c 1775 Elisabeth CHENAY b. 10 Jan 1776 Pierre CHENAY b. 12 Sep 1777, d. 12 Sep 1777 Ursule CHENAY b. 22 Mar 1780, d. 17 Nov 1860 François Xavier CHENAY+ b. c 1793 Arline Rosalie (Auxilia) CHENIER b. 24 May 1876, d. 5 March 1960 Arline Rosalie (Auxilia) CHENIER|b. 24 May 1876nd. 5 Mar 1960|p6.htm#i385|Alexis CHENIER|b. 1 Nov 1846nd. 3 Jan 1927|p1.htm#i60|Rosalie GODMAIRE|b. 1854nd. 22 May 1934|p3.htm#i158|François X. CHENE|b. 7 Jun 1813nd. 28 Oct 1868|p1.htm#i52|Angélique (Angèle) Julie LALANDE|b. c 1819|p1.htm#i53|Pierre GODMERE|b. c 1800|p89.htm#i6193|Marie FILIATRAULT|b. 1814|p89.htm#i6194| Relationship=1st cousin 2 times removed of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Arline Rosalie (Auxilia) CHENIER was born on 24 May 1876 in Clarence Creek, ON, Canada,, and was baptized on 25 May 1876 in Ste-Félicité, Clarence Creek, ON, Canada, Godparents: Cyrille Chénier & Julie Desrocher. She was the daughter of Alexis CHENIER and Rosalie GODMAIRE. She married Olivier DUPONT, son of Arthur Octave DUPONT and Julie CHAREST, on 9 October 1894 in Curran, ON, Canada. She died on 5 March 1960 in Ottawa, ON, Canada, at the age of 83. She was buried on 8 March 1960 in St-Luc Cemetery, Curran, ON, Canada. Séraphin CHENE b. 26 May 1819, d. 18 February 1872 Séraphin CHENE|b. 26 May 1819nd. 18 Feb 1872|p6.htm#i386|Joseph CHENE|b. Sep 1781nd. 1 May 1852|p1.htm#i62|Marie Louise GROULX|b. 1791|p1.htm#i63|Charles E. CHENAY|b. 16 May 1737nd. 26 Dec 1809|p1.htm#i64|Marie L. CROTEAU|b. Nov 1740nd. Jan 1802|p1.htm#i65|Toussaint GROULX|b. c 1755|p2.htm#i77|Marie C. PIMPARE|b. 17 Feb 1756|p2.htm#i78| Relationship=2nd great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Séraphin CHENE was born on 26 May 1819 in St-Benoit, QC, Canada,, and was baptized on 27 May 1819 in St-Benoit, QC. He was the son of Joseph CHENE and Marie Louise GROULX. He died on 18 February 1872 in St-Hermas, QC, Canada, at the age of 52. He was buried on 20 February 1872 in St-Hermas, QC. Séraphin was a farmer. Marie Claire Sylvie CHENIER Marie Claire Sylvie CHENIER||p6.htm#i387|Réal Arthur Noël CHENIER|b. 25 Dec 1922nd. 8 Dec 1977|p2.htm#i128|Rollande MENARD||p3.htm#i163|Hermas I. CHENIER|b. 28 Feb 1891nd. 19 Oct 1964|p1.htm#i43|Emma BENARD|b. 4 Aug 1893nd. 24 Mar 1937|p2.htm#i123|Alexandre MENARD|b. c 1900|p76.htm#i5258|Régina MARTINEAU|b. c 1901|p76.htm#i5259| Relationship=2nd cousin of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Marie Claire Sylvie CHENIER is the daughter of Réal Arthur Noël CHENIER and Rollande MENARD. Louise (Eloise) CHENIER b. 21 January 1839 Louise (Eloise) CHENIER|b. 21 Jan 1839|p6.htm#i388|Charles CHENAY|b. 18 Sep 1811nd. 11 Jan 1874|p5.htm#i291|Marie Louise BRAZEAU|b. 1813nd. 12 Mar 1901|p5.htm#i290|Joseph CHENE|b. Sep 1781nd. 1 May 1852|p1.htm#i62|Marie L. GROULX|b. 1791|p1.htm#i63|François BRAZEAU|b. c 1790|p94.htm#i6557|Marguerite SAUVE (SICARD)|b. c 1792|p94.htm#i6558| Relationship=1st cousin 3 times removed of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Louise (Eloise) CHENIER was born on 21 January 1839 in Ste-Scholastique, QC, Canada,, and was baptized on 21 January 1839 in Ste-Scholastique, QC, Godparents: François Chénier & Louise Brazeau. She was the daughter of Charles CHENAY and Marie Louise BRAZEAU. She married Léon ST.ONGE, son of Nicolas ST.ONGE and Geneviève RIOPEL, on 25 January 1858 in St-Hermas, QC, Canada. Child of Louise (Eloise) CHENIER and Léon ST.ONGE Charles ST.ONGE b. 1861 Thomas CHENE b. 13 May 1827, d. 12 March 1833 Thomas CHENE|b. 13 May 1827nd. 12 Mar 1833|p6.htm#i389|Joseph CHENE|b. Sep 1781nd. 1 May 1852|p1.htm#i62|Marie Louise GROULX|b. 1791|p1.htm#i63|Charles E. CHENAY|b. 16 May 1737nd. 26 Dec 1809|p1.htm#i64|Marie L. CROTEAU|b. Nov 1740nd. Jan 1802|p1.htm#i65|Toussaint GROULX|b. c 1755|p2.htm#i77|Marie C. PIMPARE|b. 17 Feb 1756|p2.htm#i78| Relationship=2nd great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Thomas CHENE was born on 13 May 1827 in St-Benoit, QC, Canada. He was the son of Joseph CHENE and Marie Louise GROULX. He died on 12 March 1833 in St-Benoit, QC, at the age of 5. Toussaint CHENE b. 23 June 1810, d. 21 July 1810 Toussaint CHENE|b. 23 Jun 1810nd. 21 Jul 1810|p6.htm#i390|Joseph CHENE|b. Sep 1781nd. 1 May 1852|p1.htm#i62|Marie Louise GROULX|b. 1791|p1.htm#i63|Charles E. CHENAY|b. 16 May 1737nd. 26 Dec 1809|p1.htm#i64|Marie L. CROTEAU|b. Nov 1740nd. Jan 1802|p1.htm#i65|Toussaint GROULX|b. c 1755|p2.htm#i77|Marie C. PIMPARE|b. 17 Feb 1756|p2.htm#i78| Relationship=2nd great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Toussaint CHENE was born on 23 June 1810 in St-Benoit, QC, Canada,, and was baptized on 23 June 1810 in St-Benoit, QC, Godparents: Toussaint Lebruis & Charlotte Filion. He was the son of Joseph CHENE and Marie Louise GROULX. He was buried on 21 July 1810 in St-Benoit, QC. He died on 21 July 1810 in St-Benoit, QC, at the age of 0. Marie Véronique CHENAY b. 26 January 1754, d. 27 September 1754 Marie Véronique CHENAY|b. 26 Jan 1754nd. 27 Sep 1754|p6.htm#i391|Charles CHENAY|b. 25 May 1712nd. 16 Jul 1760|p1.htm#i66|Geneviève DUMATS|b. b 1724nd. 6 Jun 1773|p1.htm#i67|Jean B. CHESNAY|b. 25 Nov 1682nd. 7 Sep 1731|p1.htm#i68|Elisabeth BOUCHER|b. 12 Feb 1682nd. 25 Apr 1738|p1.htm#i69|Charles DUMAS|b. 7 May 1671nd. 10 Apr 1734|p2.htm#i81|Marthe (Madeleine) Genevieve GARANT (GARAND)|b. 31 Aug 1675nd. 7 Jul 1724|p2.htm#i82| Relationship=4th great-grandaunt of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Marie Véronique CHENAY was born on 26 January 1754 in St-Antoine, St-Antoine-de-Tilly, QC, Canada. She was the daughter of Charles CHENAY and Geneviève DUMATS, and was baptized on 27 January 1754 in Godparents: Charles Huot dit St.Laurent & Marie Françoise Celebumere(?). Her baptism name was Marie Véronique CHAISNE. She died on 27 September 1754 in at the age of 0. Her name at the time of death was written as Marie Véronique CHAISNE. She was buried on 28 September 1754 in . William SMITH b. circa 1758 William SMITH|b. c 1758|p6.htm#i392|(?) SMITH||p320.htm#i22395|||||||||||||||| Relationship=3rd great-grandfather of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. William SMITH was born circa 1758. He was the son of (?) SMITH. He married Catherine BLACK circa 1786. Research Notes: The origins of William Smith & Catherine Black remain a mystery. Ever since the records were given to me by my cousin Murielle Smith back about 1988 all the research to find his marriage or his parents (or Catherine Black’s) have led to dead ends. I’ve looked at all the archived marriage records in Ottawa, Hull and even in Gaspé. However, these are only copies and not the actual birth or marriage records themselves, in other words reports like “répertoires”, loyalists claims to the crown and loyalist listings and books. I spent some time in the town of Gaspé in summer of 1992 while touring the Gaspé region. Some questions posed to the achivist/librarian at the museum where records were kept left me with a frustrated feeling. Nevertheless, if research could produce copies of their marriage, or that of James or birth certificates of any of their children maybe they might show something interesting. There is a William Smith who put in a claim as a Loyalist to the Crown in the amount of 660 Lbs. The records say that he came from Ireland around 1774. He “could” be the one, but, no way to prove it unless he came with a Catherine Black. Catherine Black did remarry in 1822. With this fact in mind we could assume that William Smith must have died before that time. That being the case and the fact that it is assumed his first child was born about 1789 there is a possibility that he could have been between 55 and 60 years old when he died. There must be some kind of record somewhere about his death. What is also strange is that after his son James married Appoline Maloney their descendants are then found in the Notre Dame de la Salette, Québec. This is at the opposite end of the “world” for them at that time. Strange that they would move to such a far away place during those days.There must be a GOOD reason for this to have happened! Just to trace some events, the following is just a scenario: –William Smith marries Catherine Black around 1789 –son James born around 1789 marries Appoline 28/10/1813 in Gaspé (22 yrs old at his marriage) –son Thomas born 21/5/1834 Grande Rivière marries Vitaline Lemieux 13/9/1859 in Douglastown, Gaspé (25 yrs old at time of his marriage) Now the strange part comes in: –son Louis born 13/8/1862 (place not mentioned, but presume Douglastown). He marries Délia Lefebvre in Notre Dame de la Salette 9 Nov 1891 (29 yrs old at his marriage). So Louis travelled all the way from Gaspé to Notre Dame de la Salette. Did he come alone or did he bring family members with him. If so, who? Or did his father (Thomas) move himself with his whole family to Notre Dame de la Salette where Louis grew up and later courted and married Délia Lefebvre? Children of William SMITH and Catherine BLACK James SMITH+ b. 1787, d. 26 Jan 1847 William (Guillaume) SMITH+ b. 15 Jul 1790 Jean SMITH b. 26 Sep 1792 Denis SMITH b. 26 Oct 1793 Charlotte SMITH b. 6 May 1796, d. 25 Sep 1818 Jean SMITH+ b. Dec 1798 Catherine BLACK b. 1760 Relationship=3rd great-grandmother of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Catherine BLACK was born in 1760. She married William SMITH, son of (?) SMITH, circa 1786. She married Jacques VANTOU, son of Jacques VANTOU and Elisabeth GAUDIFRY, on 9 September 1822 in Percé, QC, Canada. Research Notes: Drouin (Bleu) books record a marriage in Bathurst New Brunswick between a Thomas Smith and a Jane Black on 12 May 1845. Both have no parents indicated. Thomas is from Caraquet N.B. and Jane from Saumarez? Could she be related to Catherine Black? In the St.Catharines, Ontario library, while there on a personal visit I came across an interesting discovery in the 1817 Census Return of the Canso area of Nova Scotia. In this return William Smith (Black), widow, is listed. The Census reads as follows: A. Men above the age of 50: nil B. Men between the age of 16 & 50: 2 (This could be Denis & Jean) C. Boys: nil D. Woman: 2 (This could be Charlotte, her mother and someone else) E. Girls: nil (probably because Charlotte and others were above 16) F. Total number of persons: 5 G. English: Empty field H. Scotch: Empty field I: Irish: Empty field J: Acadians: 4 (This is interesting, as Catherine Black probably would not consider herself as Acadian as she was, presumably, not born in Acadia. Therefore the 3 other children were born more than likely in Gaspe and are considered as Acadians. The other children, namely, James, William and John were already grown up and more than likely living elsewhere on their own. James was married in 1813, and the other two, William and John married later on in 1822. The following was received in an e-mail from John Le Garignon on 13 Nov 2004: At Douglastown, Monday 18th, Sept. 1809 Court No.116 Continued from 1808 page 21 Widow Catherine Smith of Grand Grave Plaintiff, And… Leonard Massy fisherman of lndian Cove ……Defendant Cause called parties appear Evidence. James Ventonbury called as a Witness by the Plaintiff and Sworn Deposeth says that in spring 1807 one Peter Cloutier came into the service of the Plaintiff as a shore man in the summer fishery and continued so to serve her for the span of three months being the summer fishery and that he the said Peter Cloutier be not withstanding he being a shore man only he did sometimes go to serve in company with the Plaintiff’s son William in order to fish, on account of one Allan McDonald being unable to go out with the Plaintiffs Son from occasional intoxication and that the fish thus caught were kept in a pile by itself and altogether separate from the pile of fish got by the Plaintiff’s Voyage with the said McDonald and likewise separate from the pile of fish got in the Plaintiff’s voyage along with the witness that the whole of the fish so caught by the said Cloutier and the Plaintiffs said son were weighed out twenty or twenty one quintals at the end of the summer fishing and then delivered to the Defendant personally who received the same upon the Plaintiff’s beach, that the said Peter Cloutier was not then present and that the witness understands he had no share in that quantity of fish being entirely on monthly wages that the witness himself was present when the said Cloutier received from the Plaintiff in part of these wages four gallons good oyl and a grindstone worth about ten shillings – and that the Plaintiff’s said son William was allowed by his mother the Plaintiff one third of the aforesaid quantity caught with Cloutier. And the Witness says the whole of the twenty one quintals aforesaid were received by Mr. Masy the Defendant and carried away by him in his own coat, and the witness further saith that he understood thereafter that the Plaintiff’s son William had been satisfied for his share of the aforesaid quantity by the Defendent And the witness further saith that the pile of fish; aforesaid which was got in the Plaintiff’s Voyage along with him amonts to one hundred and forty seven quintals in all and that the same was altogether different and distinct horn the aforesaid number of twenty or twenty one quintals aforesaid which formed a pile of itself as the voyage of the Plaintiff along with the said Cloutier – that the witness does not know the number of quintals that were in the Pile of the Plaintiff’s voyage with the said McDonald but he is certain that the said pile was altogether different and distinct from the aforesaid piles – being cross examined by the Defendant wheter or not he had granted in the presence of the witness any things to the Plaintiff for the said pile of the voyage of the Plaintiff with Cloutier and he the Witness saith that he the Defendant did not grant any such receipt in his presence, the Witness adds that he is not in any way interested in the event of this suit, and is at present in the employ of Mr. Rossignol. The Defendant moves the court that as the aforesaid Peter Cloutier is now absent and out of the jurisdiction of this court and living in the Parish of St. Thomas near to Québec being he considers a material witness in this cause therefore he prays that a Writ of Commission Rogatoire be granted on behalf of him the Defendant directed to a judge or Magistrat within the District of Québec for the examination on oath Faits et Articles of his the said Pierre Cloutier as to the fact of his having so fished in manner set forth by the aforesaid Witness James Vinton with the Plaintiff’s said son William and caught thereby in all the aforesaid quantity of twenty or twenty one quintals of fish and that the said Writ of Commission Rogatoire be retournable on the first day of the now next to be held at Douglastown. It is ordered that the Writ of Commission Rogatoire as prayed for by the Defendant in this