Middle Town

©Renee 2012

There is a sleeping, small village called Middle Town. Like a story book picture, it holds all the Middletons close and cozy. With a lake, shops and cottages, it has it’s own style. We will pass thru it on the way to our Christmas adventure. Celebrating the birth of baby Jesus, we travel about.

Merry Christmas to all.

Let us start with Lady Diana Spencer’s family and go on from there.

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50 Responses to Middle Town

  1. Renee says:

    http://www.thepeerage.com/p10145.htm

    Helen Bean
    F, #101441, d. 1852

    Last Edited=19 Apr 2001
    Helen Bean died in 1852.
    Child of Helen Bean and William Smith Marr
    Barbara Smith Marr+ b. 1843
    William Littlejohn
    M, #101442, d. 1888

    Last Edited=1 Jul 2010
    William Littlejohn married Janet Bentley.1 He died in 1888.
    Children of William Littlejohn and Janet Bentley
    William Littlejohn1 b. 1839, d. 29 Sep 1898
    David Littlejohn+ b. 3 Apr 1841, d. 1924
    Citations
    [S3508] S. Thomson, “email: Kirwan Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 16 January 2009 – 12 February 2010. Hereinafter cited as “email: Kirwan Family.”
    Janet Bentley
    F, #101443, d. 1848

    Last Edited=1 Jul 2010
    Janet Bentley married William Littlejohn.1 She died in 1848.
    Her married name became Littlejohn.1
    Children of Janet Bentley and William Littlejohn
    William Littlejohn1 b. 1839, d. 29 Sep 1898
    David Littlejohn+ b. 3 Apr 1841, d. 1924
    Citations
    [S3508] S. Thomson, “email: Kirwan Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 16 January 2009 – 12 February 2010. Hereinafter cited as “email: Kirwan Family.”
    James Crombie
    M, #101444, b. 13 January 1810, d. 31 January 1878

    James Crombie|b. 13 Jan 1810\nd. 31 Jan 1878|p10145.htm#i101444|John Crombie||p32988.htm#i329876|Catherine Harvey||p32988.htm#i329877|||||||||||||

    Last Edited=1 Jul 2010
    James Crombie was born on 13 January 1810.2 He was the son of John Crombie and Catherine Harvey.1 He was baptised on 26 January 1810 at Fintray, Aberdeenshire, Scotland.2 He married Katherine Scott Forbes, daughter of Theodore Forbes and Eliza Kewark, on 30 March 1837 at St. Nicholas, Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland.2 He died on 31 January 1878 at age 68.2
    Children of James Crombie and Katherine Scott Forbes
    Helen Forbes Crombie2 b. 22 Jan 1838
    John Crombie+2 b. 3 Mar 1839, d. 2 Nov 1898
    Catherine Harvey Crombie2 b. 27 May 1840
    Annabella Forbes Crombie2 b. 4 Mar 1842
    Jane Crombie+ b. 8 Nov 1843, d. 1917
    Theodore Crombie2 b. 23 Aug 1845
    Johan Crombie2 b. 12 Dec 1847
    Margaret Isabella Crombie2 b. 26 Jan 1849
    Citations
    [S2061] Will Smith, “re: Beresford Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 10 January 2007 and 6 January 2008. Hereinafter cited as “re: Beresford Family.”
    [S3508] S. Thomson, “email: Kirwan Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 16 January 2009 – 12 February 2010. Hereinafter cited as “email: Kirwan Family.”
    Katherine Scott Forbes
    F, #101445, b. 1 December 1812, d. 10 April 1893

    Katherine Scott Forbes|b. 1 Dec 1812\nd. 10 Apr 1893|p10145.htm#i101445|Theodore Forbes|b. 3 Aug 1788\nd. 24 Sep 1820|p41284.htm#i412831|Eliza Kewark||p41284.htm#i412832|John Forbes, 5th of Boyndlie|b. 27 Jun 1758\nd. 6 Dec 1824|p41283.htm#i412830|Katherine Morison|b. 1757\nd. 5 Jan 1832|p41283.htm#i412829|||||||

    Last Edited=1 Jul 2010
    Katherine Scott Forbes was born on 1 December 1812.2 She was the daughter of Theodore Forbes and Eliza Kewark.1 She was baptised on 9 July 1818 at Surat, Maharashtra, India.2 She married James Crombie, son of John Crombie and Catherine Harvey, on 30 March 1837 at St. Nicholas, Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland.2 She died on 10 April 1893 at age 80.2
    From 30 March 1837, her married name became Crombie.
    Children of Katherine Scott Forbes and James Crombie
    Helen Forbes Crombie2 b. 22 Jan 1838
    John Crombie+2 b. 3 Mar 1839, d. 2 Nov 1898
    Catherine Harvey Crombie2 b. 27 May 1840
    Annabella Forbes Crombie2 b. 4 Mar 1842
    Jane Crombie+ b. 8 Nov 1843, d. 1917
    Theodore Crombie2 b. 23 Aug 1845
    Johan Crombie2 b. 12 Dec 1847
    Margaret Isabella Crombie2 b. 26 Jan 1849
    Citations
    [S4053] Christopher Davis, “re: Barton Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger LUNDY (101053), 30 October 2009. Hereinafter cited as “re: Barton Family.”
    [S3508] S. Thomson, “email: Kirwan Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 16 January 2009 – 12 February 2010. Hereinafter cited as “email: Kirwan Family.”

    Lady Gabriella Marina Alexandra Ophelia Windsor1
    F, #101446, b. 23 April 1981

    Lady Gabriella Marina Alexandra Ophelia Windsor|b. 23 Apr 1981|p10145.htm#i101446|Michael George Charles Franklin Windsor, Prince of Kent|b. 4 Jul 1942|p10076.htm#i100754|Marie-Christine Agnes Hedwig Ida Baronin von Reibnitz|b. 15 Jan 1945|p10097.htm#i100966|George E. A. E. Windsor, 1st Duke of Kent|b. 20 Dec 1902\nd. 25 Aug 1942|p10069.htm#i100682|Marina zu Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, Princess of Greece and Denmark|b. 30 Nov 1906\nd. 27 Aug 1968|p10072.htm#i100713|Günther H. Baron von Reibnitz||p10417.htm#i104170|Maria A. C. F. W. B. S. von Muraszombath, Széchysziget und Szapár, Countess Szapár||p10418.htm#i104171|

    Last Edited=28 May 2004
    Lady Gabriella Marina Alexandra Ophelia Windsor was born on 23 April 1981 at St. Mary’s Hospital, Praed Street, Paddington, London, England.1 She is the daughter of Michael George Charles Franklin Windsor, Prince of Kent and Marie-Christine Agnes Hedwig Ida Baronin von Reibnitz.2 She was baptised on 8 June 1981 at St. James’s Palace, Chapel Royal, St. James’s, London, England.
    Lady Gabriella Marina Alexandra Ophelia Windsor also went by the nick-name of Ella.2 She was educated at Downe House School, Cold Ash, Thatcham, Berkshire, England.2 She was educated at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A..2
    Citations
    [S3] Marlene A. Eilers, Queen Victoria’s Descendants (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1987), page 175. Hereinafter cited as Queen Victoria’s Descendants.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page cxli. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Thomas Troubridge1
    M, #101447, b. 26 December 1939

    Thomas Troubridge|b. 26 Dec 1939|p10145.htm#i101447|Vice-Admiral Sir Thomas Hope Troubridge|b. 1 Feb 1895\nd. 29 Sep 1949|p39243.htm#i392424|Lily Emily Kleinwort|d. 17 Apr 1983|p39248.htm#i392480|Admiral Sir Ernest C. T. Troubridge|b. 15 Jul 1862\nd. 28 Jan 1926|p7340.htm#i73395|Edith M. Duffus|d. 10 Jan 1900|p7340.htm#i73396|Herman G. Kleinwort|b. 3 Jul 1856\nd. 18 Jun 1942|p13954.htm#i139539|Marguerite M. J. Gunther|d. 31 Jul 1935|p49259.htm#i492581|

    Last Edited=22 Aug 2009
    Thomas Troubridge was born on 26 December 1939 at London, England.1 He is the son of Vice-Admiral Sir Thomas Hope Troubridge and Lily Emily Kleinwort.2 He married Marie-Christine Agnes Hedwig Ida Baronin von Reibnitz, daughter of Günther Hubertus Baron von Reibnitz and Maria Anna Carolina Franziska Walpurga Bernadette Szapáry von Muraszombath, Széchysziget und Szapár, Countess Szapár, on 15 September 1971 at London, England.1
    His marriage to Marie-Christine Agnes Hedwig Ida Baronin von Reibnitz was annulled in May 1978 by the Roman Catholic Church on disclosed grounds.3
    Citations
    [S3] Marlene A. Eilers, Queen Victoria’s Descendants (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1987), page 179. Hereinafter cited as Queen Victoria’s Descendants.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 3, page 3948. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S11] Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 326. Hereinafter cited as Britain’s Royal Family.
    John Charles Montagu Douglas Scott, 9th Duke of Queensberry1
    M, #101448, b. 30 March 1864, d. 19 October 1935

    John Charles Montagu Douglas Scott, 9th Duke of Queensberry|b. 30 Mar 1864\nd. 19 Oct 1935|p10145.htm#i101448|William Henry Walter Montagu Douglas Scott, 6th Duke of Buccleuch|b. 9 Sep 1831\nd. 5 Nov 1914|p10359.htm#i103582|Lady Louisa Jane Hamilton|b. 26 Aug 1836\nd. 16 Mar 1912|p10359.htm#i103583|Walter F. Montagu Douglas Scott, 5th Duke of Buccleuch|b. 25 Nov 1806\nd. 16 Apr 1884|p10359.htm#i103581|Lady Charlotte A. Thynne|b. 10 Apr 1811\nd. 18 Mar 1895|p1075.htm#i10745|James Hamilton, 1st Duke of Abercorn|b. 21 Jan 1811\nd. 31 Oct 1885|p10144.htm#i101433|Lady Louisa J. Russell|b. 8 Jul 1812\nd. 31 Mar 1905|p10144.htm#i101432|

    Last Edited=6 Feb 2011
    Consanguinity Index=0.08%

    John Montagu Douglas Scott, 7th Duke of Buccleuch2 John Charles Montagu Douglas Scott, 9th Duke of Queensberry was born on 30 March 1864 at Hamilton Place, London, England.3 He was the son of William Henry Walter Montagu Douglas Scott, 6th Duke of Buccleuch and Lady Louisa Jane Hamilton.3 He was baptised on 21 May 1864 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, England.3 He married Lady Margaret Alice Bridgeman, daughter of George Cecil Orlando Bridgeman, 4th Earl of Bradford and Lady Ida Frances Annabella Lumley, on 30 January 1893.4 He died on 19 October 1935 at age 71 at Bowhill, Selkirkshire, Scotland.5 He was buried on 22 October 1935 at Buccleuch Memorial Chapel, St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, Dalkeith, Scotland.5
    He gained the rank of Lieutenant in the service of the Royal Navy.3 He was styled as Earl of Dalkeith between 1886 and 1914.5 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Conservative) for Roxburghshire between 1895 and 1906.3 He held the office of Justice of the Peace (J.P.) for Selkirk and Roxburghshire.6 He held the office of Deputy Lieutenant (D.L.) of Edinburgh.6 He held the office of Deputy Lieutenant (D.L.) of Selkirk and Roxburghshire.6 He succeeded to the title of 7th Earl of Dalkeith [S., 1663] on 5 November 1914.5 He succeeded to the title of 9th Duke of Queensberry on 5 November 1914.1 He succeeded to the title of 7th Duke of Buccleuch [S., 1663] on 5 November 1914.5 He succeeded to the title of 10th Earl of Buccleuch [S., 1619] on 5 November 1914.5 He succeeded to the title of 7th Baron Scott of Tindall, Northumberland [E., 1663] on 5 November 1914.5 He succeeded to the title of 7th Earl of Doncaster, co. York [E., 1663] on 5 November 1914.5 He succeeded to the title of 10th Baron Scott of Quhitchester and Eskdaill [S., 1619] on 5 November 1914.5 He succeeded to the title of 11th Lord Scott of Buccleuch [S., 1606] on 5 November 1914.5 He succeeded to the title of 7th Baron Scott of Whitchester and Eskdale [S., 1663] on 5 November 1914.5 He held the office of Captain General of the Royal Company of Archers.6 He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Thistle (K.T.).6 He was invested as a Knight Grand Cross, Royal Victorian Order (G.C.V.O.).6 He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Dumfries-shire.6 He held the office of Lord Clerk Register [Scotland] between 1926 and 1935.6 He gained the rank of Honorary Colonel in 1929 in the service of the 78th (Lowland) Field Brigade, Royal Artillery (Territorial Army).6
    Children of John Charles Montagu Douglas Scott, 9th Duke of Queensberry and Lady Margaret Alice Bridgeman
    Lady Margaret Ida Montagu Douglas Scott6 b. 13 Nov 1893, d. 17 Dec 1976
    Walter John Montagu Douglas Scott, 10th Duke of Queensberry+5 b. 30 Dec 1894, d. 4 Oct 1973
    Lt.-Col. Lord William Walter Montagu Douglas Scott+6 b. 17 Jan 1896, d. 30 Jan 1958
    Lady Sybil Anne Montagu Douglas Scott+6 b. 14 Jul 1899, d. 1990
    Lady Alice Christabel Montagu Douglas Scott+7 b. 25 Dec 1901, d. 29 Oct 2004
    Lady Mary Theresa Montagu Douglas Scott+6 b. 4 Mar 1904, d. 1984
    Lady Angela Christine Rose Montagu Douglas Scott+6 b. 26 Dec 1906, d. 28 Sep 2000
    Lord George Francis John Montagu Douglas Scott+6 b. 8 Jul 1911, d. 8 Jun 1999
    Citations
    [S3] Marlene A. Eilers, Queen Victoria’s Descendants (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1987), page 174. Hereinafter cited as Queen Victoria’s Descendants.
    [S300] Michael Rhodes, “re: Ernest Fawbert Collection,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 8 February. Hereinafter cited as “re: Ernest Fawbert Collection.”
    [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume II, page 373. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 483. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S2] Peter W. Hammond, editor, The Complete Peerage or a History of the House of Lords and All its Members From the Earliest Times, Volume XIV: Addenda & Corrigenda (Stroud, Gloucestershire, U.K.: Sutton Publishing, 1998), page 119. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage, Volume XIV.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition, volume 1, page 563.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition, volume 1, page cxl.
    Peter Shand Kydd1
    M, #101449, b. 1925, d. 23 March 2006