cause be granted and that in the meantime the same to remain over until the first day of the now next to be held here. Fr, Robichau …. Clerk of Court WM Crawford Judge …… Court inferior District of Gaspé. John Le Garignon. Children of Catherine BLACK and William SMITH James SMITH+ b. 1787, d. 26 Jan 1847 William (Guillaume) SMITH+ b. 15 Jul 1790 Jean SMITH b. 26 Sep 1792 Denis SMITH b. 26 Oct 1793 Charlotte SMITH b. 6 May 1796, d. 25 Sep 1818 Jean SMITH+ b. Dec 1798 William (Guillaume) SMITH b. 15 July 1790 William (Guillaume) SMITH|b. 15 Jul 1790|p6.htm#i394|William SMITH|b. c 1758|p6.htm#i392|Catherine BLACK|b. 1760|p6.htm#i393|(?) SMITH||p320.htm#i22395|||||||||| Relationship=2nd great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. William (Guillaume) SMITH was born on 15 July 1790 in Percé, QC, Canada. He was the son of William SMITH and Catherine BLACK. He married Louise (Angèle) BOND, daughter of Joseph Jacques BOND and Marie KEMLEUR dit LAFLAMME, on 24 September 1822 in Percé, QC. Children of William (Guillaume) SMITH and Louise (Angèle) BOND Guillaume SMITH b. 1 Jul 1823 Charlotte SMITH b. 20 Oct 1824 Jean SMITH b. December 1798 Jean SMITH|b. Dec 1798|p6.htm#i395|William SMITH|b. c 1758|p6.htm#i392|Catherine BLACK|b. 1760|p6.htm#i393|(?) SMITH||p320.htm#i22395|||||||||| Relationship=2nd great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Jean SMITH was born in December 1798 in NL, Canada. He was the son of William SMITH and Catherine BLACK. He was baptized on 29 October 1808 in Grande-Grave, QC, Canada. He married Marie Sophie THIVIERGE, daughter of François THIVIERGE and Marie Magdeleine LABERGE, on 30 September 1822 in Montmagny, QC, Canada. He married Marguerite BOYCE circa 1829. Research Notes: In “Les Registres de Bonaventure”(1981) by Bona Arsenault, page 305 it says: “Jean Smith de Guillaume Smith & Catherine BLAKE (de Grand-Grave) né à Terreneuve en 1798, baptisé Grand-Grave 20 Oct 1808”. Some books say he was born in Newfoundland, but there is no proof of this. It is possible that Bonavista, Newfoundland and Bonaventure, Gaspe could have been mixed up and there lays the confusion. Children of Jean SMITH and Marie Sophie THIVIERGE John SMITH+ b. 23 Aug 1823, d. 22 Mar 1876 Charlotte SMITH b. 8 Aug 1824 Magloire SMITH+ b. 12 Nov 1825 Sophia SMITH b. 12 May 1827, d. 5 Aug 1883 Pierre SMITH b. 20 Aug 1828, d. 22 Aug 1828 Child of Jean SMITH and Marguerite BOYCE Marguerite SMITH b. 15 Apr 1830 Denis SMITH b. 26 October 1793 Denis SMITH|b. 26 Oct 1793|p6.htm#i396|William SMITH|b. c 1758|p6.htm#i392|Catherine BLACK|b. 1760|p6.htm#i393|(?) SMITH||p320.htm#i22395|||||||||| Relationship=2nd great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Denis SMITH was born on 26 October 1793 in Percé, QC, Canada. He was the son of William SMITH and Catherine BLACK. Charlotte SMITH b. 6 May 1796, d. 25 September 1818 Charlotte SMITH|b. 6 May 1796nd. 25 Sep 1818|p6.htm#i397|William SMITH|b. c 1758|p6.htm#i392|Catherine BLACK|b. 1760|p6.htm#i393|(?) SMITH||p320.htm#i22395|||||||||| Relationship=2nd great-grandaunt of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Charlotte SMITH was born on 6 May 1796 in Percé, QC, Canada. She was the daughter of William SMITH and Catherine BLACK. She married Germain DION, son of Germain DION and Thérèse FOURNIER, on 15 September 1817 in Percé, QC. She died on 25 September 1818 in Percé, QC, at the age of 22. Jean SMITH b. 26 September 1792 Jean SMITH|b. 26 Sep 1792|p6.htm#i398|William SMITH|b. c 1758|p6.htm#i392|Catherine BLACK|b. 1760|p6.htm#i393|(?) SMITH||p320.htm#i22395|||||||||| Relationship=2nd great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Jean SMITH was born on 26 September 1792 in Percé, QC, Canada. He was the son of William SMITH and Catherine BLACK. James SMITH b. 1787, d. 26 January 1847 James SMITH|b. 1787nd. 26 Jan 1847|p6.htm#i399|William SMITH|b. c 1758|p6.htm#i392|Catherine BLACK|b. 1760|p6.htm#i393|(?) SMITH||p320.htm#i22395|||||||||| Relationship=2nd great-grandfather of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. James SMITH was born in 1787 in Percé, QC, Canada. He was the son of William SMITH and Catherine BLACK. He married Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY, daughter of William MALONEY and Josette BAKER dit BLONDIN, on 24 October 1813 in Douglastown, QC, Canada. He died on 26 January 1847 in Douglastown, QC. He was buried on 28 January 1847 in Douglastown, QC. Biographical Notes: He was married in Percé but it is believed that he and his wife lived in Grande-Rivière. James apparently died before the marriage of his son Thomas. Children of James SMITH and Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY Guillaume SMITH b. 15 Mar 1814 Hélène (Ellen) SMITH b. 17 Mar 1816 Jacques (James) SMITH+ b. 25 Sep 1818, d. 13 Mar 1897 Jean SMITH b. 6 Nov 1820 Thomas SMITH b. 14 Feb 1824, d. 25 Jan 1825 Marie Catherine SMITH+ b. 14 Feb 1826, d. 16 Oct 1897 André SMITH b. 14 Jun 1828 Joseph SMITH+ b. 8 Aug 1830 Thomas SMITH+ b. 21 May 1834 Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY b. 19 August 1792 Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY|b. 19 Aug 1792|p6.htm#i400|William MALONEY|b. c 1765nd. 27 Jul 1810|p116.htm#i8091|Josette BAKER dit BLONDIN|b. c 1767|p116.htm#i8092|||||||Jean BAKER dit BLONDIN|b. c 1743|p116.htm#i8093|Anne DAVID|b. c 1745|p116.htm#i8094| Relationship=2nd great-grandmother of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY was born on 19 August 1792 in Percé, QC, Canada. She was the daughter of William MALONEY and Josette BAKER dit BLONDIN. She married James SMITH, son of William SMITH and Catherine BLACK, on 24 October 1813 in Douglastown, QC, Canada. Children of Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY and James SMITH Guillaume SMITH b. 15 Mar 1814 Hélène (Ellen) SMITH b. 17 Mar 1816 Jacques (James) SMITH+ b. 25 Sep 1818, d. 13 Mar 1897 Jean SMITH b. 6 Nov 1820 Thomas SMITH b. 14 Feb 1824, d. 25 Jan 1825 Marie Catherine SMITH+ b. 14 Feb 1826, d. 16 Oct 1897 André SMITH b. 14 Jun 1828 Joseph SMITH+ b. 8 Aug 1830 Thomas SMITH+ b. 21 May 1834 Guillaume SMITH b. 15 March 1814 Guillaume SMITH|b. 15 Mar 1814|p6.htm#i401|James SMITH|b. 1787nd. 26 Jan 1847|p6.htm#i399|Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY|b. 19 Aug 1792|p6.htm#i400|William SMITH|b. c 1758|p6.htm#i392|Catherine BLACK|b. 1760|p6.htm#i393|William MALONEY|b. c 1765nd. 27 Jul 1810|p116.htm#i8091|Josette BAKER dit BLONDIN|b. c 1767|p116.htm#i8092| Relationship=Great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Guillaume SMITH was born on 15 March 1814 in Grande-Rivière, QC, Canada. He was the son of James SMITH and Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY. Hélène (Ellen) SMITH b. 17 March 1816 Hélène (Ellen) SMITH|b. 17 Mar 1816|p6.htm#i402|James SMITH|b. 1787nd. 26 Jan 1847|p6.htm#i399|Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY|b. 19 Aug 1792|p6.htm#i400|William SMITH|b. c 1758|p6.htm#i392|Catherine BLACK|b. 1760|p6.htm#i393|William MALONEY|b. c 1765nd. 27 Jul 1810|p116.htm#i8091|Josette BAKER dit BLONDIN|b. c 1767|p116.htm#i8092| Relationship=Great-grandaunt of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Hélène (Ellen) SMITH was born on 17 March 1816 in Grande-Rivière, QC, Canada. She was the daughter of James SMITH and Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY. She married Thomas ENGLISH, son of John ENGLISH and Mary HEELY, on 7 July 1833 in Percé, QC, Canada. Jacques (James) SMITH b. 25 September 1818, d. 13 March 1897 Jacques (James) SMITH|b. 25 Sep 1818nd. 13 Mar 1897|p6.htm#i403|James SMITH|b. 1787nd. 26 Jan 1847|p6.htm#i399|Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY|b. 19 Aug 1792|p6.htm#i400|William SMITH|b. c 1758|p6.htm#i392|Catherine BLACK|b. 1760|p6.htm#i393|William MALONEY|b. c 1765nd. 27 Jul 1810|p116.htm#i8091|Josette BAKER dit BLONDIN|b. c 1767|p116.htm#i8092| Relationship=Great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Jacques (James) SMITH was born on 25 September 1818 in Grande-Rivière, QC, Canada. He was the son of James SMITH and Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY. He married Mary EVE, daughter of Jacques Thomas EVE and Marie Olive BOND, on 28 October 1848 in Grande-Rivière, QC. He died on 13 March 1897 at the age of 78. Children of Jacques (James) SMITH and Mary EVE Joseph SMITH b. 1849 André SMITH b. 4 Sep 1857 Emélie SMITH b. c 1858 Marcel Ferdinand SMITH+ b. 16 Oct 1859, d. 6 Aug 1935 James SMITH b. 30 Sep 1861 Marie Anne (Mary) SMITH+ b. 8 Jul 1863 François-Xavier SMITH b. 1 Mar 1866 Victoire SMITH b. 22 Dec 1867 Sarah SMITH b. 28 Aug 1870, d. 18 Aug 1879 Jean Edmond (John) SMITH b. 7 Oct 1874, d. 1 Jul 1933 Jean SMITH b. 6 November 1820 Jean SMITH|b. 6 Nov 1820|p6.htm#i404|James SMITH|b. 1787nd. 26 Jan 1847|p6.htm#i399|Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY|b. 19 Aug 1792|p6.htm#i400|William SMITH|b. c 1758|p6.htm#i392|Catherine BLACK|b. 1760|p6.htm#i393|William MALONEY|b. c 1765nd. 27 Jul 1810|p116.htm#i8091|Josette BAKER dit BLONDIN|b. c 1767|p116.htm#i8092| Relationship=Great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Jean SMITH was born on 6 November 1820 in Grande-Rivière, QC, Canada. He was the son of James SMITH and Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY. Research Notes: Drouin books have a record of a John Smith from Grand Grave (no parents mentioned) who married Elizabeth Degaris (no parents mentioned) in Gaspe on 30 Aug 1852. Could this be the same as Jean Smith son of James Smith and Appoline Maloney? It is conceivable that if it is Jean Smith (born 1820) he could easily have married 32 years later. John BAKER b. 7 May 1851, d. 17 October 1930 John BAKER|b. 7 May 1851nd. 17 Oct 1930|p6.htm#i405|John BAKER|b. c 1820nd. 30 Sep 1866|p114.htm#i7973|Marie Catherine SMITH|b. 14 Feb 1826nd. 16 Oct 1897|p6.htm#i407|William BAKER|b. c 1795|p114.htm#i7974|Susan BEAUDIN|b. c 1799|p114.htm#i7975|James SMITH|b. 1787nd. 26 Jan 1847|p6.htm#i399|Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY|b. 19 Aug 1792|p6.htm#i400| Relationship=1st cousin 2 times removed of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. John BAKER was born on 7 May 1851 in Douglastown, QC, Canada. He was the son of John BAKER and Marie Catherine SMITH, and was baptized on 1 September 1852 in St.Patrick, Douglastown, QC, Canada, Godparents: Magloire Smith & Ellen Smith. He died on 17 October 1930 in Preston Springs Hotel, Preston, ON, Canada, at the age of 79. He was buried on 22 October 1930 in Gaspé, QC, Canada. Thomas SMITH b. 14 February 1824, d. 25 January 1825 Thomas SMITH|b. 14 Feb 1824nd. 25 Jan 1825|p6.htm#i406|James SMITH|b. 1787nd. 26 Jan 1847|p6.htm#i399|Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY|b. 19 Aug 1792|p6.htm#i400|William SMITH|b. c 1758|p6.htm#i392|Catherine BLACK|b. 1760|p6.htm#i393|William MALONEY|b. c 1765nd. 27 Jul 1810|p116.htm#i8091|Josette BAKER dit BLONDIN|b. c 1767|p116.htm#i8092| Relationship=Great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Thomas SMITH was born on 14 February 1824 in Grande-Rivière, QC, Canada. He was the son of James SMITH and Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY. He died on 25 January 1825 in Grande-Rivière, QC, at the age of 0. Marie Catherine SMITH b. 14 February 1826, d. 16 October 1897 Marie Catherine SMITH|b. 14 Feb 1826nd. 16 Oct 1897|p6.htm#i407|James SMITH|b. 1787nd. 26 Jan 1847|p6.htm#i399|Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY|b. 19 Aug 1792|p6.htm#i400|William SMITH|b. c 1758|p6.htm#i392|Catherine BLACK|b. 1760|p6.htm#i393|William MALONEY|b. c 1765nd. 27 Jul 1810|p116.htm#i8091|Josette BAKER dit BLONDIN|b. c 1767|p116.htm#i8092| Relationship=Great-grandaunt of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Marie Catherine SMITH was born on 14 February 1826 in Cap-aux-Os, QC, Canada. She was the daughter of James SMITH and Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY, and was baptized on 16 June 1826 in St.Patrick, Douglastown, QC, Canada, Godparents: Antoine Cassivi & Angélique O’Connor. She married John BAKER, son of William BAKER and Susan BEAUDIN, on 2 October 1847 in Douglastown, QC. She died on 16 October 1897 in Gaspé, QC, Canada, at the age of 71. She was buried in October 1897 in St-Albert Cemetery, Gaspé, QC, Canada. Children of Marie Catherine SMITH and John BAKER William BAKER+ b. 15 Jul 1848 James BAKER b. 11 Jan 1850 John BAKER b. 7 May 1851, d. 17 Oct 1930 André SMITH b. 14 June 1828 André SMITH|b. 14 Jun 1828|p6.htm#i408|James SMITH|b. 1787nd. 26 Jan 1847|p6.htm#i399|Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY|b. 19 Aug 1792|p6.htm#i400|William SMITH|b. c 1758|p6.htm#i392|Catherine BLACK|b. 1760|p6.htm#i393|William MALONEY|b. c 1765nd. 27 Jul 1810|p116.htm#i8091|Josette BAKER dit BLONDIN|b. c 1767|p116.htm#i8092| Relationship=Great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. André SMITH was born on 14 June 1828 in Grande-Rivière, QC, Canada. He was the son of James SMITH and Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY. Joseph SMITH b. 8 August 1830 Joseph SMITH|b. 8 Aug 1830|p6.htm#i409|James SMITH|b. 1787nd. 26 Jan 1847|p6.htm#i399|Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY|b. 19 Aug 1792|p6.htm#i400|William SMITH|b. c 1758|p6.htm#i392|Catherine BLACK|b. 1760|p6.htm#i393|William MALONEY|b. c 1765nd. 27 Jul 1810|p116.htm#i8091|Josette BAKER dit BLONDIN|b. c 1767|p116.htm#i8092| Relationship=Great-granduncle of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Joseph SMITH was born on 8 August 1830 in Grande-Rivière, QC, Canada. He was the son of James SMITH and Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY. He married Marguerite PROVOST, daughter of William PROVOST and Marguerite TAYLOR, on 8 September 1858 in Douglastown, QC, Canada. Children of Joseph SMITH and Marguerite PROVOST Rose Ann SMITH b. 19 Feb 1875 Virginie Marguerite SMITH b. 8 Aug 1877 Thomas SMITH b. 21 May 1834 Thomas SMITH|b. 21 May 1834|p6.htm#i410|James SMITH|b. 1787nd. 26 Jan 1847|p6.htm#i399|Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY|b. 19 Aug 1792|p6.htm#i400|William SMITH|b. c 1758|p6.htm#i392|Catherine BLACK|b. 1760|p6.htm#i393|William MALONEY|b. c 1765nd. 27 Jul 1810|p116.htm#i8091|Josette BAKER dit BLONDIN|b. c 1767|p116.htm#i8092| Relationship=Great-grandfather of Théodore Gilbert Ronald CHENIER. Thomas SMITH was born on 21 May 1834 in Grande-Rivière, QC, Canada. He was the son of James SMITH and Marie (Mary) Appoline MALONEY. He married Vitaline LEMIEUX, daughter of Louis Hyacinthe LEMIEUX and Adelaide FORTIN, on 13 September 1859 in Douglastown, QC, Canada. Children of Thomas SMITH and Vitaline LEMIEUX Thomas SMITH b. 7 Nov 1861, d. a 1901 Louis SMITH+ b. 13 Aug 1862, d. 13 Apr 1929 William SMITH+ b. 22 Aug 1865 Mary Jane (Ann) SMITH b. 1866, d. Apr 1914 John SMITH+ b. 30 Oct 1868 Isaac SMITH+ b. 15 Au
      • Renee says:

        http://www.geni.com/people/Nicolas-Chesnay-dit-Lagarenne-Sieur-de-la-Haye/6000000003704225094

        Nicolas Chesnay (Chesnay dit Lagarenne), Sieur de la Haye (c.1620 – 1683

        http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_de_La_Haye

        http://genforum.genealogy.com/lenoir/messages/540.html
        GREAT message at link above.
        snip~

        Hello Ruth,
        The extracts which I’ve posted were found in Allan Lenoir Poe’s papers amoung thousands of papers regarding the Lenoir family. I’ve been trying to organize them for over a year now and have only made a dent. These “extracts” are typed papers simply entitled “Extract from Philippe Le Noir’s Genealogy” and state that they were “translated from the original text by N. M. Lenoir. The punctuation has been respected.” Allan was a very noted historian and genealogists and researched hundreds of families upon request (I’m just now getting family files organized).

        I am assuming, but feel strongly that this is the same Philippe LeNoir who was the Pastor of Blain Parish near Nantes from 1651. My reasoning is this: In his book “Happy Valley” published in 1940, Thomas Felix Hickerson goes into great detail about the life of Philippe LeNoir. Hickerson and Allan corresponded numerous times by mail (I have these originals) in regards to the Lenoir family. Although I’ve not found as of yet anything on Philippe in these letters, I do know that Allan (although very young at the time) was a major source for much of the Lenoir information in Happy Valley. Allan wrote Hickerson a very lengthy letter regarding hundreds of corrections needed to be made to Happy Valley after the book was published. A partial list of these corrections appears in Hickerson’s second bood “Echoes of Happy Valley” published in 1962.

        In Happy Valley Hickerson quotes “Extracts from a biographical sketch of Phillippe Le Noir by B. Vaurigaud, pastor of the Reformed Church and president of the Consistory of Nantes”. You may have Happy Valley, if not I’ll quote a little of B. Vaurigaud’s writing here:

        “Philippe LeNoir, sieur de Crevain, was the son of Guy LeNoir, sieur de Crevain, pastor at la Roche-Bernard, and of Anne de la Haye. This relationship is established by the register itself of the Protestants of Blain, deposed at the registry of Savenay, and in which we read, at the date of the 26th of May, 1652: Marriage of Philippe LeNoir, pastor of the church at Blain, son of Guy LeNoir and Anne de la Haye, with Anne Henriet, daughter of Pierre Henriet and Gabrielle Fournier, by Mr. Gautron, pastor of the church at Rennes.”

        In regards to the Edict of Nantes which prohibited pastors from public preaching there is reference to a sermon preached which states “the sermon had been preached by Philippe Le Noir. Jacques Fremon, squire, sieur de Bouffay, and counselor at the presidial of Nantes, was entrusted with the continuation of the case, and rendered the following decision: Having considered everything, we have, by our sentence and judgment, ordered that the named Le Noir, heretofore minister at Blain, shall be taken and physically apprehended, placed and constituted as a prisoner in the royal prisons of Le Bouffay at Nantes. This sentencee was served at the noble house of la Massays, where the said Le Noir was living. They searched there in vain. The servants, having been questioned, had replied that he had been gone for 15 days and that they did not know what could have become of him. The house was carefully gone through; and as no other place where he lived was known, it was necessary for them to give up the pursuit. All these details have been consigned to a legal file, which is to be found at the archives of the clerk of the court’s office at Nantes.”

        “Confronted with such a pressing danger, Crevain [referring, of course, to Philippe Le Noir] had to do as a great number of his brothers did, and in spite of his age, to take the road to exile. It was in Holland that he sought refuge. The synod of 1686 (September), having learned what M. Le Noir, minister at Blain, in Britanny, had been suffering in France and elsewhere, in order to console him as much as possible has declared him worthy of making an appeal, and has praised his conduct and has approved all that he has done for the church at Hown.”

        This surely is the Philippe Lenoir your researching and due to the frequent correspondences and Hickerson’s reliance on Allan for details I conclude that the “extracts” which I’ve posted from Allan’s papers are in regard to the same Philippe. What do you think?

        I apologize for writing a book here and hope I’ve not bored you with information you already have. I have several letters here written in French which I plan to have translated as I understand none of it. Hopefully something interesting will surface. That’s about all I have as far as a source. Hope it helps.

        http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMAN%20NOBILITY.htm

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Happy_Valley_set

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Josslyn_Hay,_22nd_Earl_of_Erroll

        • Renee says:

          http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/3/30711.htm
          Adalard DE NANTES seigneur de Loches, la Haye & Villentrois

          Lambert II DE NANTES comte de Herbauges
          (Abt 783-852)
          Theodrate DE VERMANDOIS
          (Abt 794-836)
          Leutaud DE FÉZENSAC Comte de Paris
          (786-)
          Grimeut D’ AQUITAINE Countess of Paris
          (-)

          Cte Warner DE NANTES
          (Abt 808-852)

          Miss DE PARIS
          (Abt 808-)

          Adalard DE NANTES seigneur de Loches, la Haye & Villentrois
          (Abt 825-After 864)

          LAMBERT_GILLette **********
          WARNER***
          Varner***

          Grimeut D’ AQUITAINE Countess of Paris

          Cte Warner DE NANTES

          Soundex Code for Loches = L220
          Other surnames sharing this Soundex Code:
          LACHS | LAESSIG | LAYCOCK | LICAUSI | LUCAS | LUKACS | LYSIAK |

          Renee says:
          November 8, 2012 at 6:21 am
          http://thepeerage.com/p1594.htm
          Thomas Manners-Sutton, 1st Baron Manners of Foston1
          M, #15931, b. 24 February 1756, d. 31 May 1842

          Thomas Manners-Sutton, 1st Baron Manners of Foston|b. 24 Feb 1756\nd. 31 May 1842|p1594.htm#i15931|Lord George Manners-Sutton|b. 8 Mar 1723\nd. 7 Jan 1783|p1591.htm#i15907|Diana Chaplin|d. 13 May 1767|p1591.htm#i15908|John Manners, 3rd Duke of Rutland|b. 21 Oct 1696\nd. 29 May 1779|p1349.htm#i13483|Bridget Sutton|d. 16 Jun 1734|p1529.htm#i15282|Thomas Chaplin|b. 1684\nd. 17 Jan 1747|p1841.htm#i18406|Diana Archer||p2863.htm#i28623|

          Last Edited=14 Dec 2011
          Thomas Manners-Sutton, 1st Baron Manners of Foston was born on 24 February 1756.3 He was the son of Lord George Manners-Sutton and Diana Chaplin.2 He married Anne Copley, daughter of Sir Joseph Copley, 1st Bt. and Mary Buller, on 4 November 1803.1 He married Jane Butler, daughter of James Butler, 9th Baron Caher and Sarah Nichols, on 28 October 1815.4 He died on 31 May 1842 at age 86.
          He was barrister Lincoln’s , Commissioner of Bankrupts 1783, Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Tory) Newark 1796–1805, Ch Justice N Wales 1797–1802, Slr-Gen to PRINCE OF WALES 1800 and GB 1802–05, knighted 1802, a Baron Exchequer 1805–07, Lord Chllr Ireland 1 Inn 1775.3 He was County Lincoln (UK).3 He was educated Charterhouse and Emmanuel College Cambridge.3 He gained the title of 1st Baron Manners of Foston. He was King’s Counsel (K.C.) in 1800.3 On 20 April 1807 so created.3 He was Privy Counsellor (P.C.) (GB April I ) in May 1807.3
          Child of Thomas Manners-Sutton, 1st Baron Manners of Foston and Jane Butler
          John Thomas Manners-Sutton+2 b. 17 Aug 1818, d. 14 Nov 1864
          Citations
          [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 983. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
          [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
          [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition, volume 2, page 2592.
          [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition, volume 1, page 2592.
          Louisa Bridget Manners-Sutton1
          F, #15932, d. 5 February 1800

          Louisa Bridget Manners-Sutton|d. 5 Feb 1800|p1594.htm#i15932|Lord George Manners-Sutton|b. 8 Mar 1723\nd. 7 Jan 1783|p1591.htm#i15907|Diana Chaplin|d. 13 May 1767|p1591.htm#i15908|John Manners, 3rd Duke of Rutland|b. 21 Oct 1696\nd. 29 May 1779|p1349.htm#i13483|Bridget Sutton|d. 16 Jun 1734|p1529.htm#i15282|Thomas Chaplin|b. 1684\nd. 17 Jan 1747|p1841.htm#i18406|Diana Archer||p2863.htm#i28623|