    Peter Shand Kydd|b. 1925\nd. 23 Mar 2006|p10145.htm#i101449|Norman Shand Kydd||p19106.htm#i191057||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=11 May 2006
    Peter Shand Kydd was born in 1925.1 He was the son of Norman Shand Kydd.2 He married, firstly, Janet Munro Kerr.2 He married, secondly, Hon. Frances Ruth Burke Roche, daughter of Edmund Maurice Burke Roche, 4th Baron Fermoy and Ruth Sylvia Gill, on 2 May 1969.3 He and Hon. Frances Ruth Burke Roche were divorced in 1990.3 He died on 23 March 2006.2
    Children of Peter Shand Kydd and Janet Munro Kerr
    John Shand Kydd4
    Angela Shand Kydd1
    Adam Shand Kydd4 b. 5 Sep 1954, d. 25 Apr 2004
    Citations
    [S1122] Peerage News, online http://peeragenews.blogspot.co.nz/. Hereinafter cited as Peerage News.
    [S466] Notices, The Daily Telegraph, London, UK, 30 March 2006. Hereinafter cited as The Daily Telegraph.
    [S8] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volume 2, page 2674. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition.
    [S466] The Daily Telegraph, 30 April 2004.
    Sir Willoughby Aston, 2nd Bt.1
    M, #101450, b. 5 July 1640, d. 14 December 1702

    Sir Willoughby Aston, 2nd Bt.|b. 5 Jul 1640\nd. 14 Dec 1702|p10145.htm#i101450|Sir Thomas Aston, 1st Bt.|b. 29 Sep 1600\nd. 24 Mar 1645/46|p2836.htm#i28356|Anne Willoughby|b. c 1614\nd. 2 Jun 1688|p12662.htm#i126619|John Aston|d. 13 May 1615|p12662.htm#i126612|Maud Needham||p12662.htm#i126613|Sir Henry Willoughby, 1st Bt.||p12663.htm#i126621|Elizabeth Knollys||p12663.htm#i126622|

    Last Edited=17 Apr 2006
    Sir Willoughby Aston, 2nd Bt. was born on 5 July 1640.1 He was the son of Sir Thomas Aston, 1st Bt. and Anne Willoughby.1 He married Mary Offley, daughter of John Offley and Mary Broughton, before 1665.1 He died on 14 December 1702 at age 62.1 He was buried at Aston, Cheshire, England.1
    He succeeded to the title of 2nd Baronet Aston, of Aston [in the parish of Runcorn], co. Chester [E., 1628] on 24 March 1645/46.1 He held the office of Sheriff of Cheshire from 1680 to 1681.1 He held the office of Sheriff of Cheshire from 1690 to 1691.1 He built a new mansion at Aston, a short distance from the old residence.1
    Children of Sir Willoughby Aston, 2nd Bt. and Mary Offley
    Richard Aston+2 d. 24 Nov 1741
    Sir Thomas Aston, 3rd Bt.+1 b. 17 Jan 1665/66, d. 16 Jan 1724/25
    Citations
    [S15] George Edward Cokayne, editor, The Complete Baronetage, 5 volumes (no date (c. 1900); reprint, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 1983), volume II, page 48. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Baronetage.
    [S15] George Edward Cokayne, The Complete Baronetage, volume II, page 49.

    • Renee says:

      Harvey:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Harvey_(entrepreneur)

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lee_Harvey_Oswald

      Also see:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Paine

      Michael R. Paine (born June 25, 1928) is a retired engineer who worked for Bell Helicopter in Fort Worth, Texas in 1963. He became notable after the assassination of John F. Kennedy because of his and his wife’s acquaintance with alleged assassin Lee Harvey Oswald.
      Paine was born in New York, New York. His father was Lyman Paine, an architect and activist. His mother was Ruth Forbes Paine Young, financial backer of International Peace Academy and daughter of Elise Cabot Forbes. He had one sibling: Cameron Paine.[1]

      Paine graduated from high school in New York in 1947. He attended Harvard University for two years and Swarthmore College for a year, but did not graduate.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyman_Paine

      LYMAN* (Wizard of Oz)

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L._Frank_Baum

      http://www.arthuryoung.com/ruth.html

      Ruth Forbes Young was born in 1903 a great granddaughter of the American transcendentalist philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson and John Murray Forbes of Boston/China tea trade fame. As a young woman she assisted her uncle Cameron Forbes, the first Govenor General of the Phillipines, host such figures as General Pershing and President Taft at her family’s Massachusettes island retreat. She studied painting at the Arts Students League, later showing her still lifes and landscapes in one-woman exhibitions in New York and Philadelphia. With her first husband, the architect George Lyman Paine Jr. she bore two sons, Michael and Cameron. Designing sets and costumes herself she produced ballets in Santa Barbara where she moved with her children after divorce. Marriage to her second husband Giles Thomas ended with his death in 1944.

      Mrs. Young’s mature contribution to international affairs was triggered by the dropping of the Atom Bomb in 1945. Believing every citizen who was able should act to help prevent further catastrophic war, she joined the World Federalists bringing such people as Clement Atlee to the table of several fundraising dinners she organized. When she realized more could be done to involve private citizens directly in the quest for peace–for the Federalists lobbied the government–she initiated the group IPAC, or the International Peace Academy Committee to study what most needed to be done. On the advice of U- Thant, she sought out Maj. General Indar Jit Rikhye who had been Dag Hammarskjold’s as well as his own military advisor; for he knew more about the subject of conflict resolution than any other professional.

      In 1970 Mrs. Young founded the International Peace Academy with General Rikhye as its president. In the following decades as part of her fundraising efforts, she wrote letters to vast numbers of individuals interested in international affairs informing them of the Academy’s unique mission and programs.

      In the late 1940′s she married her third husband, the inventor of the Bell 47 Helicopter and philosopher Arthur Middleton Young. In 1972 the couple founded the Institute for the Study of Consciousness in Berkeley, California. Since her husband’s death in 1995, Mrs. Young has primarily devoted herself to encouraging the study of Young’s metaparadigm, the Theory of Process, which resolves the conflict between the findings of science and spirituality and is increasingly applied to practical problems in the fields of education, psychology, business and international affairs.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paine_Webber

      Paine Webber and Company was an American stock brokerage and asset management firm that was acquired by the Swiss bank UBS AG in 2000. The company was founded in 1880 in Boston, Massachusetts, by William Alfred Paine and Wallace G. Webber. Operating with two employees, they leased premises at 48 Congress Street in May 1881. The company was renamed Paine, Webber & Co. when Charles Hamilton Paine became a partner. Members of the Boston Stock Exchange, in 1890 the company acquired a seat on the New York Stock Exchange. Wallace G. Webber retired after the business weathered a major financial crisis that hit the market in 1893.

      Also see:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bell_Helicopter

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Textron

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Little

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little,_Brown_and_Company

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guy_Harvey

      (Also see: golf, batwing/batman story ) here:

      http://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2012/12/16/mind-games-and-staged-terror-to-disarm-with-smiles/

      And:

      http://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2012/12/26/spinning-the-names-part-3/

      And note as well:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Payne_Stewart

      Guy (also see the Cambridge 5 spy ring)

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guy_Burgess

      Forbes*

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christine_Lagarde

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Kerry

      Also see:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiorello_La_Guardia

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Notre-Dame_de_la_Garde

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thompson-LaGarde_Tests

      Smith:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C._R._Smith

      (See also American Airlines)

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Smith

      In office
      January 1, 1923 – December 31, 1928
      Lieutenant George R. Lunn (1923–1924)
      Seymour Lowman (1925–1926)
      Edwin Corning (1926–1928)
      Preceded by Nathan L. Miller
      Succeeded by Franklin D. Roosevelt
      In office
      January 1, 1919 – December 31, 1920
      Lieutenant Harry C. Walker
      Preceded by Charles S. Whitman
      Succeeded by Nathan L. Miller
      8th President of the New York City Board of Aldermen
      In office
      January 1, 1917 – December 31, 1918
      Preceded by Frank L. Dowling
      Succeeded by Robert L. Moran
      Personal details
      Born Alfred Emanuel Smith.
      (1873-12-30)December 30, 1873
      Manhattan, New York City
      Died October 4, 1944(1944-10-04) (aged 70)
      New York City
      Political party Democratic
      Spouse(s) Catherine Ann Dunn
      Children 5
      Residence Manhattan, New York

    • Renee says:

      QL, For you:
      Custom Bentley front clip with hood storage, rear body with sweater storage and golf club compartment. This Custom unit is on a recondition Club Car golf cart …

  2. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Spencer-Churchill,_11th_Duke_of_Marlborough

    John George Vanderbilt Henry Spencer-Churchill, 11th Duke of Marlborough, DL, JP (born 13 April 1926), is the son of Lt.-Col. John Spencer-Churchill, 10th Duke of Marlborough and his wife, Hon. Alexandra Mary Hilda Cadogan. His principal seat is Blenheim Palace, in Woodstock, Oxfordshire. He is also a relation of The Duke of Devonshire and generational cousin of the war-time Conservative Prime Minister, Sir Winston Churchill. He is also a distant relative of Diana, Princess of Wales as both belong to the Spencer family; and of the Vanderbilt family through his paternal grandmother, Consuelo Vanderbilt.

    The Duke of Marlborough ranked 224th in the Sunday Times Rich List 2004, with an estimated wealth of £185m. He allowed Kenneth Branagh to film his production of Hamlet at the ducal palace of Blenheim, and appeared in a small cameo in the motion picture.

  3. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oliver_Hazard_Payne

    Oliver Hazard Payne (July 21, 1839 – June 27, 1917) was an American businessman, organizer of the American Tobacco trust, and assisted with the formation of U.S. Steel, and was affiliated with Standard Oil. He is considered one of the 100 wealthiest Americans, having left an enormous fortune.[1] His estate at Esopus, New York, known as the Col. Oliver Hazard Payne Estate, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2002 and is now the home of Marist College’s Raymond A. Rich Institute for Leadership Development.[2]

    [edit] BiographyThe son of businessman-politician Henry B. Payne and Mary Perry, he graduated from Phillips Academy Andover in 1859, then studied at Yale University. At the outbreak of the U.S. Civil War in 1861 he enlisted in the Union Army, though he could have afforded to pay someone to go in his place. In 1863, he became colonel of the 124th Ohio Infantry. He was Brevetted Brigadier General March 13, 1865. Upon the end of the war, he began his career, investing in iron and then oil refining. His oil interests were the first acquired by Standard Oil, and he became a trustee of that firm and acted as a lobbyist. He was charged with bribing members of the Ohio Legislature to attain a Senate seat for his father (before the U.S. Senate was directly elected), and with bribing the Democratic Party to name his brother-in-law United States Secretary of the Navy, though the charges were dropped.

    He was the uncle of Payne Whitney. He was also the uncle of Congresswoman Frances Payne Bolton (1885–1977). He was named for Oliver Hazard Perry, a relative of his mother.

    He is currently buried at the Lake View Cemetery, which is located in Cleveland, Ohio.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_B._Payne

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Payne_Whitney

    William Payne Whitney (March 20, 1876 – May 25, 1927) was a wealthy American businessman and member of the influential Whitney family.

    [edit] BiographyThe son of William C. Whitney and Flora Payne, and younger brother to Harry, he was known throughout his life by his middle name.

    Payne Whitney attended Groton School and then Yale University. There, he was a member of Skull and Bones,[1]:171 Delta Kappa Epsilon, and captained the Yale rowing team. In later years, he helped finance the team, including donating funds to build a dormitory for the crew. After graduating in 1898, Whitney then studied law at the Harvard Law School, receiving his Bachelor of Laws in 1901.

    In 1902, he married Helen Hay (1875–1944), the daughter of then-United States Secretary of State (and former U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom) John Hay. Their Stanford White-designed house at 972 Fifth Avenue was a wedding gift from his maternal uncle, Oliver Hazard Payne. The couple also had an estate, Greentree, in Manhasset, New York. Their son, John Hay Whitney, also served as the Ambassador to the U.K. Daughter Joan, an avid sportsperson, was the first owner of the New York Mets Major League Baseball team.