          Last Edited=27 Jun 2007
          Louisa Bridget Manners-Sutton was the daughter of Lord George Manners-Sutton and Diana Chaplin.1 She married Edward Lockwood-Perceval, son of Reverend Edward Lockwood and Lucy Dowdeswell, on 15 June 1790.1 She died on 5 February 1800.1
          Her married name became Lockwood-Perceval.
          Child of Louisa Bridget Manners-Sutton and Edward Lockwood-Perceval
          George Harvey Lockwood-Perceval1 b. 1 Feb 1793, d. 11 Nov 1815
          Citations
          [S21] L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 169. Hereinafter cited as The New Extinct Peerage.
          Charlotte Manners-Sutton1
          F, #15933, d. 1827

          Charlotte Manners-Sutton|d. 1827|p1594.htm#i15933|Lord George Manners-Sutton|b. 8 Mar 1723\nd. 7 Jan 1783|p1591.htm#i15907|Diana Chaplin|d. 13 May 1767|p1591.htm#i15908|John Manners, 3rd Duke of Rutland|b. 21 Oct 1696\nd. 29 May 1779|p1349.htm#i13483|Bridget Sutton|d. 16 Jun 1734|p1529.htm#i15282|Thomas Chaplin|b. 1684\nd. 17 Jan 1747|p1841.htm#i18406|Diana Archer||p2863.htm#i28623|

          Last Edited=5 May 2008
          Charlotte Manners-Sutton was the daughter of Lord George Manners-Sutton and Diana Chaplin.1 She married Thomas Lockwood, son of Thomas Lockwood and Bridget Morris, on 16 June 1789.1 She died in 1827.
          From 16 June 1789, her married name became Lockwood.1
          Child of Charlotte Manners-Sutton and Thomas Lockwood
          Robert Manners Lockwood1 d. 28 Nov 1865
          Citations
          [S21] L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 169. Hereinafter cited as The New Extinct Peerage.
          Edward Lockwood-Perceval1
          M, #15934, d. 6 July 1804

          Edward Lockwood-Perceval|d. 6 Jul 1804|p1594.htm#i15934|Reverend Edward Lockwood|b. 6 Jan 1720\nd. 22 Jan 1802|p3061.htm#i30602|Lucy Dowdeswell||p23593.htm#i235922|Richard Lockwood|b. 1672\nd. 30 Aug 1756|p23591.htm#i235908|Matilda Vernon||p23591.htm#i235909|Reverend William Dowdeswell||p23593.htm#i235923||||

          Last Edited=4 Apr 2010

          Edward Lockwood-Perceval 2 Edward Lockwood-Perceval was the son of Reverend Edward Lockwood and Lucy Dowdeswell.1 He married Louisa Bridget Manners-Sutton, daughter of Lord George Manners-Sutton and Diana Chaplin, on 15 June 1790.1 He died on 6 July 1804.1
          He was educated between 1773 and 1779 at Westminster School, Westminster, London, England.1 He graduated from University College, Oxford University, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England, in 1783 with a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.).1 He graduated from All Souls’ College, Oxford University, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England, in 1786 with a Bachelor of Civil Law (B.C.L.).1 He lived at Bishop’s Hall, Essex, England.
          Child of Edward Lockwood-Perceval and Louisa Bridget Manners-Sutton
          George Harvey Lockwood-Perceval1 b. 1 Feb 1793, d. 11 Nov 1815
          Citations
          [S21] L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 169. Hereinafter cited as The New Extinct Peerage.
          [S3409] Caroline Maubois, “re: Penancoet Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as “re: Penancoet Family.”
          Thomas Lockwood1
          M, #15935

          Thomas Lockwood||p1594.htm#i15935|Thomas Lockwood|b. c 1724\nd. 15 May 1805|p1842.htm#i18415|Bridget Morris||p23592.htm#i235918|Richard Lockwood|b. 1672\nd. 30 Aug 1756|p23591.htm#i235908|Matilda Vernon||p23591.htm#i235909|Robert Morris||p23592.htm#i235919||||

          Last Edited=19 Jun 2008
          Thomas Lockwood was the son of Thomas Lockwood and Bridget Morris.1 He married Charlotte Manners-Sutton, daughter of Lord George Manners-Sutton and Diana Chaplin, on 16 June 1789.1
          He lived at Dan-y-graig, Glamorgan, Wales.1
          Child of Thomas Lockwood and Charlotte Manners-Sutton
          Robert Manners Lockwood1 d. 28 Nov 1865
          Citations
          [S21] L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 169. Hereinafter cited as The New Extinct Peerage.

          Mary Manners-Sutton1
          F, #15936, d. 20 November 1829

          Mary Manners-Sutton|d. 20 Nov 1829|p1594.htm#i15936|Lord George Manners-Sutton|b. 8 Mar 1723\nd. 7 Jan 1783|p1591.htm#i15907|Mary Peart||p1591.htm#i15909|John Manners, 3rd Duke of Rutland|b. 21 Oct 1696\nd. 29 May 1779|p1349.htm#i13483|Bridget Sutton|d. 16 Jun 1734|p1529.htm#i15282|Joshua Peart||p1842.htm#i18416||||

          Last Edited=5 May 2008
          Mary Manners-Sutton was the daughter of Lord George Manners-Sutton and Mary Peart.1 She married Reverend Richard Lockwood in 1799.1 She died on 20 November 1829.
          Her married name became Lockwood.
          Citations
          [S21] L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 51. Hereinafter cited as The New Extinct Peerage.
          Reverend Richard Lockwood1
          M, #15937, d. 1830

          Last Edited=7 Dec 2004
          Reverend Richard Lockwood married Mary Manners-Sutton, daughter of Lord George Manners-Sutton and Mary Peart, in 1799.1 He died in 1830.
          He lived at Fifield, Essex, England.
          Citations
          [S21] L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 51. Hereinafter cited as The New Extinct Peerage.
          Charles Manners-Sutton, 1st Viscount Canterbury1
          M, #15938, b. 29 January 1780, d. 21 July 1845

          Charles Manners-Sutton, 1st Viscount Canterbury|b. 29 Jan 1780\nd. 21 Jul 1845|p1594.htm#i15938|Most Rev. Charles Manners-Sutton|b. 17 Feb 1755\nd. 21 Jul 1828|p1053.htm#i10524|Mary Thoroton|d. 10 Mar 1832|p1591.htm#i15906|Lord George Manners-Sutton|b. 8 Mar 1723\nd. 7 Jan 1783|p1591.htm#i15907|Diana Chaplin|d. 13 May 1767|p1591.htm#i15908|Thomas Thoroton||p1841.htm#i18408||||

          Last Edited=20 Feb 2011
          Charles Manners-Sutton, 1st Viscount Canterbury was born on 29 January 1780 at Screveton, Nottinghamshire, England.2 He was the son of Most Rev. Charles Manners-Sutton and Mary Thoroton.1 He married, firstly, Lucy Maria Charlotte Denison, daughter of John Denison and Maria Charlotte Horlock, on 8 July 1811 at Lambeth Palace, Lambeth, London, England.3 He married, secondly, Ellen Power, daughter of Edmund Power, on 6 December 1828 at St. George’s Church, St. George Street, Hanover Square, London, England.3 He died on 21 July 1845 at age 65 at Southwick Crescent, Paddington, London, England, from apoplexy.3 He was buried at Addington, Buckinghamshire, England.3 His will was probated on 16 February 1846.3
          He was educated at Eton College, Windsor, Berkshire, England.2 He graduated from Trinity College, Cambridge University, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England, in 1802 with a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.).2 He was admitted to Lincoln’s Inn in 1805 entitled to practice as a Barrister.2 He graduated from Trinity College, Cambridge University, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England, in 1805 with a Master of Arts (M.A.).2 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Tory) for Scarborough between 1806 and 1832.2 He held the office of Bencher of Lincoln’s Inn.2 He held the office of Judge Advocate-General between 1809 and 1817.2 He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) on 8 November 1809.2 He held the office of Speaker of the House of Commons between June 1817 and December 1834.1 He was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws (LL.D.) by Trinity College, Cambridge University, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England, in 1824.2 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Tory) for the University of Cambridge between 1832 and 1835.2 He was invested as a Knight Grand Cross, Order of the Bath (G.C.B.) on 31 August 1833.3 He was created 1st Baron Bottesford of Bottesford, co. Leicester [U.K.] on 10 March 1835.1 He was created 1st Viscount Canterbury, of the City of Canterbury [U.K.] on 10 March 1835.1
          Child of Charles Manners-Sutton, 1st Viscount Canterbury and Ellen Power
          Hon. Frances Diana Manners-Sutton+1 d. 1 Jun 1874
          Children of Charles Manners-Sutton, 1st Viscount Canterbury and Lucy Maria Charlotte Denison
          Hon. Charlotte Matilda Manners-Sutton+4 d. 14 May 1898
          Charles John Manners-Sutton, 2nd Viscount Canterbury1 b. 17 Apr 1812, d. 13 Nov 1869
          John Henry Thomas Manners-Sutton, 3rd Viscount Canterbury+1 b. 27 May 1814, d. 24 Jun 1877
          Citations
          [S21] L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 51. Hereinafter cited as The New Extinct Peerage.
          [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 1. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
          [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 2.
          [S21] L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage, page 245.
          Lt.-Col. Francis Manners-Sutton
          M, #15939, b. 5 July 1783, d. 5 March 1825

          Lt.-Col. Francis Manners-Sutton|b. 5 Jul 1783\nd. 5 Mar 1825|p1594.htm#i15939|Most Rev. Charles Manners-Sutton|b. 17 Feb 1755\nd. 21 Jul 1828|p1053.htm#i10524|Mary Thoroton|d. 10 Mar 1832|p1591.htm#i15906|Lord George Manners-Sutton|b. 8 Mar 1723\nd. 7 Jan 1783|p1591.htm#i15907|Diana Chaplin|d. 13 May 1767|p1591.htm#i15908|Thomas Thoroton||p1841.htm#i18408||||

          Last Edited=25 May 2003
          Lt.-Col. Francis Manners-Sutton was born on 5 July 1783. He was the son of Most Rev. Charles Manners-Sutton and Mary Thoroton. He married Mary Oliver, daughter of Laver Oliver, on 27 July 1814. He died on 5 March 1825 at age 41.
          Charlotte Manners-Sutton
          F, #15940, d. 14 February 1825

          Charlotte Manners-Sutton|d. 14 Feb 1825|p1594.htm#i15940|Most Rev. Charles Manners-Sutton|b. 17 Feb 1755\nd. 21 Jul 1828|p1053.htm#i10524|Mary Thoroton|d. 10 Mar 1832|p1591.htm#i15906|Lord George Manners-Sutton|b. 8 Mar 1723\nd. 7 Jan 1783|p1591.htm#i15907|Diana Chaplin|d. 13 May 1767|p1591.htm#i15908|Thomas Thoroton||p1841.htm#i18408||||

          Last Edited=5 May 2008
          Charlotte Manners-Sutton was the daughter of Most Rev. Charles Manners-Sutton and Mary Thoroton. She married Venerable James Croft on 5 October 1812. She died on 14 February 1825.
          Her married name became Croft

  25. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starr_King_School_for_the_Ministry
    The Starr King School for the Ministry is an American Unitarian Universalist (UU) seminary in Berkeley, California and part of the Graduate Theological Union (GTU). The seminary was formed in 1904 to train leaders for the growing number of congregations in the western part of the country. An emphasis on the practical skills of religious leadership and individualized study characterized the school’s transformation-based educational philosophy from the beginning.

    Contents [show]
    1 History
    2 Educational philosophy
    3 Degrees and certificates
    4 Individual courses
    5 Doctorate of Humane Letters
    6 Distinction: Accreditation includes distance learning
    7 Recognized for excellence in Harvard Study
    8 See also
    9 External links

    [edit] HistoryThe school opened in 1904 as the Pacific Unitarian School for the Ministry. With most Unitarian ministers being educated at Harvard Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts and Meadville Theological School in Meadville, Pennsylvania, the new seminary would meet the need to train leaders serving the churches west of the Rocky Mountains. The school held its first classes at the First Unitarian Church of Oakland, moving just a few years later to the City of Berkeley to be closer to other seminaries and the University of California, where students were able to take classes. The first president was Earl Morse Wilbur. In addition to his service to the school for 30 years, he is remembered for writing the first comprehensive histories of European Unitarianism.

    In 1941, the school changed its name to honor Thomas Starr King, minister of the First Unitarian Church of San Francisco. During the Civil War, the popular lecturer and activist spoke zealously in favor of the Union and was credited by Abraham Lincoln with preventing California from becoming a separate republic. In addition, he organized the Pacific Branch of the United States Sanitary Commission, which cared for wounded soldiers and was the predecessor to the American Red Cross. King’s prominence also contributed greatly to the spread of Unitarianism on the West Coast.

    In 1962, local seminaries officially formed the Graduate Theological Union (GTU), a diverse consortium of what now numbers nine theological seminaries, several research centers, affiliates and institutes. Starr King joined the GTU in 1964.

    [edit] Educational philosophyToday, Starr King School for the Ministry educates people for Unitarian Universalist ministry and for progressive religious leadership in society. Its approach to the study of theology is inspired by UU values. It is dedicated to providing student-centered, multi-religious, counter-oppressive graduate education that cultivates multi-religious life and learning, and creates just and sustainable communities.

    Established 1904
    Type Graduate theological seminary
    Religious affiliation Unitarian Universalist Association
    President Rebecca Ann Parker
    Provost Ibrahim Abdurrahman Farajaje
    Dean Gabriella Lettini
    Location Berkeley, California, Unted States
    Former names Pacific Unitarian School for the Ministry
    Nickname Holy Hill, GTU
    Affiliations Graduate Theological Union

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Starr_King

    Thomas Starr King was born on December 17, 1824, in New York City to Rev. Thomas Farrington King, a Universalist minister, and Susan Starr King. The sole support of his family at age 15, he was forced to leave school. Inspired by men like Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry Ward Beecher, King embarked on a program of self-study for the ministry. At the age of 20 he took over his father’s former pulpit at the Charlestown Universalist Church in Charlestown, Massachusetts.