    In addition to a substantial inheritance from his father, Payne Whitney inherited $63,000,000 from his uncle, Col. Oliver Hazard Payne. Amongst his many investments, Whitney had major holdings in banking, tobacco, railroads, mining and oil. He was a member of the board of directors and/or an executive officer of several large corporations, including the City Bank New York, and the Great Northern Paper Company, and the Northern Finance Corporation.

    Throughout his life, Payne Whitney was involved in philanthropic work for a variety of causes. A trustee of the New York Public Library, in 1923 he gifted the library $12,000,000.

    A horse racing enthusiast in the tradition of his father and brother, Payne Whitney’s Greentree Stable, named for their Long Island estate, was a very significant racing and breeding operation for thoroughbred horses.

    Whitney died in 1927 at his Greentree estate. His will bequeathed more than $20 million to the New York Hospital and smaller amounts to other educational and medical institutions. His estate funds contributed to the establishment of the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic at New York-Presbyterian Hospital in 1932. Although he had contributed $1,000,000 to the Yale Endowment Fund shortly before his death, sufficient estate funds were also given to Yale to enable construction of the 9½ storey Payne Whitney Gym that too was completed in 1932. As a tribute to him, a road in Manhasset was named after him, Payne Whitney Lane.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whitney_family

  4. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helen_Hay_Whitney

    She was the daughter of Clara Louise Stone, and her husband, John Milton Hay, who served as the United States Ambassador to Great Britain and United States Secretary of State.

    Helen Hay was a poet and an author of books for children. A number of her poems were published in Harper’s Magazine. [1] A poem of hers, ‘Love of the Rose’ was used in Leon Ardin’s opera, Antony and Cleopatra (Act 2, no. 15). [2] Herbs And Apples (1910) [3] is a collection of poems that she published using what she had given for The Metropolitan Magazine, and Collier’s Weekly. “Songs and Sonnets,” “Gypsy Verses” are also some of her works produced in such a manner. Several of her works have been republished in the 21st century.

    In 1902 she married Payne Whitney with whom she had a daughter, Joan, and a son, John. The couple built a home at 972 Fifth Avenue in New York City designed by Stanford White. Helen Hay Whitney lived there until her death in 1944. The government of France acquired the property in 1952 and is part of the French Embassy in the United States. The Whitneys also owned a 438-acre (1.77 km2) estate in Manhasset, New York they called Greentree and she and her formed Greentree Stable that, under her management became a major force in Thoroughbred flat and steeplechase horse racing. [4] Her horses won the American Grand National steeplechase in 1926, 1927, 1928, and 1937. In flat racing, her horses won the Kentucky Derby and Belmont Stakes in 1931 and 1942.

    See also Alice, Armour family and the Happy Valley set.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Josslyn_Hay,_22nd_Earl_of_Erroll

    Josslyn Victor Hay, 22nd Earl of Erroll (11 May 1901, Mayfair, London – 24 January 1941, Nairobi-Ngong road, Kenya)[1] was a British peer, famed for the unsolved case surrounding his murder and the sensation it caused during wartime Britain.

    Hay was the eldest son of the diplomat Victor Hay, Lord Kilmarnock (later Earl of Erroll) and his wife Lucy, the only daughter of Sir Allan Mackenzie, 2nd Baronet. In 1911, he attended the coronation of George V and carried his grandfather’s coronet.[2] He began at Eton College in 1914 but was dismissed two years later.

    Although possessing one of Scotland’s most distinguished titles, the earls, by this time, had no wealth, and had to develop careers to earn their living. In 1920, Hay was appointed honorary attaché at Berlin under his father, who was earlier appointed chargé d’affaires there before the arrival of Edgar Vincent, 1st Viscount D’Abernon.[3] His father was soon appointed High Commissioner to the Rhineland, but Hay stayed in Berlin and served under Lord D’Abernon until 1922.

    After passing the Foreign Office examinations, Hay was expected to follow his father into diplomacy, but instead became infatuated with Lady Idina Sackville, a daughter of Gilbert Sackville, 8th Earl De La Warr, divorced wife of the politician Euan Wallace and the current wife of Charles Gordon. Lady Idina soon divorced her husband in 1923 and she and Hay were married on 22 September 1923.[1]

    [edit] KenyaAfter causing a society scandal due to their marriage – she was twice-divorced, notoriously unconventional in many ways, and eight years his senior – Hay and his wife moved to Kenya in 1924, financing the move with Idina’s money. Their home was a bungalow on the slopes of the Aberdare Range which they called Slains, after the former Hay family seat of Slains Castle which was sold by Hay’s grandfather, the 20th Earl, in 1916. The bungalow was sited alongside the high altitude farms which other white settlers were establishing at the time.

    The Happy Valley set were a group of elite, colonial expatriates who became notorious for drug use, drinking, adultery and promiscuity amongst other things. Hay soon became a part of this group and accumulated debts. After Hay had inherited his father’s titles in 1928, his wife divorced him in 1930 because he was cheating her financially and Hay married the divorced Edith Maud Ramsay-Hill on 8 February 1930. They lived in Oserian, a Moroccan-style house on the shores of Lake Naivasha and his new wife succumbed to the hedonistic lifestyle of Happy Valley.

    On a visit to England in 1934, Lord Erroll joined Oswald Mosley’s British Union of Fascists and on his return to Kenya a year later, became president of the Convention of Associations. He attended the coronation of George VI in 1936 and was elected to the legislative council as member for Kiambu in 1939.[4] On the outbreak of World War II that year, Lord Erroll became a captain in the Kenya Regiment and accepted the post of Military Secretary for East Africa in 1940.

    On 13 October 1939, Lady Erroll died. At the Muthaiga Country Club in 1940, Lord Erroll met Lady Diana Broughton, the wife of Sir Jock Delves Broughton, Bt. (and, ultimately, Baroness Delamere).[citation needed]

    [edit] MurderDelves Broughton learned of the affair and after spending a night with Lady Delves Broughton, Lord Erroll was found shot dead in his Buick at a crossroads on the Nairobi-Ngong road on 24 January 1941. Sir Jock was accused of the murder, arrested on 10 March and stood trial from 26 May. Accounting for the fact that there were no eyewitnesses, the evidence against him was weak and his hairdresser was also foreman of the jury, Sir Jock was acquitted on 1 July. He committed suicide in England a year later.

    Lord Erroll was buried in the graveyard of St Paul’s Church, Kiambu, Kenya next to his second wife. His earldom and lordship of Hay passed to his only daughter, Diana, by his first wife, whilst his barony of Kilmarnock passed to his brother, Gilbert.

    [edit] Popular cultureThe incident inspired James Fox’s 1982 investigative book White Mischief, which was in 1987 adapted into the film of the same title by Michael Radford.
    The BBC television drama The Happy Valley, first transmitted on 6 September 1987, told the story of Erroll’s murder, as seen through the eyes of 15 year-old the Hon. Juanita Carbery, daughter of Lord Carbery, to whom Broughton confessed his guilt even before he was arrested.[5]
    The incident was also adapted into an episode of the mini-series Julian Fellowes Investigates: A Most Mysterious Murder – The Case of the Earl of Erroll in 2005.
    [edit] References^ a b Cokayne et al., The Complete Peerage, volume I, p.1337
    ^ London Gazette – 26 September 1911
    ^ London Gazette – 23 January 1920
    ^ London Gazette – 10 November 1936
    ^ [1]
    [edit] SourcesDavenport-Hines, Richard – Hay, Josslyn Victor, twenty-second earl of Erroll (1901–1941), colonist in Kenya and philanderer – Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
    Genealogy website

  5. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Cartland

    Born Mary Barbara Hamilton Cartland at 31 Augustus Road, Edgbaston, Birmingham, England. She was the only daughter and eldest child of a British army officer, Major Bertram Cartland[1] (born James Bertram Falkner Cartland 1876; died 27 May 1918), and his wife, Mary Hamilton Scobell, known as “Polly” (1877–1976). Though she was born into an enviable degree of middle-class comfort, the family’s security was severely shaken after the suicide of her paternal grandfather, James Cartland, a financier, who shot himself in the wake of bankruptcy.

    This was followed soon after by her father’s death on a Flanders battlefield in World War I. However, her enterprising mother opened a London dress shop to make ends meet — “Poor I may be,” Polly Cartland once remarked, “but common I am not” — and to raise Cartland and her two brothers, Anthony and Ronald, both of whom were eventually killed in battle, one day apart, in 1940.

    After attending The Alice Ottley School, Malvern Girls’ College, and Abbey House, an educational institution in Hampshire, Cartland soon became successful as a society reporter and writer of romantic fiction. Cartland admitted she was inspired in her early work by the novels of Edwardian author Elinor Glyn, whom she idolized and eventually befriended.

    [edit] NovelsSee also Barbara Cartland bibliography
    After a year as a gossip columnist for the Daily Express, Cartland published her first novel, Jigsaw (1922), a risqué society thriller that became a bestseller. She also began writing and producing somewhat racy plays, one of which, Blood Money (1926), was banned by the Lord Chamberlain’s Office. In the 1920s and 1930s Cartland was a prominent young hostess in London society, noted for her beauty, energetic charm and daring parties. Her fashion sense also had a part and she was one of the first clients of designer Norman Hartnell, remaining a client until he died in 1979. He made her presentation and wedding dresses; the latter was made to her own design against Hartnell’s wishes and she admitted it was a failure.

    Cartland’s image as a self-appointed ‘expert’ on romance drew some ridicule in her later years, when her social views became more conservative. Indeed, although her first novels were considered sensational, Cartland’s later (and arguably most popular) titles were comparatively tame with virginal heroines and few, if any, suggestive situations. Almost all of Cartland’s later books were historical in theme, which allowed for the believability of chastity (at least, to many of her audience).

    Despite their tame story lines, Barbara Cartland’s later novels were highly successful. By 1983 she rated the longest entry in the British Who’s Who (though most of that article was a list of her books), and was named the top-selling author in the world by the Guinness Book of World Records. In the mid-1990s, by which time she had sold over a billion books, Vogue magazine called her “the true Queen of Romance”. She became a mainstay of the popular media in her trademark pink dresses and plumed hats, discoursing on matters of love, marriage, politics, religion, health, and fashion. She was publicly opposed to the removal of prayer from state schools and spoke against infidelity and divorce, although she admitted to being acquainted with both of these moral failings.

    In 1983 Cartland wrote 23 novels, and holds the Guinness World Record for the most novels written in a single year.

    [edit] MusicIn 1978 Cartland released ‘An Album Of Love Songs’ through State Records,[2] the album featured Cartland performing a series of popular standards with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, including ‘I’ll Follow My Secret Heart’ and ‘A Nightingale Sang In Berkeley Square’.[3]

    [edit] Contribution to aviationPrivately, Cartland took an interest in the early gliding movement. Although aerotowing for launching gliders first occurred in Germany, she thought of long-distance tows in 1931 and did a 200-mile (360 km) tow in a two-seater glider. The idea led to troop-carrying gliders. In 1984, she was awarded the Bishop Wright Air Industry Award for this contribution.[4]

    She regularly attended Brooklands aerodrome and motor-racing circuit during the 1920s and 1930s, and the Brooklands Museum has preserved a sitting-room from that era and named it after her.

    [edit] Marriage and relationshipsAccording to an obituary published in The Daily Telegraph on 22 May 2000, Cartland reportedly broke off her first engagement, to a Guards officer, when she learned about sexual intercourse and recoiled. This claim fits in with her image as part of a generation for whom such matters were never discussed, but sits uneasily with her having produced work controversial at the time for its sexual subject matter, as described above. She was married to Alexander George McCorquodale (died 1964), a British Army officer from Scotland, and heir to a printing fortune, from 1927 to 1932.

    Their daughter, Raine McCorquodale (born in 1929), whom Cartland later alleged was the daughter of Prince George, Duke of Kent, became “Deb of the Year” in 1947. After the McCorquodales’ 1936 divorce, which involved charges and countercharges of infidelity, Cartland married a man her husband had accused her of dallying with — his cousin Hugh McCorquodale, a former military officer. She and her second husband, who died in 1963, had two sons, Ian and Glen McCorquodale.

    Cartland maintained a long-time friendship with Lord Mountbatten of Burma, whose 1979 murder she claimed was the “greatest sadness of my life”. Mountbatten supported Cartland in her various charitable works, particularly for United World Colleges, and even helped her write her book Love at the Helm, providing background naval and historical information. The Mountbatten Memorial Trust, established by Mountbatten’s great-nephew Charles, Prince of Wales after Mountbatten was assassinated in Ireland, was the recipient of the proceeds of this book on its release in 1980.

    In 1991, aged 90, Cartland was invested by Queen Elizabeth II as a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire in honour of the author’s nearly 70 years of literary, political, and social contributions.

    Cartland did not get on with her step-granddaughter Diana, Princess of Wales, who notably did not invite Cartland to her wedding to the Prince of Wales. Cartland was openly critical of Diana’s subsequent divorce, though the rift between them was mended shortly before Diana’s fatal car crash in Paris in 1997.[5] According to Tina Brown’s book on the late Princess, Cartland once remarked, “The only books Diana ever read were mine, and they weren’t awfully good for her.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tina_Brown

    *NOTE* EVANS*

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helen_Gurley_Brown

  6. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harold_Evans

    Sir Harold Matthew Evans (born 28 June 1928) is a British-born journalist and writer who was editor of The Sunday Times from 1967 to 1981. He has written various books on history and journalism. Since 2001, Evans has served as editor-at-large of The Week Magazine and since 2005, he has been a contributor to The Guardian and BBC Radio 4.

    On 13 June 2011 Sir Harold Evans was appointed editor-at-large of the Reuters news agency

    http://www.ibtimes.com/tina-brown-sad-moment-has-arrived-layoffs-begin-newsweek-928219

  7. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gordon_Brown

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerry_Brown

    Spouse(s) Anne Gust

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_Brothers_Harriman_%26_Co.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little,_Brown_and_Company

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Little

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_M._Young

    Arthur Middleton Young (November 3, 1905 – May 30, 1995) was an American inventor, helicopter pioneer, cosmologist, philosopher, astrologer and author. Young was the designer of Bell Helicopter’s first helicopter, the Model 30, and inventor of the stabilizer bar used on many of Bell’s early helicopter designs. He founded the “Institute for the Study of Consciousness” in Berkeley in 1972. Young advocated a process theory, which is a form of integral theory. These theories attempt to integrate the realm of human thought and experience with the realm of science so that the concept of universe is not limited to that which can be physically measured. Young’s theory embraces evolution and the concept of the great chain of being. He has influenced such thinkers as Stanislav Grof and Laban Coblentz.

    Arthur was the son of Eliza Coxe (1875–1950) and Philadelphia landscape painter Charles Morris Young (1869–1964). He was interested in developing a comprehensive theory of reality from an early age. He felt that to acquire the intellectual tools needed for such rigorous study, he should first develop an understanding of mathematics and engineering. With this decision he was following a career path similar to that of philosopher Alfred North Whitehead, who was a mathematician before he developed the first process philosophy. Thus after graduation from Princeton University in 1927 Young searched for a suitable invention to develop. In 1928 he returned to his father’s farm in Radnor, Pennsylvania, to begin twelve solitary years of efforts to develop the helicopter into a useful device.

    Young’s private experiments with helicopter design had mostly involved small scale models. After twelve years on his own using the models, he took his results and models to the Bell Aircraft Company in Buffalo, New York, in 1941, and the company agreed to build full-scale prototypes. While war was looming for the USA in late 1941 he was issued the key rotor stabilizer bar (also known as a flybar) patent, assigned it to Bell and moved to Buffalo to work with them. In June 1942 he moved his five-person team to Gardenville, New York, a hamlet on the north border of West Seneca, New York, where they could work in relative secrecy. The first test flight of the prototype Model 30 occurred in July 1943, and on March 8, 1946 the company received Helicopter Type Certificate H-1 for the world’s first commercial helicopter, the Bell Model 47. This was the “whirlybird” featured in the M*A*S*H movie and television series and was so successful that it continued to be manufactured through 1974. A design as well as a utilitarian success, it was added to the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art of New York in 1984.

    Young had become profoundly disturbed by the development of nuclear weapons at the end of the Second World War and decided that humanity needed a new philosophical paradigm.

    In August 1946 Young recorded in his notes the idea of the psychopter— the helicopter as the “winged self”, a metaphor for the human spirit.[1] By October 1947 Young felt his work at Bell was complete, and he turned to the next phase of his career as a philosopher of mind (or soul). In 1949, the Franklin Institute awarded him the Edward Longstreth Medal.[2] In 1952, Young and his wife Ruth organized the Foundation for the Study of Consciousness in Philadelphia, the forerunner of the Institute for the Study of Consciousness.

    [edit] MarriagesYoung married Priscilla Page in 1933. He was divorced from Priscilla in 1948, and later that year, married artist Ruth Forbes (1903–1998) of the Boston Forbes family, a great-granddaughter of Ralph Waldo Emerson and the mother of Michael Paine.

    [edit] DeathOn 30 May 1995, Arthur Young died of cancer at age 89, at his home in Berkeley, California
    Arthur Middleton Young
    Born 3 November 1905 (1905-11-03)
    Paris, France
    Died 30 May 1995 (1995-05-31)
    Berkeley, California
    Spouse(s) Priscilla Page
    Ruth Forbes

  8. Renee says:

    Again;

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Spencer-Churchill,_11th_Duke_of_Marlborough

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_Vanderbilt_Field

    Frederick Vanderbilt Field (April 13, 1905 – February 1, 2000) was an American leftist political activist and a great-great-grandson of railroad tycoon Cornelius “Commodore” Vanderbilt, disinherited by his wealthy relatives for his radical political views. Field became a specialist on Asia and was a prime staff member and supporter of the Institute of Pacific Relations. He also supported so many openly Communist organizations that he was accused of being a member of the Communist Party,[1] and was a top target of the American government during the peak of 1950s McCarthyism. Field denied ever having been a party member, but admitted in his memoirs that “I suppose I was what the Party called a ‘member at large.

    The IPR was the result of two sets of organizers, one in New York, another in Hawai’i. The New York based effort was organized by Edward C. Carter, Carter, after graduating from Harvard in 1906, joined the Student Volunteer Movement with the YMCA in India, then worked with the Y in France during World War I. After the war he joined The Inquiry, a liberal Protestant commission with a flavor both genteel and militant which organized conferences and publications on labor, race relations, business ethics, and international peace. Among Carter’s constituents were John D. Rockefeller, III, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, daughter of the Rhode Island U.S. Senator, and Dr. Ray Lyman Wilbur, President of Stanford University. Wilbur argued that a new organization devoted to Pacific affairs would fill a gap not addressed by East Coast foreign policy groups. Meanwhile, in Hawai’i, another group was organizing under the leadership of local business interests.

    Not everyone approved. Time magazine called Carter, Wilbur, and The Inquiry a “strange and motley crew,” a “little band of élite and erudite adventurers.” Some in the American State Department and Navy opposed discussion of Pacific affairs, fearing that it might interfere with strategic planning at a time when Chinese and Japanese nationalism were on the rise. Carter countered with support from the Rockefeller Foundation and the Carnegie Foundation. Using networks of the International YMCA, independent National Councils were organized in other countries, with an International Secretariat in Honolulu.[2]

    The first conference was held in Honolulu in the summer of 1925, followed by another in Honolulu (1927), then conferences in Kyoto (1929), Hangzhou and Shanghai (1931), Banff, Canada (1933), Yosemite, USA (1936), and Virginia Beach, USA (1939). Each conference published its background papers and roundtable discussions in a volume in the series Problems of the Pacific.

    Edward Carter took responsibility for the American Council. When he became Secretary General in 1933 he lobbied successfully to have the International Headquarters move to New York. Since 1928 his chief assistant had been Frederick V. Field, who worked with him until 1940. (Field was later attacked for his Communist allegiances: see below.) The American Council moved energetically on several fronts. One of Carter’s concerns was that public opinion needed to be informed and school curriculum deepened. Another area was to commission or subsidize scholarship on all aspects of Asia. Over the next decades, the IPR imprint appeared on hundreds of books, including most of the important scholarship on China, Japan, and Southeast Asia. Notable was the Chinese Dynastic History Project, headed by the German refugee scholar Karl Wittfogel, which set out to translate and annotate the official histories compiled by each Chinese dynasty for its predecessor. In 1932, the IPR determined to expand its Bulletin into a full-fledged journal, Pacific Affairs. At the recommendation of longtime treaty port journalist H.G.E. Woodhead, Carter recruited Owen Lattimore, a multi-sided scholar of Central Asia who, however, did not have a Ph.D.[3]

    The IPR aimed to include all of the countries of the Pacific, including colonies, such as the Philippines and Korea (the Dutch government forbade participation from the Dutch East Indies), and the Soviet Union. As friction between Japan and China became more intense, the IPR became more overtly political. In 1931, the Japanese invasion forced the conference to move from Hangzhou to Shanghai. In 1932, the Japanese delegation withdrew and succeeding conferences were held without Japanese representation. Since the USSR was a longtime rival of Japan and a revolutionary Marxist power, Soviet participation raised many questions and problems. Marxist analysis, such as that brought by Wittfogel, was considered by some to add a powerful tool for understanding Chinese history, but Stalin’s interest was scarcely limited to discussions and theories. Carter’s sympathy for the Soviet Union led him to defend Stalin’s purges and trials, although IPR publications contained both favorable and critical treatments of Soviet policies.[4]

    The IPR sponsored other important scholarly excursions into Asian history and society. R.H. Tawney’s long memo for the 1931 Conference was published as his Land and Labor in China (1931). A Marxist analysis of geography by Chi Ch’ao-ting. And the collaboration between Lattimore and Wittfogel which used an eclectic array of approaches including Arnold Toynbee, Ellsworth Huntington, and Karl Marx to develop a social history of China.[5]

    [edit] The War YearsDuring the war the IPR organized two conferences, one at Mont Tremblant, Quebec, in December 1942 and the second in Hot Springs, Virginia in January 1945. One scholar noted that the non-official nature of these meetings meant that officials and influential leaders could join in the fray in an ostensibly private capacity, which “gave the I.P.R. a status well beyond its actual size.” [6] Colonial issues, economic issues and post-war planning were the major areas of controversy. The Americans demanded that European colonial markets be opened to American goods by the removal of preference tariffs while the British expressed concerns that that American economic might could be used as a “potential bludgeon.”[7] Another example was Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit of India, asserting that the conflict in Asia was a race war, and other members of the conference from Asia warned that too harsh a treatment of Japan would lead to anti-Western feeling throughout the Far East.

    At the roundtables, there was criticism as well as doubt that British would follow the Atlantic Charter. The British pointed out that high-flown ideas were being pushed on them while American willingness to apply the same ideals within its own borders was questionable. Those in the International Secretariat, were suspicious and critical of the British, noting that the delegation from India was more British than the British. Americans repeatedly insisted that they were not fighting in order to reconstitute the British Empire; British replied that they would “not be hustled out of evolution into revolution” and that the US might “do well to look into her own Negro problem.”

    On the positive side, the conferences helped to focus on the political and social developments within Japan after the war, especially the question of whether to abolish the imperial throne. Edward Carter summarized Anglo-American differences and fears: “continuing imperialism as a threat to world peace,” on the one hand, and of “anti-colonialism as a recipe for chaos” on the other, and of “imperial tariff protections as a barrier to world trade and of American economic might as a potential bludgeon.” Some have suggested that Carter left the Secretary General position in late 1945 because of pressure from the European council leaders due to his increasingly outspoken anti-colonialism.[8]

    At home, the American Secretariat came under criticism.

    [edit] Attack Over Communist Influences and DemiseToward the end of the war, the Institute came under criticism for alleged communist sympathies. The first major criticism of the Institute was a wartime study by dissident IPR member Alfred Kohlberg, an American who had owned a textile firm in prewar China. After finding what he believed were Communist sympathies in IPR, in particular Frederick Field, Kohlberg first wrote to other members of the Board, published an 80-page report, then launched a publicity campaign against the Institute.[9]

    The IPR came under further suspicion by government authorities as a result of the Venona intercepts and its close association with Amerasia. Amerasia came under investigation when a classified government OSS report appeared as an article in the magazine.

    IPR was closely allied with Amerasia. The two organizations shared the same building, and many members of the Editorial Board of Amerasia were officers or employees of IPR.[10] An FBI review of Amerasia and IPR publications found that approximately 115 people contributed articles to both.[11]

    Among IPR staffers identified later as Communists or collaborators with Soviet intelligence agents were Kathleen Barnes, Hilda Austern, Elsie Fairfax-Cholmely, Chi Chao-ting, Guenter Stein, Harriet Levine, Talitha Gerlach, Chen Han-seng (a member of the Sorge spy ring),[12] Michael Greenberg (named as a source in 1945 by defecting Soviet courier Elizabeth Bentley), and T.A. Bisson (Venona’s “Arthur”),[13] as well as Kate Mitchell and Andrew Roth, both of whom were arrested in the 1945 Amerasia case.[14]

    After the success of the Chinese Communist Revolution, criticism of the IPR increased. Its detractors accused it of having helped to “lose China” to Communism.

    In the early fifties, the IPR came under a lengthy investigation by the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee. Critics charged that IPR scholars had been naïve in their statements regarding Communism, Chinese Communism and Stalinist Russia.

    Senator Joseph McCarthy of Wisconsin repeatedly criticized IPR and its former chairman Philip Jessup. McCarthy observed that Frederick V. Field, T.A. Bisson, and Owen Lattimore were active in IPR and claimed that they had worked to turn American China policy in favor of the Communist Party of China.