    In 1849 he was appointed pastor of the Hollis Street Church in Boston, where he became one of the most famous preachers in New England. He vacationed in the White Mountains of New Hampshire and in 1859 published a book about the area entitled The White Hills; their Legends, Landscapes, & Poetry. In 1860 he accepted a call from the First Unitarian Church of San Francisco, California.

    Starr King’s younger brother, Edward Starr King, served as captain of the clipper ship Syren. Capt. Starr King arrived in San Francisco aboard Syren just two days after his elder brother’s stirring 1861 speech about Washington and the Union, remarking, “Starr has the brains of the family, and I the brawn.”[1]

    During the Civil War, Starr King spoke zealously in favor of the Union and was credited by Abraham Lincoln with preventing California from becoming a separate republic. In addition, he organized the Pacific Branch of the United States Sanitary Commission, which cared for wounded soldiers and was the predecessor to the American Red Cross. A fiery orator, he raised more than $1.5 million for the Sanitary Commission headquarters in New York, one-fifth of the total contributions from all the states in the Union. The relentless lecture circuit exhausted him, and he died in San Francisco on March 4, 1864, of diphtheria.

    [edit] HonorsMountain peaks in the White Mountains (Mount Starr King, elevation 1,191 m (3,907 ft)) and in Yosemite National Park (Mount Starr King) are named in his honor. In 1941 the Starr King School for the Ministry (Unitarian Universalist), in Berkeley, California, was also renamed in his honor. King’s church and tomb in San Francisco are designated historical monuments. Two streets in the city (Starr King Way, on which the church is located, and King Street in the Mission Bay neighborhood) are named for him, as is the Starr King Openspace, a park in the Potrero Hill neighborhood. There is also a statue of him in Golden Gate Park, facing JFK Drive, quite close to the De Young Museum.[2] There are schools throughout California named and dedicated to him: Starr King Elementary School in San Francisco, Thomas Starr King Middle School in the Silver Lake neighborhood of Los Angeles and Starr King K-8 School in Carmichael, California. A Masonic lodge founded in 1864 in Salem, Massachusetts, bears his name.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amos_Starr_Cooke
    In 1849 Cooke worked for Samuel Northrop Castle who had been a ship-mate on the Mary Frazier as secular supply agent for the mission. As the American Board reduced funding for the Hawaii stations, he co-founded Castle & Cooke as a private company in June 1851. Edward Griffin Beckwith (1826–1909) became the next principal of the Royal School, as it opened to students of all races.[4]

    The business started as a general store, and continued as supply agents to the mission. Their store house is part of the Mission Houses Museum. Cooke made one trip to supply mission stations in the Marshall Islands and Gilbert Islands. In 1858 Cooke became a partner in the Haʻikū Sugar Company on the island of Maui.[5] During the American Civil War in the 1860s, the company became an agent for selling sugar from the sugar plantations in Hawaii to the western United States. However, Cooke’s health declined and he turned over his duties to Joseph Ballard Atherton who had started as a clerk in 1859.[6]

    Cooke died in Honolulu, March 20, 1871. The company went on to be one of the “Big Five” corporations that dominated the economy of the Territory of Hawaii.[6] Their 7 children were:

    Juliette Montague Cooke in 1876Joseph Platt Cooke was born June 15, 1838, married Harriet Emily Wilder (1842–1904), sister of Samuel Garner Wilder, and died August 29, 1879. Their son also named Joseph Platt Cooke (1870–1918) married Maud Mansfield Baldwin (1872–1961), daughter of Henry Perrine Baldwin, co-founder of Alexander & Baldwin.
    Martha Eliza Cooke was born November 21, 1840, married Samuel Thomas Alexander (1836–1904), the other co-founder of Alexander & Baldwin. She died July 6, 1918.
    Juliette Montague Cooke was born August 21, 1843, married Joseph Ballard Atherton (1837–1903) in 1865 and died August 25, 1921. Their daughter Mary Atherton Richards (1869–1951) wrote several histories of the family.[7]
    Mary Annis Cooke was born November 6, 1846, married Charles Turner (1845–1894), and died in 1920.
    Charles Montague Cooke was born May 6, 1849 married Anna Charlotte Rice (1853–1934) on April 30, 1874. He became president of the Bank of Hawaii and C. Brewer & Co.[8] Their children included scientist Charles Montague Cooke, Jr. (1874–1948) and businessman Clarence Hyde Cooke (1876–1944).[9] Son George Paul Cooke married the granddaughter of missionary Gerrit P. Judd, and their son was musician Francis Judd Cooke (1910–1995). He died in 1909.[10]
    Amos Francis “Frank” Cooke was born December 23, 1852, married Lilanet “Lulu” Lydgate (1856–1946) and died in 1931.
    Clarence Warren Cooke was born April 4, 1856 married Clara Lydia Moseley (1857–1941) and died March 4, 1880.

  26. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niihau

    Elizabeth Sinclair purchased Niʻihau in 1864 from the Kingdom of Hawaii and private ownership passed on to her descendants, the Robinson family. During World War II, the island was the site of the Niʻihau Incident: A Japanese navy fighter pilot crashed on the island and terrorized its residents for a week after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The people of Niʻihau are known for their gemlike lei pūpū (shell lei) craftsmanship, and speak Hawaiʻian as a primary language. The island is generally off-limits to all but relatives of the island’s owners, U.S. Navy personnel, government officials and invited guests, giving it the nickname “The Forbidden Isle”. Beginning in 1987, a limited number of supervised activity tours and hunting safaris have opened to tourists. The island is currently managed by Bruce and Keith Robinson.

    https://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2012/09/16/about-that-china-sindrome-again/

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Thomas_Birch,_2nd_Baronet
    Sir Thomas Bernard Birch, 2nd Baronet DL (18 March 1791 – 3 March 1880)[1] was a British baronet and Whig politician.

    He was the only son of Sir Joseph Birch, 1st Baronet and his wife Elizabeth Mary, third daughter of Benjamin Heywood.[2] Birch was educated at Rugby School and went then to Jesus College, Cambridge, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in 1813 and a Master of Arts three years later.[3] In 1817, he was called to the bar by Lincoln’s Inn and in 1833, he succeeded his father as baronet.[4]

    From 1827 Birch was private secretary to William Lamb (later Lord Melbourne) in his capacity as Chief Secretary for Ireland.[5] He was appointed High Sheriff of Lancashire in 1841 and served as a Deputy Lieutenant for that county.[4] In 1847, he entered the British House of Commons in 1847, sitting for Liverpool until 1852.[6]

    Birch was unmarried and childless.[5] With his death the baronetcy became extinct.

    Heywood ?
    Percival ?

    http://thepeerage.com/p35595.htm
    Elizabeth Heywood1
    F, #355941, d. 31 May 1819

    Elizabeth Heywood|d. 31 May 1819|p35595.htm#i355941|Nathaniel Heywood|b. 8 Jul 1759\nd. 2 Apr 1815|p35593.htm#i355927|Ann Percival|d. 13 Jul 1847|p35593.htm#i355929|Benjamin Heywood|b. c 1723\nd. Aug 1795|p35592.htm#i355913|Phoebe Ogden|b. c 1729\nd. 25 May 1810|p35593.htm#i355922|Thomas Percival||p35593.htm#i355928||||

    Last Edited=6 May 2009
    Elizabeth Heywood was the daughter of Nathaniel Heywood and Ann Percival.2 She married Benjamin Heywood Bright on 6 November 1818.1 She died on 31 May 1819, without issue.1
    Her married name became Bright.
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Benjamin Heywood Bright1
    M, #355942

    Last Edited=9 May 2009
    Benjamin Heywood Bright married Elizabeth Heywood, daughter of Nathaniel Heywood and Ann Percival, on 6 November 1818.1
    He lived at Bristol, Gloucestershire, England.1
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Thomas Robinson1
    M, #355943

    Last Edited=9 May 2009
    Thomas Robinson lived at Woodlands, Hampshire, England.1
    Child of Thomas Robinson
    Sophia Ann Robinson+2 d. 25 Aug 1852
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Sophia Ann Robinson1
    F, #355944, d. 25 August 1852

    Sophia Ann Robinson|d. 25 Aug 1852|p35595.htm#i355944|Thomas Robinson||p35595.htm#i355943||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=9 May 2009
    Sophia Ann Robinson was the daughter of Thomas Robinson.2 She married Sir Benjamin Heywood, 1st Bt., son of Nathaniel Heywood and Ann Percival, on 22 October 1816.1 She died on 25 August 1852.1
    From 22 October 1816, her married name became Heywood.
    Children of Sophia Ann Robinson and Sir Benjamin Heywood, 1st Bt.
    Sir Thomas Percival Heywood, 2nd Bt.+2 b. 15 Mar 1823, d. 26 Oct 1897
    Oliver Heywood2 b. 9 Sep 1825, d. 17 Mar 1892
    Arthur Henry Heywood+2 b. 21 Dec 1826, d. 11 Mar 1901
    Edward Stanley Heywood+2 b. 22 Dec 1829, d. 19 Jan 1914
    Reverend Henry Robinson Heywood+2 b. 18 Aug 1833, d. 12 Mar 1895
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Norah Gertrude Sebag-Montefiore1
    F, #355945, b. 1902

    Norah Gertrude Sebag-Montefiore|b. 1902|p35595.htm#i355945|Major Cecil Sebag-Montefiore|b. 14 Oct 1873\nd. 9 Feb 1923|p35572.htm#i355717|Emilia Margaret Raphael|b. 1876\nd. 23 Dec 1942|p35573.htm#i355721|Sir Joseph Sebag-Montefiore|b. 29 Aug 1822\nd. 19 Jan 1903|p35535.htm#i355345|Adelaide Cohen|b. c 1831\nd. Feb 1895|p35449.htm#i354488|George C. Raphael||p35573.htm#i355722||||

    Last Edited=12 Nov 2011
    Norah Gertrude Sebag-Montefiore was born in 1902 at Paddington, London, England.2 She is the daughter of Major Cecil Sebag-Montefiore and Emilia Margaret Raphael.1 She married Captain Geoffrey Thornborrow Bristed, son of Major Richard Bower Bristed and Constance Robinson, on 25 May 1925.1 She and Captain Geoffrey Thornborrow Bristed were divorced.1
    From 25 May 1925, her married name became Bristed.1 She lived in 1965 at 20 St. John’s Road, Sevenoaks, Kent, England.1
    Children of Norah Gertrude Sebag-Montefiore and Captain Geoffrey Thornborrow Bristed
    Richard J. C. Bristed2 b. 1927
    Christabel A. Bristed2 b. 1931
    Susan M. Bristed2 b. 1934
    Citations
    [S35] Peter Townend, editor, Burke’s Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry, 18th edition, 3 volumes (London, England: Burke’s Peerage Ltd, 1965-1972), volume 1, page 507. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Landed Gentry, 18th ed.
    [S4567] Bill Norton, “re: Pitman Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger LUNDY (101053), 6 April 2010 and 19 April 2011. Hereinafter cited as “re: Pitman Family.”

    Oliver Heywood1
    M, #355946, b. 9 September 1825, d. 17 March 1892

    Oliver Heywood|b. 9 Sep 1825\nd. 17 Mar 1892|p35595.htm#i355946|Sir Benjamin Heywood, 1st Bt.|b. 12 Dec 1793\nd. 11 Aug 1865|p35593.htm#i355930|Sophia Ann Robinson|d. 25 Aug 1852|p35595.htm#i355944|Nathaniel Heywood|b. 8 Jul 1759\nd. 2 Apr 1815|p35593.htm#i355927|Ann Percival|d. 13 Jul 1847|p35593.htm#i355929|Thomas Robinson||p35595.htm#i355943||||

    Last Edited=2 May 2011
    Oliver Heywood was born on 9 September 1825.1 He was the son of Sir Benjamin Heywood, 1st Bt. and Sophia Ann Robinson.2 He married Eleanor Barton, daughter of Richard Watson Barton, on 7 September 1847.1 He died on 17 March 1892 at age 66, without issue.1
    He held the office of High Sheriff of Lancashire in 1888.1 He held the office of Justice of the Peace (J.P.) for Lancashire.1 He held the office of Deputy Lieutenant (D.L.) of Lancashire.1
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Richard Watson Barton1
    M, #355947

    Last Edited=3 Apr 2010
    Richard Watson Barton lived at Springwood, Lancashire, England.1
    Child of Richard Watson Barton
    Eleanor Barton2 d. 14 Sep 1877
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Eleanor Barton1
    F, #355948, d. 14 September 1877

    Eleanor Barton|d. 14 Sep 1877|p35595.htm#i355948|Richard Watson Barton||p35595.htm#i355947||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=3 Apr 2010
    Eleanor Barton was the daughter of Richard Watson Barton.2 She married Oliver Heywood, son of Sir Benjamin Heywood, 1st Bt. and Sophia Ann Robinson, on 7 September 1847.1 She died on 14 September 1877.1
    From 7 September 1847, her married name became Heywood.
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Stephen Dempster Heywood1
    M, #355949

    Stephen Dempster Heywood||p35595.htm#i355949|William Dickins Heywood|b. 1880|p35087.htm#i350869|Mabel Dempster|b. 1885|p35087.htm#i350870|Harvey Heywood|b. 1837|p35087.htm#i350866|Harriette Jacobs|b. c 1846|p35087.htm#i350867|John Dempster||p35423.htm#i354224|Mary E. Walker||p35423.htm#i354225|

    Last Edited=29 Jul 2009
    Stephen Dempster Heywood is the son of William Dickins Heywood and Mabel Dempster.1 He married Elizabeth Fielding Mitcheson, daughter of Major Harry Mitcheson.1
    He was educated at Charterhouse School, Godalming, Surrey, England.1 He lived at Peninver, Alderley Edge, Cheshire, England.1
    Citations
    [S3722] Anonymous, “re: Heywood Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger LUNDY (101053), 17 April 2009. Hereinafter cited as “re: Heywood Family.”
    William Langton1
    M, #355950