    In 1952, the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee (SISS), chaired by Senator Pat McCarran, spent over a year reviewing some 20,000 documents from the files of IPR and questioning IPR personnel. The committee found it suspicious that Marxists had published articles in the IPR journal and that Communists had attended an IPR conference in 1942. In its final report the SISS stated:

    “ The IPR itself was like a specialized political flypaper in its attractive power for Communists …The IPR has been considered by the American Communist Party and by Soviet officials as an instrument of Communist policy, propaganda and military intelligence. The IPR disseminated and sought to popularize false information including information originating from Soviet and Communist sources…. The IPR was a vehicle used by the Communists to orient American far eastern policies toward Communist objectives.[15] ”

    Elizabeth Bentley testified that NKVD spy chief Jacob Golos warned her to stay away from the IPR because it was “as red as a rose, and you shouldn’t touch it with a 10-foot pole.”[16] Likewise, Louis Budenz, former editor of the Daily Worker, testified that Alexander Trachtenberg of the Communist Party-affiliated International Publishers told him that party leaders thought the IPR was “too much a concentration point for Communists; the control could be maintained without such a galaxy of Communists in it.”[17]

    The IPR lost its tax-exempt status as an educational body in 1955, when the Internal Revenue Service alleged that the Institute had engaged in the dissemination of controversial and partisan propaganda, and had attempted to influence the policies or opinions of the government. Under the leadership of William L. Holland, the IPR pursued a long legal action to regain tax-exempt status lasted until 1959. The final court judgment rejected all allegations by the Internal Revenue Service.[18]

    By the mid-1950s, the IPR was facing other challenges – notably the development of well-funded centers for Asian Studies at major American Universities such as Harvard, Yale, Berkeley, Michigan and Columbia. The rise of these centers created an opinion that the IPR was no longer necessary. The large foundations which had previously supported the IPR shifted their financial resources to the University centers.[19]

    At the end of the IRS case, a degree of financial support that the Institute had attracted due to free speech issues and the IRS case was lost to other causes. The IPR also had been gradually losing academic contributors due in part to the rise of the Association for Asian Studies.[20]

    The Institute dissolved in 1960. Publication of the journal Pacific Affairs was transferred to University of British Columbia, in Vancouver, Canada.

    A few years later two successor organizations were established, the Pacific Basin Economic Council, an organization of regional business leaders founded in 1967, and the more academic Pacific Trade and Development Conference (PAFTAD) in 1968.

  9. Renee says:

    http://www.thepeerage.com/p17063.htm

    Gertrude Vanderbilt1
    F, #170621, b. 1875, d. 1942

    Gertrude Vanderbilt|b. 1875\nd. 1942|p17063.htm#i170621|Cornelius Vanderbilt II|b. 27 Nov 1843\nd. 12 Sep 1899|p17060.htm#i170600|Alice Claypoole Gwynne|b. 1845\nd. 1934|p17061.htm#i170601|William H. Vanderbilt|b. 8 May 1821\nd. 8 Dec 1885|p17060.htm#i170597|Maria L. Kissam|b. 1821\nd. 1896|p17060.htm#i170598|||||||

    Last Edited=16 Nov 2007
    Gertrude Vanderbilt was born in 1875.1 She was the daughter of Cornelius Vanderbilt II and Alice Claypoole Gwynne.1 She married Harry Payne Whitney, son of Hon. William Collins Whitney and Flora Payne.1 She died in 1942.1 She was buried at The Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, New York City, New York, U.S.A..2
    Her married name became Whitney.1
    Children of Gertrude Vanderbilt and Harry Payne Whitney
    Flora Payne Whitney2
    Barbara Whitney2
    Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney+2 b. 20 Feb 1899, d. 13 Dec 1992
    Citations
    [S1122] Peerage News, online http://peeragenews.blogspot.co.nz/. Hereinafter cited as Peerage News.
    [S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
    Harry Payne Whitney1
    M, #170622, b. 29 April 1872, d. 26 October 1930

    Harry Payne Whitney|b. 29 Apr 1872\nd. 26 Oct 1930|p17063.htm#i170622|Hon. William Collins Whitney|b. 5 Jul 1841\nd. 2 Feb 1904|p873.htm#i8724|Flora Payne||p873.htm#i8725|General James S. Whitney||p25177.htm#i251764|Laurinda Collins||p25177.htm#i251765|Hon. Henry B. Payne||p873.htm#i8730||||

    Last Edited=17 Nov 2007
    Harry Payne Whitney was born on 29 April 1872 at New York City, New York, U.S.A..1,2 He was the son of Hon. William Collins Whitney and Flora Payne.2 He married Gertrude Vanderbilt, daughter of Cornelius Vanderbilt II and Alice Claypoole Gwynne.1 He died on 26 October 1930 at age 58.1,2 He was buried at The Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, New York City, New York, U.S.A..2
    He was educated at Groton School, Groton, Massachusetts, U.S.A..2 He graduated from Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, U.S.A., in 1894.2
    Children of Harry Payne Whitney and Gertrude Vanderbilt
    Flora Payne Whitney2
    Barbara Whitney2
    Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney+2 b. 20 Feb 1899, d. 13 Dec 1992
    Citations
    [S1122] Peerage News, online http://peeragenews.blogspot.co.nz/. Hereinafter cited as Peerage News.
    [S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
    Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt1
    M, #170623, b. 1880, d. 1925

    Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt|b. 1880\nd. 1925|p17063.htm#i170623|Cornelius Vanderbilt II|b. 27 Nov 1843\nd. 12 Sep 1899|p17060.htm#i170600|Alice Claypoole Gwynne|b. 1845\nd. 1934|p17061.htm#i170601|William H. Vanderbilt|b. 8 May 1821\nd. 8 Dec 1885|p17060.htm#i170597|Maria L. Kissam|b. 1821\nd. 1896|p17060.htm#i170598|||||||

    Last Edited=20 Nov 2007
    Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt was born in 1880.2 He was the son of Cornelius Vanderbilt II and Alice Claypoole Gwynne.2 He married Gloria Laura Mercedes Morgan, daughter of Harry Hays Morgan and Laura Delphine Kilpatrick, in 1923.2 He died in 1925.2
    Child of Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt and Gloria Laura Mercedes Morgan
    Gloria Laura Madeleine Sophie Vanderbilt+2 b. 20 Feb 1924
    Citations
    [S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
    [S1122] Peerage News, online http://peeragenews.blogspot.co.nz/. Hereinafter cited as Peerage News.
    Gloria Laura Mercedes Morgan1
    F, #170624, b. 23 August 1904, d. 13 February 1965

    Gloria Laura Mercedes Morgan|b. 23 Aug 1904\nd. 13 Feb 1965|p17063.htm#i170624|Harry Hays Morgan||p25303.htm#i253030|Laura Delphine Kilpatrick||p25304.htm#i253031|Philip H. Morgan||p25304.htm#i253040||||Maj.-Gen. Hugh J. Kilpatrick|b. 14 Jan 1836\nd. 4 Dec 1881|p25304.htm#i253032|Luisa Valdivieso Araoz||p25304.htm#i253033|

    Last Edited=20 Nov 2007
    Gloria Laura Mercedes Morgan was born on 23 August 1904 at Lucerne, Switzerland.1 She was the daughter of Harry Hays Morgan and Laura Delphine Kilpatrick.1 She married Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt, son of Cornelius Vanderbilt II and Alice Claypoole Gwynne, in 1923.2 She died on 13 February 1965 at age 60.1 She was buried at Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California, U.S.A..1
    From 1923, her married name became Vanderbilt.2
    Child of Gloria Laura Mercedes Morgan and Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt
    Gloria Laura Madeleine Sophie Vanderbilt+2 b. 20 Feb 1924
    Citations
    [S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
    [S1122] Peerage News, online http://peeragenews.blogspot.co.nz/. Hereinafter cited as Peerage News.
    Gloria Laura Madeleine Sophie Vanderbilt1
    F, #170625, b. 20 February 1924

    Gloria Laura Madeleine Sophie Vanderbilt|b. 20 Feb 1924|p17063.htm#i170625|Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt|b. 1880\nd. 1925|p17063.htm#i170623|Gloria Laura Mercedes Morgan|b. 23 Aug 1904\nd. 13 Feb 1965|p17063.htm#i170624|Cornelius Vanderbilt II|b. 27 Nov 1843\nd. 12 Sep 1899|p17060.htm#i170600|Alice C. Gwynne|b. 1845\nd. 1934|p17061.htm#i170601|Harry H. Morgan||p25303.htm#i253030|Laura D. Kilpatrick||p25304.htm#i253031|

    Last Edited=20 Nov 2007

    Glora Vanderbilt 1 Gloria Laura Madeleine Sophie Vanderbilt was born on 20 February 1924 at New York City, New York, U.S.A..1 She is the daughter of Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt and Gloria Laura Mercedes Morgan.2 She married, firstly, Pasquale DiCicco in 1941.1 She and Pasquale DiCicco were divorced in 1945.1 She married, secondly, Leopold Stokowski, son of Kopernik Jozef Boleslawowicz Stokowski and Annie Marion Moore, on 21 April 1945.1 She and Leopold Stokowski were divorced in October 1955.1 She married, thirdly, Sidney Lumet, son of Baruch Lumet and Eugenius Wermus, on 28 August 1956.1 She and Sidney Lumet were divorced in August 1963.1 She married, fourthly, Wyatt Emory Cooper on 24 December 1963.1
    She was educated at Miss Porter’s School, Farmington, Connecticut, U.S.A..1 She was educated at Art Students League, New York City, New York, U.S.A..1 She was an artist, and sponsor of her designer label.1 She wrote the book Once Upon a Time: A True Story, published 1986.1 She wrote the book Black Night, White Night: A Mother’s Story, published 1987.1 She wrote the book It Seemed Important at the Time: A Romance Memoir, published 2004.1 She wrote the book The Memory Book of Starr Faithfull.1
    Children of Gloria Laura Madeleine Sophie Vanderbilt and Leopold Stokowski
    Leopold Stanislaus Stokowski1 b. 1950
    Christopher Stokowski1 b. 1952
    Children of Gloria Laura Madeleine Sophie Vanderbilt and Wyatt Emory Cooper
    Carter Vanderbilt Cooper1 b. 1965, d. 22 Jul 1988
    Anderson Hays Cooper1 b. 1967
    Citations
    [S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
    [S1122] Peerage News, online http://peeragenews.blogspot.co.nz/. Hereinafter cited as Peerage News.

    William Kissam Vanderbilt, Jr.1
    M, #170626, b. 1878, d. 1944

    William Kissam Vanderbilt, Jr.|b. 1878\nd. 1944|p17063.htm#i170626|William Kissam Vanderbilt|b. 1849\nd. 22 Jul 1920|p10354.htm#i103538|Alva Erskine Smith|b. 17 Jan 1853\nd. 26 Jan 1933|p17061.htm#i170603|William H. Vanderbilt|b. 8 May 1821\nd. 8 Dec 1885|p17060.htm#i170597|Maria L. Kissam|b. 1821\nd. 1896|p17060.htm#i170598|Murray F. Smith||p17061.htm#i170604|Phoebe Desha||p17061.htm#i170605|

    Last Edited=15 Oct 2005
    William Kissam Vanderbilt, Jr. was born in 1878.1 He was the son of William Kissam Vanderbilt and Alva Erskine Smith.1 He married, firstly, Virginia Graham Fair.1 He married, secondly, Rosamund Lancaster Warburton.1 He died in 1944.1
    Child of William Kissam Vanderbilt, Jr. and Virginia Graham Fair
    William Kissam Vanderbilt III1 b. 1907, d. 1933
    Citations
    [S1122] Peerage News, online http://peeragenews.blogspot.co.nz/. Hereinafter cited as Peerage News.
    Virginia Graham Fair1
    F, #170627

    Last Edited=15 Oct 2005
    Virginia Graham Fair married William Kissam Vanderbilt, Jr., son of William Kissam Vanderbilt and Alva Erskine Smith.1
    Her married name became Vanderbilt.1
    Child of Virginia Graham Fair and William Kissam Vanderbilt, Jr.
    William Kissam Vanderbilt III1 b. 1907, d. 1933
    Citations
    [S1122] Peerage News, online http://peeragenews.blogspot.co.nz/. Hereinafter cited as Peerage News.
    Rosamund Lancaster Warburton1
    F, #170628, b. 1897, d. 1947

    Last Edited=15 Oct 2005
    Rosamund Lancaster Warburton was born in 1897.1 She married William Kissam Vanderbilt, Jr., son of William Kissam Vanderbilt and Alva Erskine Smith.1 She died in 1947.1
    Her married name became Vanderbilt.1
    Citations
    [S1122] Peerage News, online http://peeragenews.blogspot.co.nz/. Hereinafter cited as Peerage News.
    William Kissam Vanderbilt III1
    M, #170629, b. 1907, d. 1933

    William Kissam Vanderbilt III|b. 1907\nd. 1933|p17063.htm#i170629|William Kissam Vanderbilt, Jr.|b. 1878\nd. 1944|p17063.htm#i170626|Virginia Graham Fair||p17063.htm#i170627|William K. Vanderbilt|b. 1849\nd. 22 Jul 1920|p10354.htm#i103538|Alva E. Smith|b. 17 Jan 1853\nd. 26 Jan 1933|p17061.htm#i170603|||||||

    Last Edited=15 Oct 2005
    William Kissam Vanderbilt III was born in 1907.1 He was the son of William Kissam Vanderbilt, Jr. and Virginia Graham Fair.1 He died in 1933.1
    Citations
    [S1122] Peerage News, online http://peeragenews.blogspot.co.nz/. Hereinafter cited as Peerage News.
    Harold Stirling Vanderbilt1
    M, #170630, d. 1970

    Harold Stirling Vanderbilt|d. 1970|p17063.htm#i170630|William Kissam Vanderbilt|b. 1849\nd. 22 Jul 1920|p10354.htm#i103538|Alva Erskine Smith|b. 17 Jan 1853\nd. 26 Jan 1933|p17061.htm#i170603|William H. Vanderbilt|b. 8 May 1821\nd. 8 Dec 1885|p17060.htm#i170597|Maria L. Kissam|b. 1821\nd. 1896|p17060.htm#i170598|Murray F. Smith||p17061.htm#i170604|Phoebe Desha||p17061.htm#i170605|

    Last Edited=15 Oct 2005
    Harold Stirling Vanderbilt was the son of William Kissam Vanderbilt and Alva Erskine Smith.1 He married Gertrude L. Conway.1 He died in 1970.

  10. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Order_of_the_Holy_Sepulchre

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_nobility

    Mexican nobility refers to the titled nobles and untitled gentry families of Mexico.[1] Most of the descendants of these families still live in Mexico today, but some can be found in Europe and other countries.

    With the victories of the Mexican republics over the Mexican monarchies of the First Mexican Empire, headed by Agustín I, of the House of Itúrbide, and the Second Mexican Empire, under Maximilian I, of the House of Habsburg — and the writing of the Mexican Constitution of 1917 — titles of nobility in Mexico were legally abolished.

    From the pre-Hispanic era, and stretching from the viceregal and colonial periods under the Habsburgs and Bourbons, to the First and Second Mexican Empires and beyond, these families played vital roles in the history of Mexico. There are several periods in Mexico’s modern history in which families were granted noble status and given titles. While titles were granted in Mexico itself, other families brought with them their old titles from Europe.

    Mexicans who by marriage to titled foreigners or through outright purchase, acquired titles of nobility from European countries excluding Vatican. These were primarily Italian and German titles, with some rare exceptions of the Spain.

    At the beginning of the nineteenth century, the Mexican nobility—both titled and untitled—consisted of approximately 1.5% of Mexico’s population, or approximately 200,000 individuals.[2] Signers of the Mexican Declaration of Independence included: the Marqués de San Juan de Rayas, the Marqués de Salvatierra, the Marqués de Salinas del Río Pisuerga, the Conde de Santa María de Regla, the Marqués de la Cadena, the Marqués de San Miguel de Aguayo, among others. Leading families active in 18th c. and 19th c. politics, the economy, the clergy, arts and culture included: Cervantes, Romero de Terreros, Rincón Gallardo, Pérez Gálvez, Rul, Vivanco, Canal, Cañedo, Fernández de Jáuregui, Obando, Fernández de Córdoba, Gómez de Parada, Pérez de Salazar, Valdivieso, Fagoaga, Echeverz, Dávalos de Bracamonte, Castañiza, Gómez de la Cortina, Moncada, Diez de Sollano, de Busto y Moya, Reynoso y Manso de Zúñiga, López de Zárate, Caserta, Trebuesto, García de Teruel, Vizcarra, Rábago, Sardaneta, Ozta, Fco. Azcárate y Ledesma, Molina Flores, Samaniego del Castillo, Cosío, Rivadeneyra, de la Cotera, de Campa, Rodríguez Sáenz de Pedroso, Padilla, Rivascacho, Villar-Villamil, Rodríguez Rico, Sánchez de Tagle, Cabrero, Hurtado de Mendoza, López-Portillo, Meade, García Pimentel, Vasconcelos, Sainz Trápaga, Lascurain, Villaurrutia, Errazu, Escandón, Yturbe, Yermo, Béistegui, and Sánchez-Navarro, among others.[3]

    Historically, many of these Mexican families married into European nobility and some of these unions have produced figures such as Rainier III, Prince of Monaco and Elena Poniatowska, who was a descendent of a brother of Stanislaw August Poniatowski the last King of Poland. Other families who have married into European nobility include the Gutiérrez de Estradas, and the Itúrbides—the Head of the Imperial House of Mexico in exile, Maximilian von Götzen-Itúrbide, is married to a member of the Venetian and Croatian nobility.

    [edit] Indigenous nobility
    Moctezuma II’s royal descendants were granted titles in Mexico and Spain.The Aztecs and other Indigenous peoples in Mexico had a system of hereditary aristocracy in place when the Spanish arrived in Mexico. The Spaniards respected this system and added to it, resulting in many unions between Aztec and Spanish nobility. Descendents of the elites of pre-Columbian Mexico who received these distinctions included the heirs of the Aztec ruler Moctezuma II; That family became known as the Condes de Moctezuma, and later, the Duques of Moctezuma de Tultengo. The holders of the title, who still reside in Spain, became part of the Spanish peerage in 1766 when they received a Grandeza. A branch of their family, on the female side, continued to receive an annual payment from the Mexican government in the amount of some 500 Ducats, gold, until 1938, as part of a contract signed in the 16th c. granting Mexico City access to water and lumber on family property.

    Some families of pure Amerindian ancestry, such as the Mixtec Villagómez family, were among the richest landowners in New Spain after the conquest of the Aztec empire. Despite being part of the colonial elite after the conquest, the Villagómez retained their Mixtec identity, speaking the Mixtec language and keeping a collection of Mixtec codices.

    Numerous other Indigenous elites collaborated with the conquest, earning noble titles and privileges. Most notably, all the Tlaxcallans, who resettled into northern Mexico, became hidalgos.

    [edit] Titles in Viceregal Mexico and the First Mexican EmpireFamilies who received a título de Castilla during the Colonial period were the first to be granted European noble titles in New Spain (Mexico). One of the first was the Conquistador Hernán Cortés, who was granted the title of the Marqués del Valle de Oaxaca. Approximately 130 such titles were held by Spaniards born or resident in New Spain. Main centers of population included Mexico City, Puebla, Querétaro, San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato, Guadalajara, and Morelia (Valladolid).

    At independence, a few princely dignities were accorded the Imperial family’s relations and three titles of nobility—the latter already under application with the Spanish government—were recognized by the Congress of the First Mexican Empire, such as the Marqués de Samaniego del Castillo. Knighthoods were also created, most notably, of Guadalupe. Over the nineteenth century, others received pontifical titles of nobility, and through loopholes in Spanish law, had these titles recognized as títulos de Castilla; these are known as títulos negros and include the titles of the marqués de Barrón, conde de Subervielle, conde del Valle (Fernández del Valle family), duquesa de Mier, and others. Many of these families were part of the hidalgo class. Some families, after Mexican Independence, received títulos de Castilla from the Spanish monarch directly, such as the duque de Regla and the duquesa de Prim, or indirectly, through marriage to individuals holding these titles, such as the duque de Castroterreño or the Escandón family members who subsequently became duques de Montellano, marqueses de Villavieja.

    Empress Ana María, consort of Agustin I of Mexico, belonged to the House of Tagle of the family of the Marquises of Altamira.[edit] First Republic and the Second Mexican EmpireMany families received titles of nobility from the regencies and/or congresses of the First or Second Empire. Afterwards, during the Second Mexican Empire, under Maximilian I of Mexico of the House of Habsburg, the nobility was resurgent.

    Some of these families granted titles during these periods were the Itúrbides—whose Basque ancestors had been ennobled by King Juan II of Aragon—, Samaniego del Castillos, and the Marquis de la Cadena.

    [edit] List of titles of nobility in MexicoMarques del Valle de Oaxaca 1529; Cortes
    Marques de Salinas de Río Pisuerga 1609; Altamirano de Velasco, Cervantes
    Conde de Santiago de Calimaya 1616; Altamirano de Velasco, Cervantes
    Marques de Villamayor de las Ibernías 1617; Pacheco
    Conde de Valle de Orizaba 1627; Rincón Gallardo
    Conde de Moctezuma 1627 G.E.; Moctezuma de la Cueva
    Marques de San Miguel de Aguayo 1683; Echevers
    Marques de Villar del Águila 1689; Urrutia
    Marques de Santa Fe de Guardiola 1691; Lopez de Peralta, Cervantes
    Marques de Altamira 1704; Sanchez de Tagle
    Marques de Sierra Nevada 1708 ; Ruiz de Tagle
    Marques de Salvatierra 1708; Cervantes
    Duque de Atrisco 1708 G.E ; Sarmiento, Romay-Sotomayor
    Conde de Ledesma de la Fuente 1710
    Marques de Villa Hermosa de Alfaro 1711; Rincon-Gallardo
    Conde de San Mateo de Valparaíso 1727; ?
    Marques de Acapulco 1728; de la Cerda
    Marques de las Salinas 1733 ; Pérez de Tagle
    Conde de Revillagigedo 1749; Revillagigedo
    Marques de Rivascacho 1764; Cervantes
    Conde de Regla 1768; Romero de Terreros, Rincon-Gallardo
    Marques del Apartado 1772; Fagoaga, Campero
    Conde de la Presa de Jalpa 1775; Cervantes
    Marques de San Cristobal 1777; Romero de Terreros, Rincon-Gallardo
    Marques de San Francisco 1777; Romero de Terreros
    Conde de Heras-Soto 1811; Heras-Soto, Garcia-Pimentel
    [edit] Modern PeriodDuring the Porfiriato, members of the Mexican aristocracy were very active in politics. Prince Agustín de Iturbide y Green, Maximilian’s adopted son, was prompted by reactionaries into making public pronouncements against Díaz, who promptly exiled him after he served a brief sentence given him by a martial court[citation needed]. Don Agustín died in exile in the U.S., where he was a Spanish professor at Georgetown University. Members of the Rincón Gallardo, Fagoaga, and Pimentel families (marqués de Guadalupe, marqués del Apartado and conde de Heras Soto) were active in Mexico City government, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Senate, the armed forces, and the Academia de la Lengua or the Sociedad de Geografía e Historia. Many journeyed and lived abroad, often doing so in Paris, London, and Madrid. Most men studied at the Jesuit-run British public school, Stonyhurst College.

    Around 1902, Don Ricardo Ortega y Pérez Gallardo, Mexico’s unofficial King of Arms, commenced work on a project to prepare an encyclopedic repertoire of Mexico’s aristocracy. The resulting Historia genealógica de las familias más antiguas de México (Genealogical History of the Oldest Families of Mexico), an Almanach de Gotha of sorts, listed the histories of a select group of families residing in Mexico who held Habsburg, Bourbon, Mexican, and Pontifical titles and patents of nobility, entailments, and knighthoods; it also listed notables who had accepted honors from foreign sovereigns and republics.

    After the revolution, the nobility migrated to Mexico City in large numbers; many entered the professional and educated classes. A number found employment in the diplomatic service, arts and letters, public relations, and transnational corporations. A number of European nobles, bankrupted by the wars, resettled and intermarried in Mexico from the 1940s on, including the King of Romania. Art history and antiquities attracted many, such as the Marqués de San Francisco, don Manuel Romero de Terreros, among others. Monarchists organized masses for the repose of Maximilian well into the 20th century at the Church of La Profesa, and were kept under surveillance by the Ministry of the Interior. During Charles de Gaulle’s state visit to Mexico, many turned out for the receptions. Many of them greeted the arrival of the Royal Family in 1977—the first such visit in Mexico’s history—and purportedly feuded over the order of precedence at receptions. Pontifical orders of knighthood, as well as Independent orders, such as Malta, have chapters in Mexico. The most numerous is the Orden del Santo Sepulcro de Jerusalén with nearly 200 members organized into three chapters (Chihuahua, Guadalajara, and Mexico City).

    Wealthy Mexican families have attempted to obtain titles of nobility from Spain since the 1980s, when relations were re-established, but ran afoul of the law. The appeal of and fascination with the nobility in Mexico, without a doubt, has not subsided. Countless soap operas, novels, films, museum exhibits, and websites are devoted to the topic[citation needed].

    [edit] Current legal status of nobility in MexicoThe Political Constitution of Mexico expressly prohibits the state from recognizing (or granting) any nobility titles since 1917.[4] Therefore, nobility titles do not legally exist (therefore they are not forbidden) in Mexico. However, the same Mexican law do prohibit Mexicans from receiving any foreign condecoration without permission from the Congress of The Union.

  11. Renee says:

    houseofnames.com/valdivia-family-crest

    Valdiva, deValdiva, Valdiveso, Valdavielso, Valdevieso etc..