    Last Edited=9 May 2009
    William Langton lived at The Rookery, Manchester, Lancashire, England.1
    Child of William Langton
    Alice Langton+2 d. 16 Jul 1855

    http://thepeerage.com/p35597.htm#i355961
    Reverend Henry Robinson Heywood1
    M, #355961, b. 18 August 1833, d. 12 March 1895

    Reverend Henry Robinson Heywood|b. 18 Aug 1833\nd. 12 Mar 1895|p35597.htm#i355961|Sir Benjamin Heywood, 1st Bt.|b. 12 Dec 1793\nd. 11 Aug 1865|p35593.htm#i355930|Sophia Ann Robinson|d. 25 Aug 1852|p35595.htm#i355944|Nathaniel Heywood|b. 8 Jul 1759\nd. 2 Apr 1815|p35593.htm#i355927|Ann Percival|d. 13 Jul 1847|p35593.htm#i355929|Thomas Robinson||p35595.htm#i355943||||

    Last Edited=2 May 2011
    Reverend Henry Robinson Heywood was born on 18 August 1833.1 He was the son of Sir Benjamin Heywood, 1st Bt. and Sophia Ann Robinson.2 He married Ella Sophia Gibson, daughter of Reverend William Gibson, on 19 May 1858.1 He died on 12 March 1895 at age 61.1
    He graduated with a Master of Arts (M.A.).3 He was the Vicar at Swinton, Lancashire, England.1 He held the office of Hon. Canon of Manchester.1
    Children of Reverend Henry Robinson Heywood and Ella Sophia Gibson
    Henry Arthur Heywood+2 b. 19 Jun 1859, d. 2 Jul 1943
    Hugh Sumner Heywood2 b. 9 Jun 1860, d. 25 Jul 1871
    Basil Heywood2 b. 2 Mar 1864, d. 2 Mar 1864
    Lt.-Col. Charles Christopher Heywood+2 b. 3 May 1865, d. 10 Mar 1948
    Reverend Geoffrey George Temple Heywood2 b. 3 Nov 1869, d. 3 Jun 1902
    Rt. Rev. Bernard Oliver Francis Heywood+2 b. 1 Mar 1871, d. 13 Mar 1960
    Mary Ella Sophia Heywood2 b. 13 Oct 1876, d. 13 Feb 1931
    Dorothy Katherine Alice Heywood2 b. 22 May 1879, d. 25 Aug 1967
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition, volume 1, page 1902.
    Reverend William Gibson1
    M, #355962

    Last Edited=9 May 2009
    Reverend William Gibson was the Rector at Fawley, Hampshire, England.1
    Child of Reverend William Gibson
    Ella Sophia Gibson+2 d. 15 Aug 1928
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Ella Sophia Gibson1
    F, #355963, d. 15 August 1928

    Ella Sophia Gibson|d. 15 Aug 1928|p35597.htm#i355963|Reverend William Gibson||p35597.htm#i355962||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=9 May 2009
    Ella Sophia Gibson was the daughter of Reverend William Gibson.2 She married Reverend Henry Robinson Heywood, son of Sir Benjamin Heywood, 1st Bt. and Sophia Ann Robinson, on 19 May 1858.1 She died on 15 August 1928.1
    From 19 May 1858, her married name became Heywood.
    Children of Ella Sophia Gibson and Reverend Henry Robinson Heywood
    Henry Arthur Heywood+2 b. 19 Jun 1859, d. 2 Jul 1943
    Hugh Sumner Heywood2 b. 9 Jun 1860, d. 25 Jul 1871
    Basil Heywood2 b. 2 Mar 1864, d. 2 Mar 1864
    Lt.-Col. Charles Christopher Heywood+2 b. 3 May 1865, d. 10 Mar 1948
    Reverend Geoffrey George Temple Heywood2 b. 3 Nov 1869, d. 3 Jun 1902
    Rt. Rev. Bernard Oliver Francis Heywood+2 b. 1 Mar 1871, d. 13 Mar 1960
    Mary Ella Sophia Heywood2 b. 13 Oct 1876, d. 13 Feb 1931
    Dorothy Katherine Alice Heywood2 b. 22 May 1879, d. 25 Aug 1967
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Henry Arthur Heywood1
    M, #355964, b. 19 June 1859, d. 2 July 1943

    Henry Arthur Heywood|b. 19 Jun 1859\nd. 2 Jul 1943|p35597.htm#i355964|Reverend Henry Robinson Heywood|b. 18 Aug 1833\nd. 12 Mar 1895|p35597.htm#i355961|Ella Sophia Gibson|d. 15 Aug 1928|p35597.htm#i355963|Sir Benjamin Heywood, 1st Bt.|b. 12 Dec 1793\nd. 11 Aug 1865|p35593.htm#i355930|Sophia A. Robinson|d. 25 Aug 1852|p35595.htm#i355944|Reverend William Gibson||p35597.htm#i355962||||

    Last Edited=6 May 2009
    Henry Arthur Heywood was born on 19 June 1859.1 He was the son of Reverend Henry Robinson Heywood and Ella Sophia Gibson.2 He married Katharine Louisa Waller, daughter of Rev. Canon Ernest Alured Waller, on 5 January 1899.1 He died on 2 July 1943 at age 84.1
    Children of Henry Arthur Heywood and Katharine Louisa Waller
    Geoffrey Henry Heywood+2 b. 22 Aug 1903, d. 1986
    Reverend Charles Richard Heywood+2 b. 5 Jan 1908, d. 1979
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Rev. Canon Ernest Alured Waller1
    M, #355965

    Last Edited=9 May 2009
    Child of Rev. Canon Ernest Alured Waller
    Katharine Louisa Waller+2 d. 21 Jan 1937
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.

    Katharine Louisa Waller1
    F, #355966, d. 21 January 1937

    Katharine Louisa Waller|d. 21 Jan 1937|p35597.htm#i355966|Rev. Canon Ernest Alured Waller||p35597.htm#i355965||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=9 May 2009
    Katharine Louisa Waller was the daughter of Rev. Canon Ernest Alured Waller.2 She married Henry Arthur Heywood, son of Reverend Henry Robinson Heywood and Ella Sophia Gibson, on 5 January 1899.1 She died on 21 January 1937.1
    From 5 January 1899, her married name became Heywood.
    Children of Katharine Louisa Waller and Henry Arthur Heywood
    Geoffrey Henry Heywood+2 b. 22 Aug 1903, d. 1986
    Reverend Charles Richard Heywood+2 b. 5 Jan 1908, d. 1979
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Geoffrey Henry Heywood1
    M, #355967, b. 22 August 1903, d. 1986

    Geoffrey Henry Heywood|b. 22 Aug 1903\nd. 1986|p35597.htm#i355967|Henry Arthur Heywood|b. 19 Jun 1859\nd. 2 Jul 1943|p35597.htm#i355964|Katharine Louisa Waller|d. 21 Jan 1937|p35597.htm#i355966|Reverend Henry R. Heywood|b. 18 Aug 1833\nd. 12 Mar 1895|p35597.htm#i355961|Ella S. Gibson|d. 15 Aug 1928|p35597.htm#i355963|Rev. Canon Ernest A. Waller||p35597.htm#i355965||||

    Last Edited=9 May 2009
    Geoffrey Henry Heywood was born on 22 August 1903.1 He was the son of Henry Arthur Heywood and Katharine Louisa Waller.2 He married Magdeleine Jeanne Georgette Marie Herpin, daughter of Jean Herpin, on 7 July 1931.1 He died in 1986.1
    He was educated at Repton School, Repton, Derbyshire, England.1 He was invested as a Commander, Order of the British Empire (C.B.E.).1 He was invested as a Fellow, Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (F.R.I.C.S.).1
    Children of Geoffrey Henry Heywood and Magdeleine Jeanne Georgette Marie Herpin
    Claude Geoffrey Heywood+2 b. 18 Mar 1933
    Claire Margaret Heywood+2 b. 5 Aug 1938
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Jean Herpin1
    M, #355968

    Last Edited=9 May 2009
    Jean Herpin lived at Paris, France.1
    Child of Jean Herpin
    Magdeleine Jeanne Georgette Marie Herpin+2 d. 1987
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Magdeleine Jeanne Georgette Marie Herpin1
    F, #355969, d. 1987

    Magdeleine Jeanne Georgette Marie Herpin|d. 1987|p35597.htm#i355969|Jean Herpin||p35597.htm#i355968||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=9 May 2009
    Magdeleine Jeanne Georgette Marie Herpin was the daughter of Jean Herpin.2 She married Geoffrey Henry Heywood, son of Henry Arthur Heywood and Katharine Louisa Waller, on 7 July 1931.1 She died in 1987.1
    From 7 July 1931, her married name became Heywood.
    Children of Magdeleine Jeanne Georgette Marie Herpin and Geoffrey Henry Heywood
    Claude Geoffrey Heywood+2 b. 18 Mar 1933
    Claire Margaret Heywood+2 b. 5 Aug 1938
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Claude Geoffrey Heywood1
    M, #355970, b. 18 March 1933

    Claude Geoffrey Heywood|b. 18 Mar 1933|p35597.htm#i355970|Geoffrey Henry Heywood|b. 22 Aug 1903\nd. 1986|p35597.htm#i355967|Magdeleine Jeanne Georgette Marie Herpin|d. 1987|p35597.htm#i355969|Henry A. Heywood|b. 19 Jun 1859\nd. 2 Jul 1943|p35597.htm#i355964|Katharine L. Waller|d. 21 Jan 1937|p35597.htm#i355966|Jean Herpin||p35597.htm#i355968||||

    Last Edited=9 May 2009
    Claude Geoffrey Heywood was born on 18 March 1933.1 He is the son of Geoffrey Henry Heywood and Magdeleine Jeanne Georgette Marie Herpin.2 He married Anne Helen Wilding-Davies, daughter of Theron Wilding-Davies, on 10 December 1960.1
    He was educated at Repton School, Repton, Derbyshire, England.3 He graduated from Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge University, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England, with a Master of Arts (M.A.).1 He was with the Overseas Civil Service between 1957 and 1962 at Kenya.1 He was Deputy Minister of Labour, Province of British Columbia between 1989 and 1996.1 He lived in 2003 at 1626 Verling Avenue, Saanichton, British Columbia, Canada.1
    Children of Claude Geoffrey Heywood and Anne Helen Wilding-Davies
    James Claude Heywood2 b. 19 May 1962

    Reverend Geoffrey George Temple Heywood1
    M, #356067, b. 3 November 1869, d. 3 June 1902

    Reverend Geoffrey George Temple Heywood|b. 3 Nov 1869\nd. 3 Jun 1902|p35607.htm#i356067|Reverend Henry Robinson Heywood|b. 18 Aug 1833\nd. 12 Mar 1895|p35597.htm#i355961|Ella Sophia Gibson|d. 15 Aug 1928|p35597.htm#i355963|Sir Benjamin Heywood, 1st Bt.|b. 12 Dec 1793\nd. 11 Aug 1865|p35593.htm#i355930|Sophia A. Robinson|d. 25 Aug 1852|p35595.htm#i355944|Reverend William Gibson||p35597.htm#i355962||||

    Last Edited=9 May 2009
    Reverend Geoffrey George Temple Heywood was born on 3 November 1869.1 He was the son of Reverend Henry Robinson Heywood and Ella Sophia Gibson.2 He died on 3 June 1902 at age 32, unmarried.1
    He graduated from Cambridge University, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England, with a Master of Arts (M.A.).1
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1903. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Rt. Rev. Bernard Oliver Francis Heywood1
    M, #356068, b. 1 March 1871, d. 13 March 1960

    Rt. Rev. Bernard Oliver Francis Heywood|b. 1 Mar 1871\nd. 13 Mar 1960|p35607.htm#i356068|Reverend Henry Robinson Heywood|b. 18 Aug 1833\nd. 12 Mar 1895|p35597.htm#i355961|Ella Sophia Gibson|d. 15 Aug 1928|p35597.htm#i355963|Sir Benjamin Heywood, 1st Bt.|b. 12 Dec 1793\nd. 11 Aug 1865|p35593.htm#i355930|Sophia A. Robinson|d. 25 Aug 1852|p35595.htm#i355944|Reverend William Gibson||p35597.htm#i355962||||

    Last Edited=9 May 2009
    Rt. Rev. Bernard Oliver Francis Heywood was born on 1 March 1871.1 He was the son of Reverend Henry Robinson Heywood and Ella Sophia Gibson.2 He married Marion Maude Lemprière, daughter of Captain Percy Reid Lemprière, on 17 October 1895.1 He died on 13 March 1960 at age 89.1
    He was educated at Harrow School, Harrow on the Hill, London, England.1 He graduated from Trinity College, Cambridge University, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England, with a Master of Arts (M.A.)).1 He graduated from Trinity College, Cambridge University, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England, with a Doctor of Divinity (D.D.).1 He held the office of Canon of St. Albans.1 He held the office of Bishop of Southwell between 1926 and 1928.1 He held the office of Bishop of Hull between 1930 and 1934.1 He held the office of Bishop of Ely between 1934 and 1940.1 He was Assistant Bishop to the Bishop of St. Albans between 1942 and 1951.1
    Children of Rt. Rev. Bernard Oliver Francis Heywood and Marion Maude Lemprière
    Maude Lemprière Heywood+2 b. 27 Jan 1897
    Ella Marion Heywood+2 b. 25 Oct 1898, d. 1993
    Michael Henry Lemprière Heywood+2 b. 3 Aug 1900, d. 1990
    Oliver Martin Heywood+2 b. 14 Jun 1904, d. 1982
    Charles Bernard Mark Heywood+2 b. 17 Feb 1906
    Francis Melville Heywood+2 b. 1 Oct 1908, d. 2 Nov 1995
    Percival Meredith Heywood2 b. 26 Mar 1912, d. 8 Jan 1975
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1903. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Angus Douglas Stewart Rose1
    M, #356069

    Last Edited=9 May 2009
    Angus Douglas Stewart Rose married Myra Anne Heywood, daughter of Charles Bernard Mark Heywood and Julia Veronica Cronin, on 19 June 1964.1
    He graduated with a Master of Arts (M.A.).1
    Citations
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1903. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Marion Maude Lemprière1
    F, #356070, d. 23 October 1957

    Marion Maude Lemprière|d. 23 Oct 1957|p35607.htm#i356070|Captain Percy Reid Lemprière||p35601.htm#i356007||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=9 May 2009
    Marion Maude Lemprière was the daughter of Captain Percy Reid Lemprière.2 She married Rt. Rev. Bernard Oliver Francis Heywood, son of Reverend Henry Robinson Heywood and Ella Sophia Gibson, on 17 October 1895.1 She died on 23 October 1957.1
    From 17 October 1895, her married name became Heywood.
    Children of Marion Maude Lemprière and Rt. Rev. Bernard Oliver Francis Heywood
    Maude Lemprière Heywood+2 b. 27 Jan 1897
    Ella Marion Heywood+2 b. 25 Oct 1898, d. 1993
    Michael Henry Lemprière Heywood+2 b. 3 Aug 1900, d. 1990
    Oliver Martin Heywood+2 b. 14 Jun 1904, d. 1982
    Charles Bernard Mark Heywood+2 b. 17 Feb 1906
    Francis Melville Heywood+2 b. 1 Oct 1908, d. 2 Nov 1995
    Percival Meredith Heywood2 b. 26 Mar 1912, d. 8 Jan 1975
    Sarah Anne Heywood+2 b. 20 Sep 1963
    Peter Geoffrey Heywood+2 b. 15 Jan 1965

    • Renee says:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lily_Safra
      Safra was born Lily Watkins [2] on December 30, 1934 in Porto Alegre, Brazil daughter of Wolf White Watkins, a British railway engineer who moved to South America and Annita Noudelman de Castro, a Uruguayan of Russian-Jewish ancestry.[3]:17f She grew up in Rio de Janeiro. At the age of 17, she married Mario Cohen, an Argentine hosiery magnate. They had three children: Claudio (died in a car crash in Brazil ca. 1989.[4]), Eduardo, and Adriana.

      Lily and Cohen divorced in the early 1960s. In 1965, she married Romanian immigrant Alfredo “Freddy” Monteverde[5] (formerly Greenberg[6]), a leader in the Brazilian household appliance distribution business after establishing the Ponto Frio brand. He and Lily had one child, named Carlos. In 1969, Monteverde died by suicide.[7] According to biographer Isabel Vincent, Monteverde’s will left all his assets to her and, in concert with Monteverde’s former banker, Edmond Safra, she took swift action to cut off the rest of his family.[3][page needed]

      Lily and Edmond Safra dated for some time, but she married a businessman named Samuel Bendahan in 1972, then divorced him after about a year of marriage.[8]

      In 1976, she married Safra, a prominent Brazilian-naturalized Jewish Lebanese banker, and the founder, among other achievements, of Republic National Bank of New York. The couple divided their time between homes in Monaco, Geneva, New York and Villa Leopolda on the French Riviera. In a crime that attracted extensive media interest, Safra was killed in a fire that was determined to be arson.[9] Edmond Safra “apparently felt so safe here that he did not have his bodyguards stay the night when he slept in Monaco”.[10] Ted Maher, a former Green Beret, who was Safra’s bodyguard and nurse, was accused of starting the fire.
      NOTE***

      She grew up in Rio de Janeiro. At the age of 17, she married Mario Cohen, an Argentine hosiery magnate. They had three children: Claudio (died in a car crash in Brazil ca. 1989.[4]), Eduardo, and Adriana.

      Lily and Cohen divorced in the early 1960s. In 1965, she married Romanian immigrant Alfredo “Freddy” Monteverde[5] (formerly Greenberg[6]), a leader in the Brazilian household appliance distribution business after establishing the Ponto Frio brand. He and Lily had one child, named Carlos. In 1969, Monteverde died by suicide.

      Alfredo “Freddy” Monteverde[5] (formerly Greenberg **

    • Renee says:

      http://www.eichlernetwork.com/article/eichler-architect-bob-anshen-self-made-man?page=0,1
      He would kiss your hand and it wasn’t an affectation,” says Helen Olsen, a designer and Donald’s wife. “It was natural for Bob to do this. I enjoyed him. He was completely different from anyone else I’ve ever run into, really. I could see why he would get clients, because he would sit and listen and even seem interested in what you had to say.”

      “If Anshen and Allen is bread,” Olsen says, “Steve Allen is the dough, and Anshen is the yeast—the perfect combination.”

      “The relationship between those two was extraordinary,” Parker says, “and because of their differences, and the way they were able to resolve their differences, they made each other better.”

      Anshen and Allen—whose relationship became one of the profession’s great friendships—were known for welcoming young architects to the area, often hiring them on the spot.

      When architects Warren Callister and Jack Hillmer arrived in San Francisco right after the war, they scoped out the scene by visiting all the modern architects. “Most of them said maybe you’d like to go to Seattle or Portland, go somewhere else,” Hillmer remembered. “I’ve always loved Bob Anshen, because his reaction was just the reverse. He said, ‘I hope you’ll stay here, because we need all the good architects we can get.'”

      The story told most often about Anshen and Allen, though somewhat differently each time, concerns how they secured their first job.

      The young architects, having gone through the staid school of architecture at the University of Pennsylvania, were working for separate small San Francisco firms in the late 1930s when word got out that Ralph K. Davies, vice president and marketing genius for Standard Oil of California (he devised its Chevron logo) wanted a house. A Tudor house.

      But why would Davies talk to two unknowns? Anshen recalled a scene from a Horatio Alger book he’d read at age seven. He and Allen composed a letter to Davies saying they knew his time was worth money, so they would pay him $100 for a half hour of it to make their presentation. Each borrowed $50 from their bosses.

      “We recommended a house that would have all of the qualities, the warmth, the charm and spirit of a Tudor house, with the amenities, the forms, and techniques of the present day,” Allen wrote in a tribute to Davies, years later. The house in Woodside was completed a few days before the attack on Pearl Harbor.

      The 6,000-square-foot Davies house won both press attention and the firm its staunchest patron. Designing Standard Oil stations became a mainstay for the partners after the war; they designed an office tower, the International Building, in 1957 for American President Lines—which Davies took over in the 1950s; they also designed APL staterooms; another house for Davies; and found much work, through friends and associates of Davies, including buildings for the University of California.

      Both the Sonya Silverstone house in Taxco, Mexico, from 1949, and the Chapel of the Holy Cross in Sedona, Arizona, among Anshen and Allen’s most praised works, came to them from friends of Davies.

      Pearl Harbor sent Davies to Washington, where he supervised the American petroleum industry for the government. It sent Allen into the Navy.

      Anshen snagged a job overseeing war housing for the Vallejo Housing Authority. Anshen and his wife Eleanor also wrote for progressive architectural magazines and Anshen lectured about America’s need for rational, national, and regional planning. Like his colleagues in the progressive planning association Telesis, he wanted to see Bay Area cities and special districts consolidate into one regional government.

      The Anshens called for the massive, postwar production of public housing, along with privately built housing, and expected much of it to be prefabricated in the factory.

      http://www.thepeerage.com/p35598.htm
      Theron Wilding-Davies1
      M, #355971

      Last Edited=9 May 2009
      Theron Wilding-Davies lived at Fayre Ways Stud Farm, Dorstone, Herefordshire, England.1
      Child of Theron Wilding-Davies
      Anne Helen Wilding-Davies+2
      Citations
      [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
      [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
      Anne Helen Wilding-Davies1
      F, #355972

      Anne Helen Wilding-Davies||p35598.htm#i355972|Theron Wilding-Davies||p35598.htm#i355971||||||||||||||||

      Last Edited=9 May 2009
      Anne Helen Wilding-Davies is the daughter of Theron Wilding-Davies.2 She married Claude Geoffrey Heywood, son of Geoffrey Henry Heywood and Magdeleine Jeanne Georgette Marie Herpin, on 10 December 1960.1
      From 10 December 1960, her married name became Heywood.
      Children of Anne Helen Wilding-Davies and Claude Geoffrey Heywood
      James Claude Heywood2 b. 19 May 1962
      Sarah Anne Heywood+2 b. 20 Sep 1963
      Peter Geoffrey Heywood+2 b. 15 Jan 1965
      Citations
      [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
      [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
      James Claude Heywood1
      M, #355973, b. 19 May 1962

      James Claude Heywood|b. 19 May 1962|p35598.htm#i355973|Claude Geoffrey Heywood|b. 18 Mar 1933|p35597.htm#i355970|Anne Helen Wilding-Davies||p35598.htm#i355972|Geoffrey H. Heywood|b. 22 Aug 1903\nd. 1986|p35597.htm#i355967|Magdeleine J. G. M. Herpin|d. 1987|p35597.htm#i355969|Theron Wilding-Davies||p35598.htm#i355971||||

      Last Edited=6 May 2009
      James Claude Heywood was born on 19 May 1962.1 He is the son of Claude Geoffrey Heywood and Anne Helen Wilding-Davies.2 He married Susan Anne Amesbury in 1995.1
      Citations
      [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
      [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
      Susan Anne Amesbury1
      F, #355974

      Last Edited=9 May 2009
      Susan Anne Amesbury married James Claude Heywood, son of Claude Geoffrey Heywood and Anne Helen Wilding-Davies, in 1995.1
      She lived at Manchester, Lancashire, England.1 From 1995, her married name became Heywood.
      Citations
      [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
      Peter Geoffrey Heywood1
      M, #355975, b. 15 January 1965

      Peter Geoffrey Heywood|b. 15 Jan 1965|p35598.htm#i355975|Claude Geoffrey Heywood|b. 18 Mar 1933|p35597.htm#i355970|Anne Helen Wilding-Davies||p35598.htm#i355972|Geoffrey H. Heywood|b. 22 Aug 1903\nd. 1986|p35597.htm#i355967|Magdeleine J. G. M. Herpin|d. 1987|p35597.htm#i355969|Theron Wilding-Davies||p35598.htm#i355971||||

      Last Edited=6 May 2009
      Peter Geoffrey Heywood was born on 15 January 1965.1 He is the son of Claude Geoffrey Heywood and Anne Helen Wilding-Davies.2 He married Heather Joan Gill, daughter of Barry Gill, in 1989.1
      Children of Peter Geoffrey Heywood and Heather Joan Gill
      Erin Heather Heywood2 b. 23 May 1994
      David Geoffrey Heywood2 b. 21 Feb 1996
      Citations
      [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
      [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.

      Barry Gill1
      M, #355976

      Last Edited=9 May 2009
      Barry Gill lived at Brentwood Bay, British Columbia, Canada.1
      Child of Barry Gill
      Heather Joan Gill+2
      Citations
      [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
      [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
      Heather Joan Gill1
      F, #355977

      Heather Joan Gill||p35598.htm#i355977|Barry Gill||p35598.htm#i355976||||||||||||||||

      Last Edited=9 May 2009
      Heather Joan Gill is the daughter of Barry Gill.2 She married Peter Geoffrey Heywood, son of Claude Geoffrey Heywood and Anne Helen Wilding-Davies, in 1989.1
      From 1989, her married name became Heywood.
      Children of Heather Joan Gill and Peter Geoffrey Heywood
      Erin Heather Heywood2 b. 23 May 1994
      David Geoffrey Heywood2 b. 21 Feb 1996
      Citations
      [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
      [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
      David Geoffrey Heywood1
      M, #355978, b. 21 February 1996

      David Geoffrey Heywood|b. 21 Feb 1996|p35598.htm#i355978|Peter Geoffrey Heywood|b. 15 Jan 1965|p35598.htm#i355975|Heather Joan Gill||p35598.htm#i355977|Claude G. Heywood|b. 18 Mar 1933|p35597.htm#i355970|Anne H. Wilding-Davies||p35598.htm#i355972|Barry Gill||p35598.htm#i355976||||

      Last Edited=6 May 2009
      David Geoffrey Heywood was born on 21 February 1996.1 He is the son of Peter Geoffrey Heywood and Heather Joan Gill.2
      Citations
      [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
      [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
      Erin Heather Heywood1
      F, #355979, b. 23 May 1994

      Erin Heather Heywood|b. 23 May 1994|p35598.htm#i355979|Peter Geoffrey Heywood|b. 15 Jan 1965|p35598.htm#i355975|Heather Joan Gill||p35598.htm#i355977|Claude G. Heywood|b. 18 Mar 1933|p35597.htm#i355970|Anne H. Wilding-Davies||p35598.htm#i355972|Barry Gill||p35598.htm#i355976||||

      Last Edited=6 May 2009
      Erin Heather Heywood was born on 23 May 1994.1 She is the daughter of Peter Geoffrey Heywood and Heather Joan Gill.2
      Citations
      [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1902. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
      [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
      Sarah Anne Heywood1
      F, #355980, b. 20 September 1963

      Sarah Anne Heywood|b. 20 Sep 1963|p35598.htm#i355980|Claude Geoffrey Heywood|b. 18 Mar 1933|p35597.htm#i355970|Anne Helen Wilding-Davies||p35598.htm#i355972|Geoffrey H. Heywood|b. 22 Aug 1903\nd. 1986|p35597.htm#i355967|Magdeleine J. G. M. Herpin|d. 1987|p35597.htm#i355969|Theron Wilding-Davies||p35598.htm#i355971||||

      Last Edited=9 May 2009
      Sarah Anne Heywood was born on 20 September 1963.1 She is the daughter of Claude Geoffrey Heywood and Anne Helen Wilding-Davies.2 She married Colin Derek Ewart in 1991.1
      From 1991, her married name became Ewart.
      Children of Sarah Anne Heywood and Colin Derek Ewart
      Annie Magdeleine Ewart2 b. 29 Sep 1993
      Lucy Rose Ewart2 b. 6 Jul 1996

      • Renee says:

        http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8684015-the-temptress

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_de_Janz%C3%A9

        Alice de Janzé, née Silverthorne (28 September 1899 – 30 September 1941),[1] also known as Alice de Trafford and holder of the noble title Comtesse (Countess) de Janzé for a few years, was an American heiress who spent years in Kenya, as a member of the Happy Valley set of colonials. She was connected with numerous scandals, including the attempted murder of her lover in 1927, as well as the 1941 murder of The 22nd Earl of Erroll in Kenya. Her tempestuous life was marked by promiscuity, drug abuse and several suicide attempts.