    Royal name. First found in NW Spain (Leon)

    See: Luisa Valdineso Araoz and Hugh Judson*

    Vanderbilt
    Sooper
    Demaupas
    Valdivieso

    divies

    Davies

    Davis

    Davos
    *http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princess_Lilian,_Duchess_of_Halland
    NOTE*DAVIES*

    Ralph K Davies of Standard Oil:

    http://hnn.us/articles/339.html

    http://www.amcolan.info/Patton/Patton.php

    Bartlett
    Bowles
    Coats
    Curtis
    Dutton
    England
    Graham
    Hearst
    Patton
    Rogers
    Rowe
    Starr
    Williamson

  12. Renee says:

    Araoz ?
    Soundex Code for Araoz = A620
    Other surnames sharing this Soundex Code:
    ARGUE | ARIS | ARRIES | AYARS | AYERS | AYORS | AYRES | AYRIS |

    • Renee says:

      Araoz/ Ayers*

      http://www.thepeerage.com/p25304.htm

      http://www.thepeerage.com/p25304.htm#i253033

      Luisa Valdivieso Araoz1
      F, #253033

      Last Edited=20 Nov 2007
      Luisa Valdivieso Araoz married Maj.-Gen. Hugh Judson Kilpatrick, son of Colonel Simon Kilpatrick and Julia Wickham.1
      Her married name became Kilpatrick.1
      Child of Luisa Valdivieso Araoz and Maj.-Gen. Hugh Judson Kilpatrick
      Laura Delphine Kilpatrick+1
      Citations
      [S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
      Thelma Morgan1
      F, #253034, b. 23 August 1904, d. 1970

      Thelma Morgan|b. 23 Aug 1904\nd. 1970|p25304.htm#i253034|Harry Hays Morgan||p25303.htm#i253030|Laura Delphine Kilpatrick||p25304.htm#i253031|Philip H. Morgan||p25304.htm#i253040||||Maj.-Gen. Hugh J. Kilpatrick|b. 14 Jan 1836\nd. 4 Dec 1881|p25304.htm#i253032|Luisa Valdivieso Araoz||p25304.htm#i253033|

      Last Edited=17 Nov 2008

      Thelma, Viscountess Furness 2 Thelma Morgan was born on 23 August 1904.1 She was the daughter of Harry Hays Morgan and Laura Delphine Kilpatrick.1 She married, firstly, James Converse before 1926.3 She married, secondly, Marmaduke Furness, 1st Viscount Furness on 27 June 1926.3 She and Marmaduke Furness, 1st Viscount Furness were divorced in 1933.3 She died in 1970.1
      From before 1926, her married name became Converse.3 From 27 June 1926, her married name became Furness.3
      Citations
      [S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
      [S300] Michael Rhodes, “re: Ernest Fawbert Collection,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 8 February. Hereinafter cited as “re: Ernest Fawbert Collection.”
      [S34] Peter Townend, editor, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 105th edition (London, U.K.: Burke’s Peerage Ltd, 1970), page 1056. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage, 105th ed.
      Consuelo Morgan1
      F, #253035

      Consuelo Morgan||p25304.htm#i253035|Harry Hays Morgan||p25303.htm#i253030|Laura Delphine Kilpatrick||p25304.htm#i253031|Philip H. Morgan||p25304.htm#i253040||||Maj.-Gen. Hugh J. Kilpatrick|b. 14 Jan 1836\nd. 4 Dec 1881|p25304.htm#i253032|Luisa Valdivieso Araoz||p25304.htm#i253033|

      Last Edited=20 Nov 2007
      Consuelo Morgan is the daughter of Harry Hays Morgan and Laura Delphine Kilpatrick.1
      Citations
      [S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

      James Converse1
      M, #253036

      Last Edited=20 Nov 2007
      James Converse married Thelma Morgan, daughter of Harry Hays Morgan and Laura Delphine Kilpatrick, before 1926.1
      Citations
      [S34] Peter Townend, editor, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 105th edition (London, U.K.: Burke’s Peerage Ltd, 1970), page 1056. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage, 105th ed.
      Harry Hays Morgan1
      M, #253037

      Harry Hays Morgan||p25304.htm#i253037|Harry Hays Morgan||p25303.htm#i253030|Laura Delphine Kilpatrick||p25304.htm#i253031|Philip H. Morgan||p25304.htm#i253040||||Maj.-Gen. Hugh J. Kilpatrick|b. 14 Jan 1836\nd. 4 Dec 1881|p25304.htm#i253032|Luisa Valdivieso Araoz||p25304.htm#i253033|

      Last Edited=20 Nov 2007
      Harry Hays Morgan is the son of Harry Hays Morgan and Laura Delphine Kilpatrick.1
      He was an actor.1
      Citations
      [S34] Peter Townend, editor, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 105th edition (London, U.K.: Burke’s Peerage Ltd, 1970), page 1056. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage, 105th ed.
      Colonel Simon Kilpatrick1
      M, #253038

      Last Edited=20 Nov 2007
      Colonel Simon Kilpatrick married Julia Wickham.1
      Child of Colonel Simon Kilpatrick and Julia Wickham
      Maj.-Gen. Hugh Judson Kilpatrick+1 b. 14 Jan 1836, d. 4 Dec 1881
      Citations
      [S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
      Julia Wickham1
      F, #253039

      Last Edited=20 Nov 2007
      Julia Wickham married Colonel Simon Kilpatrick.1
      Her married name became Kilpatrick.1
      Child of Julia Wickham and Colonel Simon Kilpatrick
      Maj.-Gen. Hugh Judson Kilpatrick+1 b. 14 Jan 1836, d. 4 Dec 1881
      Citations
      [S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
      Philip Hickey Morgan1
      M, #253040

      Last Edited=20 Nov 2007
      Philip Hickey Morgan held the office of U.S. Ambassador to Mexico.1
      Child of Philip Hickey Morgan
      Harry Hays Morgan+1
      Citations
      [S252] Obituaries, Time magazine, unknown location, June 27, 1927. Hereinafter cited as Time magazine

  13. Renee says:

    Ayers ?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ronald_Ferguson

    Jump to: navigation, search
    Ronald Ferguson
    Born 10 October 1931 (1931-10-10)
    Died 16 March 2003 (2003-03-17) (aged 71)
    Spouse(s) Susan Barrantes (m. 1956–div. 1974)
    Susan Deptford (m. 1975–wid. 2003)
    Children Jane Ferguson (b.1957)
    Sarah Ferguson (b.1959)
    Andrew Ferguson (b.1978)
    Alice Ferguson (b.1980)
    Eliza Ferguson (b.1985)
    Major Ronald Ivor Ferguson (10 October 1931 – 16 March 2003) was the father of Sarah, Duchess of York, former wife to The Duke of York. He is the maternal grandfather of Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie of York. Major Ferguson was polo manager, initially to the The Duke of Edinburgh and later, for many years, to The Prince of Wales.

    Ronald Ferguson was the second son of Andrew Henry Ferguson (1899–1966) and his wife Lady Marian Louisa Montagu Douglas Scott (1908–1996), a first cousin of Lady Alice Montagu Douglas Scott, who became (after her wedding to Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester) Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester and an aunt-by-marriage of Elizabeth II. His grandfather was Lieutenant-Colonel Lord Herbert Montagu Douglas Scott, son of Sir William Montagu Douglas Scott, 6th Duke of Buccleuch and Lady Louisa Jane Hamilton. An elder brother, John, died at 10 years of age from peritonitis. He was born in London and grew up at Dummer Down Farm, his later home in adulthood, at Dummer, near Basingstoke in Hampshire. He attended Eton College and Sandhurst, and entered the Life Guards in 1952,[1] the regiment of which his father had previously been Colonel.[2] In 1954 Ferguson was promoted to Lieutenant[3] and Captain in 1958.[4] Ferguson retired in 1968 and was “granted the honorary rank of Major”.[5] During his career he served with the regiment in Germany, Egypt, Aden, and Cyprus.

    Ferguson’s first wife was Susan Wright. They married in St Margaret’s Church, Westminster on 17 January 1956. They had two daughters: Jane Louisa, born on 26 August 1957, and Sarah Margaret, later the Duchess of York, born on 15 October 1959. They divorced in 1974. During their marriage the Fergusons were recognised society figures. The Major retired from his army career and his family moved to Dummer Down Farm which he inherited upon his father’s death. It left him also more time to devote to polo, another of his passions. His interest in polo frequently brought him into contact with the Royal Family, and it was through this connection that his daughter, Sarah, met Prince Andrew.

    In 1975, Ferguson married for the second time to Susan Deptford. They had three children, Andrew (b. 1978), Alice (b. 1980), and Eliza Charlotte (b. 1985, Basingstoke).[6]

    In 1987, Ferguson was entered as an officer (brother) in the Venerable Order of Saint John.[7]

    In 1988, while his daughter Sarah was married to The Duke of York, the News of the World printed a story about Ferguson’s membership of the Wigmore Club, “a health club and massage parlour in London staffed by girls who, dressed in starched white ‘medical’ gowns, allegedly offered à la carte sexual services to members.”[8] He maintained that he had used the club “for massage only… and by that I mean a totally straight one” and as “a kind of cocoon where I could shut myself away for an hour and think”.[8] The controversy did not affect his marriage, however it led him to leave his post as The Prince of Wales’ polo manager and his position at the Guards Polo Club. His rare media appearances were to defend his daughter Sarah and raise awareness of prostate cancer. In 1994 he published his autobiography, The Galloping Major: My Life in Singular Times.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Susan_Barrantes

    Susan Mary Barrantes (née Wright, previously Ferguson; 9 June 1937 – 19 September 1998) was the mother of Sarah, Duchess of York, and the maternal grandmother of Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie of York.

    She was known as ‘the bolter’, following her elopement with an Argentinian polo-player, causing a stir in social circles. After his death, she became a film-producer in Buenos Aires, but was tragically killed in a road accident.

    She was born Susan Mary Wright in Bramcote, Nottinghamshire, the daughter of FitzHerbert Wright and the Honourable Doreen Wingfield. The Wrights can be traced back at least to John Wright alias Camplyon of Stowmarket who made his will in 1557, although wills and deeds show the family holding land in Suffolk and Norfolk at least a century earlier. His son, John Wright, a captain in Colonel Whalley’s Regiment of Horse, was imprisoned in Newark Castle for his attachment to the Parliamentary cause, but later acquired estates in Nottinghamshire and Suffolk. Captain Wright’s grandson, Ichabod, was a banker who owned estates in Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire, and established Wright’s Bank with two of his sons. His great-grandson, Samuel Wright of Gunthorpe, married a daughter of Lord Coventry. Samuel’s brother John of Langar and Lenton Hall was a banker and principal proprietor of the Butterley Works. His granddaughter became the wife of the Earl of Buckinghamshire. John Wright’s son, Francis, married Selina, daughter of Sir Henry FitzHerbert, 3rd Baronet of Tissington Hall, Derbyshire and was a noted philanthropist; he was Susan’s great great grandfather. Susan’s maternal grandfather was Mervyn Wingfield, 8th Viscount Powerscourt.

    [edit] Early life and first marriageSusan was the youngest of four children, with two sisters, Brigid and Davina, and a brother, Bryan. Brigid married Julian Salmond, son of Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir John Salmond and the Hon. Monica Grenfell. Davina married firstly Sir Richard Boughey 10th Bt, and secondly Spencer Loch, 4th Baron Loch. Bryan was a Major in the Blues and Royals.

    Susan Wright completed school and for a short time attended secretarial college. During the debutante season of 1954, she was presented to the Queen.[citation needed]

    On 17 January 1956, Susan married Lieutenant Ronald Ferguson (1931–2003) at St Margaret’s, Westminster. He rose to the rank of Major, played polo with Prince Philip, and became Prince Charles’s Polo Manager. Ronald and Susan had two daughters: Jane Louisa, born on 26 August 1957, and Sarah Margaret, later the Duchess of York, born on 15 October 1959.

    [edit] Divorce and second marriageIn 1972, Susan caused a stir in society circles by leaving her family, to move to Argentina with professional polo-player Hector Barrantes, causing her to be dubbed ‘the bolter’. Her daughters were then raised by their father Ronald with the help of their extended family. Susan and Ronald divorced in 1974, and in 1975 she married Barrantes.[citation needed]

    Susan and her new husband moved to the ranch-manor “El Pucara” in Tres Lomas, Argentina. In her writings and filmographic work, she recorded that aside from the birth of her two daughters, her life in Argentina was the happiest time of her life personally and professionally, since she had the chance to explore and develop a great documentary film career. Her two passions, polo and film, were combined in a new profession. She also assisted her husband’s business of breeding polo ponies and cattle until his death from cancer in 1990.

    Widowhood brought financial difficulties for Susan Barrantes, and she once again decided to start afresh. Selling more than half the farm to the polo-playing Australian media magnate Kerry Packer, she relocated to a large flat in the Recoleta-Palermo borough of Buenos Aires. In that city, she set up a television production company, making films about horses.[citation needed] This last project became the dearest legacy of her professional life.

    ” Recoleta-Palermo Chico” borough, Buenos Aires.Susan remained firm friends with the Prince of Wales, who contributed a Foreword to her book titled POLO.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ronald_Ferguson

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_Ferguson

    Patrick Ferguson was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 25 May (Old Style)/4 June (New Style) 1744, the second son and fourth child of advocate James Ferguson of Pitfour (who was raised to the judges’ bench as a Senator of the College of Justice, so known as Lord Pitfour after 1764) and his wife Anne Murray, a sister of the literary patron Patrick Murray, 5th Lord Elibank.

    Through his parents, he knew a number of major figures in the Scottish Enlightenment, including philosopher and historian David Hume, on whose recommendation he read Samuel Richardson’s novel Clarissa when he was fifteen, and the dramatist John Home. He had numerous first cousins through his mother’s family: these included Sir William Pulteney, 5th Baronet, Commodore George Johnstone, and Sir James Murray (later Murray-Pulteney).