        Growing up in Chicago and New York, Silverthorne was a multi-millionaire heiress, relative of the powerful Armour family and one of the most prominent American socialites of her time. She entered French aristocracy in the early 1920s, when she married Count de Janzé. In the mid-1920s, she was introduced to the infamous Happy Valley set, a community of white expatriates in East Africa, notorious for their hedonistic lifestyle. In 1927, she made international news when she shot her lover in a Paris railway station and then shot herself. They both survived. She stood trial but was only fined with a small amount of money and later pardoned by the French state. She further scandalized the public by marrying and later divorcing the man she shot.

        In 1941, her name was brought up as one of the major suspects in the well-publicized murder of Lord Erroll in Kenya, a former lover and friend of hers. After numerous failed suicide attempts throughout her life, she died of a self-inflicted gunshot in September 1941. Her personality has been referenced both in fiction and non-fiction, most notably in the book White Mischief and its film adaptation, where she was portrayed by Sarah Miles.

        http://thepeerage.com/p7729.htm
        Eve Drummond1
        F, #77281, b. 16 January 1918

        Eve Drummond|b. 16 Jan 1918|p7729.htm#i77281|George Henry Drummond|b. 3 Mar 1883\nd. 1963|p7728.htm#i77278|Helena Kathleen Holt|d. 15 Dec 1933|p7728.htm#i77279|George J. Drummond|b. 22 Jun 1835\nd. 31 Jan 1917|p2549.htm#i25490|Elizabeth C. S. Norman|d. 4 Aug 1921|p3044.htm#i30439|T. G. Holt||p7728.htm#i77280||||

        Last Edited=20 Jun 2009
        Eve Drummond was born on 16 January 1918. She is the daughter of George Henry Drummond and Helena Kathleen Holt.1 She married Raymond Vincent de Trafford, son of Sir Humphrey Francis de Trafford, 3rd Bt. and Violet Alice Maud Franklin, on 19 May 1951.1
        Her married name became de Trafford.
        Citations
        [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1116. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
        Raymond Vincent de Trafford
        M, #77282, b. 28 January 1900, d. 14 May 1971

        Raymond Vincent de Trafford|b. 28 Jan 1900\nd. 14 May 1971|p7729.htm#i77282|Sir Humphrey Francis de Trafford, 3rd Bt.|b. 8 Jul 1862\nd. 10 Jan 1929|p1726.htm#i17251|Violet Alice Maud Franklin|d. 20 Jul 1925|p2955.htm#i29541|Sir Humphrey de Trafford, 2nd Bt.|b. 1 May 1808\nd. 4 May 1886|p1269.htm#i12682|Lady Annette M. Talbot|d. 1 Jul 1922|p1269.htm#i12681|James Franklin||p2955.htm#i29542||||

        Last Edited=6 Mar 2011
        Raymond Vincent de Trafford was born on 28 January 1900.2 He was the son of Sir Humphrey Francis de Trafford, 3rd Bt. and Violet Alice Maud Franklin.1 He married, firstly, Alice Silverthorne, daughter of William Edward Silverthorne, on 22 February 1932.2 He and Alice Silverthorne were divorced in 1938.2 He married, secondly, Eve Drummond, daughter of George Henry Drummond and Helena Kathleen Holt, on 19 May 1951.2 He died on 14 May 1971 at age 71, without issue.2
        He gained the rank of Lieutenant in the service of the Coldstream Guards.2
        Citations
        [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003). Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
        [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition, volume 1, page 1116.
        Alice Silverthorne1
        F, #77283, d. 19 March 1943

        Alice Silverthorne|d. 19 Mar 1943|p7729.htm#i77283|William Edward Silverthorne||p7729.htm#i77284||||||||||||||||

        Last Edited=20 Jun 2009
        Alice Silverthorne was the daughter of William Edward Silverthorne.1 She married, firstly, Count Frederick de Janzé before 1932.1 She married, secondly, Raymond Vincent de Trafford, son of Sir Humphrey Francis de Trafford, 3rd Bt. and Violet Alice Maud Franklin, on 22 February 1932.1 She and Raymond Vincent de Trafford were divorced in 1938.1 She died on 19 March 1943.1
        From before 1932, her married name became de Janzé.1 Her married name became de Trafford.
        Citations
        [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1116. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
        William Edward Silverthorne1
        M, #77284

        Last Edited=20 Jun 2009
        William Edward Silverthorne lived at Riverside, Illinois, U.S.A..1
        Child of William Edward Silverthorne
        Alice Silverthorne1 d. 19 Mar 1943
        Citations
        [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1116. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
        Lady Theodosia Bligh1
        F, #77285, d. 20 May 1777

        Lady Theodosia Bligh|d. 20 May 1777|p7729.htm#i77285|John Bligh, 1st Earl of Darnley|b. 28 Dec 1687\nd. 12 Sep 1728|p7598.htm#i75980|Theodosia Hyde, Baroness Clifton (of Leighton Bromswold)|b. 9 Nov 1695\nd. 30 Jul 1722|p2930.htm#i29300|Rt. Hon. Thomas Bligh|b. c 1654\nd. 28 Aug 1710|p11709.htm#i117088|Elizabeth Naper|d. 21 Mar 1736/37|p20309.htm#i203086|Edward Hyde, 3rd Earl of Clarendon|b. 28 Nov 1661\nd. 31 Mar 1723|p2930.htm#i29298|Katherine O’Brien, Baroness Clifton (of Leighton Bromswold)|b. 29 Jan 1673\nd. 11 Aug 1706|p2930.htm#i29297|

        Last Edited=22 Feb 2011
        Lady Theodosia Bligh was the daughter of John Bligh, 1st Earl of Darnley and Theodosia Hyde, Baroness Clifton (of Leighton Bromswold).2 She married William Crosbie, 1st Earl of Glandore, son of Maurice Crosbie, 1st Baron Branden and Lady Elizabeth Anne FitzMaurice, in November 1745.1 She died on 20 May 1777.1
        From November 1745, her married name became Crosbie.
        Children of Lady Theodosia Bligh and William Crosbie, 1st Earl of Glandore
        Maurice Crosbie3 b. 17 Feb 1749, d. 10 Nov 1749
        John Crosbie, 2nd Earl of Glandore4 b. 25 May 1753, d. 23 Oct 1815
        Lady Anne Crosbie+3 b. 1 Dec 1754
        Lady Theodosia Crosbie3 b. 12 Mar 1756, d. 3 Jun 1782
        Lady Arabella Crosbie+2 b. 21 Oct 1757, d. 10 Nov 1813
        Citations
        [S47] Hugh Montgomery-Massingberd, editor, Burke’s Irish Family Records (London, U.K.: Burkes Peerage Ltd, 1976), page 299. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Irish Family Records.
        [S8] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volume 1, page 179. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition.
        [S47] Hugh Montgomery-Massingberd, Burke’s Irish Family Records.
        [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume II, page 280. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

        Honora Myrtle Gladys Spiller
        F, #77286

        Honora Myrtle Gladys Spiller||p7729.htm#i77286|Lt.-Col. Duncan W. L. Spiller||p7729.htm#i77287||||||||||||||||

        Last Edited=10 May 2003
        Honora Myrtle Gladys Spiller is the daughter of Lt.-Col. Duncan W. L. Spiller. She married George Henry Drummond, son of George James Drummond and Elizabeth Cecile Sophia Norman, on 30 October 1940.
        Her married name became Drummond.
        Children of Honora Myrtle Gladys Spiller and George Henry Drummond
        Annabella Elizabeth Sarah Drummond b. 24 Aug 1941
        George Albert Harley Drummond+ b. 9 Mar 1943
        Omega Margaret Drummond b. 18 Mar 1944
        Isobel Camilla Drummond b. 4 Jan 1946
        Lt.-Col. Duncan W. L. Spiller
        M, #77287

        Last Edited=27 Dec 2003
        Lt.-Col. Duncan W. L. Spiller lived at St. Donaghs, Portmarnock, County Dublin, Ireland.
        Child of Lt.-Col. Duncan W. L. Spiller
        Honora Myrtle Gladys Spiller+
        George Albert Harley Drummond
        M, #77288, b. 9 March 1943

        George Albert Harley Drummond|b. 9 Mar 1943|p7729.htm#i77288|George Henry Drummond|b. 3 Mar 1883\nd. 1963|p7728.htm#i77278|Honora Myrtle Gladys Spiller||p7729.htm#i77286|George J. Drummond|b. 22 Jun 1835\nd. 31 Jan 1917|p2549.htm#i25490|Elizabeth C. S. Norman|d. 4 Aug 1921|p3044.htm#i30439|Lt.-Col. Duncan W. L. Spiller||p7729.htm#i77287||||

        Last Edited=17 Jun 2009
        George Albert Harley Drummond was born on 9 March 1943. He is the son of George Henry Drummond and Honora Myrtle Gladys Spiller.
        Child of George Albert Harley Drummond and Rachel Manley
        George Drummond b. 1971
        Child of George Albert Harley Drummond and Kathy Ceaton
        Matthew de Vere-Drummond+1 b. 7 Mar 1971
        Children of George Albert Harley Drummond and Debra Jane Hankins
        Sarah Georgina Joy de Vere-Drummond1
        Jade Alexandra de Vere-Drummond1
        Sasha Matthew Raymond de Vere-Drummond1 b. 1992
        Citations
        [S3805] Re: Drummond Family, “re: Drummond Family,” e-mail message to Sasha Drummond, 16 June 2009. Hereinafter cited as “re: Drummond Family.”
        Rachel Manley
        F, #77289

        Last Edited=10 May 2003
        Child of Rachel Manley and George Albert Harley Drummond
        George Drummond b. 1971
        George Drummond
        M, #77290, b. 1971

        George Drummond|b. 1971|p7729.htm#i77290|George Albert Harley Drummond|b. 9 Mar 1943|p7729.htm#i77288|Rachel Manley||p7729.htm#i77289|George H. Drummond|b. 3 Mar 1883\nd. 1963|p7728.htm#i77278|Honora M. G. Spiller||p7729.htm#i77286|||||||

        Last Edited=10 May 2003
        George Drummond was born in 1971. He is the son of George Albert Harley Drummond and Rachel Manley.

        • Renee says:

          Last Edited=22 Feb 2011
          Lady Theodosia Bligh was the daughter of John Bligh, 1st Earl of Darnley and Theodosia Hyde, Baroness Clifton (of Leighton Bromswold).2 She married William Crosbie, 1st Earl of Glandore, son of Maurice Crosbie, 1st Baron Branden and Lady Elizabeth Anne FitzMaurice, in November 1745.1 She died on 20 May 1777.1
          From November 1745, her married name became Crosbie.
          Children of Lady Theodosia Bligh and William Crosbie, 1st Earl of Glandore
          Maurice Crosbie3 b. 17 Feb 1749, d. 10 Nov 1749
          John Crosbie, 2nd Earl of Glandore4 b. 25 May 1753, d. 23 Oct 1815
          Lady Anne Crosbie+3 b. 1 Dec 1754
          Lady Theodosia Crosbie3 b. 12 Mar 1756, d. 3 Jun 1782
          Lady Arabella Crosbie+2 b. 21 Oct 1757, d. 10 Nov 1813

          ***NOTE***
          HYDE***

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruth_Paine

  27. Renee says:

    Waller ?
    Wright ?
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fats_Waller

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Lloyd_Wright
    On August 15, 1914, while Wright was working in Chicago, Julian Carlton, a male servant from Barbados who had been hired several months earlier, set fire to the living quarters of Taliesin and murdered seven people with an axe as the fire burned.[43] The dead included Mamah; her two children, John and Martha; a gardener; a draftsman named Emil Brodelle; a workman; and another workman’s son. Two people survived the mayhem, one of whom helped to put out the fire that almost completely consumed the residential wing of the house. Carlton swallowed muriatic acid immediately following the attack in an attempt to kill himself.[43] He was nearly lynched on the spot, but was taken to the Dodgeville jail.[43] Carlton died from starvation seven weeks after the attack, despite medical attention.[43]

    In 1922, Wright’s first wife, Kitty, granted him a divorce, and Wright was required to wait one year until he married his then-partner, Maude “Miriam” Noel. In 1923, Wright’s mother, Anna (Lloyd Jones) Wright, died. Wright wed Miriam Noel in November 1923, but her addiction to morphine led to the failure of the marriage in less than one year. In 1924, after the separation but while still married, Wright met Olga (Olgivanna) Lazovich Hinzenburg at a Petrograd Ballet performance in Chicago. They moved in together at Taliesin in 1925, and soon Olgivanna was pregnant with their daughter, Iovanna, born on December 2, 1925.

    On April 20, 1925, another fire destroyed the bungalow at Taliesin. Crossed wires from a newly installed telephone system were deemed to be responsible for the blaze, which destroyed a collection of Japanese prints that Wright declared invaluable. Wright estimated the loss at $250,000 to $500,000.[44] Wright rebuilt the living quarters again, naming the home “Taliesin III”.

    In 1926, Olga’s ex-husband, Vlademar Hinzenburg, sought custody of his daughter, Svetlana. In October 1926, Wright and Olgivanna were accused of violating the Mann Act and arrested in Minnetonka, Minnesota.[45] The charges were later dropped. During this period, Wright designed Graycliff (1926–31), the summer estate of Isabelle and Darwin D. Martin.

    Wright and Miriam Noel’s divorce was finalized in 1927, and once again, Wright was required to wait for one year until marrying again. Wright and Olgivanna married in 1928.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ann_Wright

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