    Jump to: navigation, search
    Sir Henry Clinton

    Portrait attributed to Andrea Soldi, painted circa 1762–1765
    Born 16 April 1730
    Uncertain
    Died 23 December 1795 (aged 65)
    London
    Allegiance Great Britain
    Service/branch British Army
    Years of service 1751–1793
    Rank General
    Commands held Colonel, 12th Regiment of Foot
    Commander-in-Chief, North America
    Colonel, 7th (Queen’s Own) Regiment of Light Dragoons
    Battles/wars War of the Austrian Succession
    Seven Years’ War
    American War of Independence
    Awards Knight of the Bath
    Other work Member of Parliament
    Governor of Gibraltar (died before assuming office)
    General Sir Henry Clinton, KB (16 April 1730 – 23 December 1795) was a British army officer and politician, best known for his service as a general during the American War of Independence. First arriving in Boston in May 1775, from 1778 to 1782 he was the British Commander-in-Chief in North America. In addition to his military service, due to the influence of the 2nd Duke of Newcastle, he was a Member of Parliament for many years. Late in life he was named Governor of Gibraltar, but died before assuming the post.

    He came from a noble family that could trace its lineage to 1066 and had a long history of service to the Crown. The son of George Clinton, an admiral of the fleet, Henry had two sons who continued the family tradition of high command: General Sir William Henry Clinton (1769–1846), and Lieutenant-General Sir Henry Clinton (1771–1829).

    [edit] Seven Years’ WarFerguson began his military career in his teens, encouraged by his maternal uncle James Murray. He served briefly in the Holy Roman Empire with the Scots Greys during the Seven Years’ War, until a leg ailment – probably tuberculosis in the knee – forced him to return home. After recovering, now in peace-time, he served with his regiment on garrison duty. In 1768, he purchased a command of a company in 70th Regiment of Foot, under the Colonelcy of his cousin Alexander Johnstone, and served with them in the West Indies until his lame leg again began to trouble him.

    After returning home in 1772, he took part in light infantry training, coming to the attention of General Howe. During this time, he developed the Ferguson rifle, a breech-loading flintlock weapon based on Chaumette’s earlier system.

    [edit] American War of IndependenceIn 1777, Ferguson went to the colonies to serve in the American War of Independence with his experimental rifle corps. However, after initial success, he was shot through the right elbow joint at the Battle of Brandywine on 11 September 1777 in Pennsylvania. Shortly before, he had had the chance to shoot a prominent American officer, accompanied by another in distinctive hussar dress, but decided not to do so, as the man had his back to Ferguson him and was unaware of his presence. A surgeon told Ferguson in the hospital that some American casualties had said that General Washington had been in the area at the time. Ferguson wrote that, even if the officer were the general, he did not regret his decision. The officer’s identity remains uncertain; historians suggest that the aide in hussar dress might indicate the senior officer was Count Casimir Pulaski.

    For some months after being wounded, Ferguson was at risk for amputation of his arm. During this time, he received news of his father’s death. Ferguson eventually recovered, although his right arm was permanently crippled. He resumed his career in May 1778, under the command of Sir Henry Clinton.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casimir_Pulaski

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Clinton_(American_War_of_Independence)

    • Renee says:

      http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/cristinaodone/100040637/sarah-ferguson-and-the-news-of-the-world-thats-the-last-of-her-nine-lives/

      The News of the World seems to have recorded Sarah Ferguson promising access to Prince Andrew, as a UK trade envoy, for £500,000. If true – and even a Government minister this morning condemned her apparently “shoddy and grubby” behaviour – this really is the end for Fergie’s claim to respectability.

      It makes me sad. The Duchess, I know, was always over the top, a loud lively lass with a twinkle in her eye and an appalling taste in everything from men to clothes. But she was, undoubtedly, fun. She brought Diana down to earth, clowning about for the paparazzi at Klosters. She giggled at Buckingham Palace and showed too much leg at Clarendon House. Around her, Andrew beamed, Charles looked priggish, and the Queen looked like she was, for once, having a good time.

      And when she fell, she fell so spectacularly, you kind of warmed to her. She was caught sucking a man’s toes. They were not Prince Andrew’s, and all hell broke loose. Fergie was banished from Royal circles, and even though she and her ex-husband stayed in touch, she was a pariah. This allowed her to date a long list of increasingly unappetising (but always wealthy) characters, which of course kept the tabloids buzzing around “the Duchess”. Her exploits grew more and more like a hysterical hen party that never led to marriage. Or, in her, case re-marriage.

      But nothing could keep her down. She made good money as an ambassadress for Weight Watchers, she wrote a children’s book, and she took America by storm, gracing every TV sofa from Oprah’s to Jay Leno, and every party from Manhattan to Miami.

      On this side of the Atlantic, they were less welcoming: they bitched about her going out on the town with her teenage daughters, and about her making a documentary about common people. Still, everyone had to admit, this Duchess bounced back. She seemed to have regained Prince Andrew’s love, and even the hard-hearted had to smile at the sight of the two ex-spouses chortling together over their daughters.

      Fergie, it seemed, was flawed, but human, and you couldn’t help wish her well. But now, the cat has used up all her lives. The accusation of selling access to her (unwitting and innocent) ex is ugly, greedy stuff, which won’t play well at the Palace, or in ordinary homes. Sarah Ferguson, the jolly Royal, is no more. The desperate Duchess has taken her place, and she’s not a pretty sight.

      http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2203474/Just-like-Kate-Middleton-Fergie-toe-sucking-Texan-naked-Charles-target-French-magazines.html

      The British Royal Family is a favourite target of French celebrity magazines.
      Twenty years ago, at another private villa in the South of France, Sarah Ferguson found herself in the paparazzi viewfinder.
      Lying topless on a sun-lounger, she was photographed having her toes sucked by her Texan financial adviser, John Bryan.

  14. Renee says:

    http://thepeerage.com/p20439.htm

    Maya Van Dien Oxenberg1
    F, #204381, b. 20 September 2001

    Maya Van Dien Oxenberg|b. 20 Sep 2001|p20439.htm#i204381|Casper Van Dien||p20438.htm#i204380|Catherine Oxenberg|b. 22 Sep 1961|p822.htm#i8219|||||||Howard Oxenberg|b. 1919\nd. 25 Jun 2010|p11275.htm#i112745|Elizabeth Karageorgievich, Princess of Yugoslavia|b. 7 Apr 1936|p11275.htm#i112744|

    Last Edited=1 Dec 2006
    Maya Van Dien Oxenberg was born on 20 September 2001.2 She is the daughter of Casper Van Dien and Catherine Oxenberg.1
    Citations
    [S1710] Juan Carlos Marino y Montero, “re: Sapieha-Potocki Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 4 May 2006. Hereinafter cited as “re: Sapieha-Potocki Family.”
    [S2020] Samuel Dyck, “re: Catherine Oxenberg,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 1 December 2006. Hereinafter cited as “re: Catherine Oxenberg.”
    Celeste Alma Van Dien Oxenberg1
    F, #204382, b. 3 October 2003

    Celeste Alma Van Dien Oxenberg|b. 3 Oct 2003|p20439.htm#i204382|Casper Van Dien||p20438.htm#i204380|Catherine Oxenberg|b. 22 Sep 1961|p822.htm#i8219|||||||Howard Oxenberg|b. 1919\nd. 25 Jun 2010|p11275.htm#i112745|Elizabeth Karageorgievich, Princess of Yugoslavia|b. 7 Apr 1936|p11275.htm#i112744|

    Last Edited=1 Dec 2006
    Celeste Alma Van Dien Oxenberg was born on 3 October 2003.2 She is the daughter of Casper Van Dien and Catherine Oxenberg.1
    Citations
    [S1710] Juan Carlos Marino y Montero, “re: Sapieha-Potocki Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 4 May 2006. Hereinafter cited as “re: Sapieha-Potocki Family.”
    [S2020] Samuel Dyck, “re: Catherine Oxenberg,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 1 December 2006. Hereinafter cited as “re: Catherine Oxenberg.”
    Dr. Alberto Manuel Izura y Montesinos1
    M, #204383

    Dr. Alberto Manuel Izura y Montesinos||p20439.htm#i204383|Alberto Dionisio Izura y Lus|b. 1921|p45013.htm#i450121|Maria Rosa Montesinos Paulos||p45013.htm#i450122|Alberto de Izura y Armendariz|b. 9 Jul 1894|p45013.htm#i450124|Juana Lus||p45013.htm#i450130|||||||

    Last Edited=29 Aug 2006
    Dr. Alberto Manuel Izura y Montesinos was born at Buenos Aires, Argentina.1 He is the son of Alberto Dionisio Izura y Lus and Maria Rosa Montesinos Paulos.1 He married Irma Paulina Depietri Barreda.
    He graduated with a Doctor in Law.1 He was an antique dealer.1
    Child of Dr. Alberto Manuel Izura y Montesinos and Irma Paulina Depietri Barreda
    Alberto Hilario de Izura+1
    Citations
    [S1710] Juan Carlos Marino y Montero, “re: Sapieha-Potocki Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 4 May 2006. Hereinafter cited as “re: Sapieha-Potocki Family.”
    Martin Barrantes Figueroa1
    M, #204384, b. 29 July 1910, d. 14 October 1976

    Martin Barrantes Figueroa|b. 29 Jul 1910\nd. 14 Oct 1976|p20439.htm#i204384|Martin Barrantes Torino||p20439.htm#i204386|Maria Raquel Figueroa Arias||p20439.htm#i204387|||||||||||||

    Last Edited=29 Aug 2006
    Martin Barrantes Figueroa was born on 29 July 1910 at Salta, Argentina.1 He was the son of Martin Barrantes Torino and Maria Raquel Figueroa Arias.1 He died on 14 October 1976 at age 66 at Buenos Aires, Argentina.1
    Child of Martin Barrantes Figueroa and Clelia Josefina Sansoni Pais
    Hector Eduardo Barrantes1 b. 1939, d. 10 Aug 1990
    Citations
    [S1710] Juan Carlos Marino y Montero, “re: Sapieha-Potocki Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 4 May 2006. Hereinafter cited as “re: Sapieha-Potocki Family.”
    Clelia Josefina Sansoni Pais1
    F, #204385

    Last Edited=29 Aug 2006
    Child of Clelia Josefina Sansoni Pais and Martin Barrantes Figueroa
    Hector Eduardo Barrantes1 b. 1939, d. 10 Aug 1990
    Citations
    [S1710] Juan Carlos Marino y Montero, “re: Sapieha-Potocki Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 4 May 2006. Hereinafter cited as “re: Sapieha-Potocki Family.”

    Martin Barrantes Torino1
    M, #204386

    Last Edited=29 Aug 2006
    Martin Barrantes Torino was born at Salta, Argentina.1 He married Maria Raquel Figueroa Arias.
    Child of Martin Barrantes Torino and Maria Raquel Figueroa Arias
    Martin Barrantes Figueroa+1 b. 29 Jul 1910, d. 14 Oct 1976
    Citations
    [S1710] Juan Carlos Marino y Montero, “re: Sapieha-Potocki Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 4 May 2006. Hereinafter cited as “re: Sapieha-Potocki Family.”
    Maria Raquel Figueroa Arias1
    F, #204387

    Last Edited=29 Aug 2006
    Maria Raquel Figueroa Arias was born at Salta, Argentina.1 She married Martin Barrantes Torino.
    Child of Maria Raquel Figueroa Arias and Martin Barrantes Torino
    Martin Barrantes Figueroa+1 b. 29 Jul 1910, d. 14 Oct 1976
    Citations
    [S1710] Juan Carlos Marino y Montero, “re: Sapieha-Potocki Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 4 May 2006. Hereinafter cited as “re: Sapieha-Potocki Family.”
    Isaias Padilla de la Puente1
    M, #204388, b. 1845, d. 1914

    Last Edited=29 Aug 2006
    Isaias Padilla de la Puente was born in 1845.1 He married Mercedes Avila Frias in 1870. He died in 1914.1
    Children of Isaias Padilla de la Puente and Mercedes Avila Frias
    Javier Padilla y Avila+1
    Rafaelo Padilla y Avila+1 b. 1887, d. 1945
    Citations
    [S1710] Juan Carlos Marino y Montero, “re: Sapieha-Potocki Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 4 May 2006. Hereinafter cited as “re: Sapieha-Potocki Family.”
    Mercedes Avila Frias1
    F, #204389

    Last Edited=29 Aug 2006
    Mercedes Avila Frias married Isaias Padilla de la Puente in 1870.
    Children of Mercedes Avila Frias and Isaias Padilla de la Puente
    Javier Padilla y Avila+1
    Rafaelo Padilla y Avila+1 b. 1887, d. 1945
    Citations
    [S1710] Juan Carlos Marino y Montero, “re: Sapieha-Potocki Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 4 May 2006. Hereinafter cited as “re: Sapieha-Potocki Family.”
    Andrew Hugh Ross MacLennan1
    M, #204390

    Last Edited=28 Aug 2006
    Andrew Hugh Ross MacLennan married Jane Anne McBride Howard, daughter of Richard Frederick Robert Howard and Jean McBride Taylor, in 1969.1 He and Jane Anne McBride Howard were divorced in 1984.1
    Children of Andrew Hugh Ross MacLennan and Jane Anne McBride Howard
    Morag Jean MacLennan2 b. 1970
    Angus MacLennan2 b. 1972
    Shannon Fiona MacLennan2 b. 1976

  15. Renee says:

    http://thepeerage.com/p822.htm#i8219

    Catesby Paget1
    M, #8211, b. 4 August 1868, d. 22 December 1930

    Catesby Paget|b. 4 Aug 1868\nd. 22 Dec 1930|p822.htm#i8211|Captain Catesby Paget|b. 29 Nov 1809\nd. 16 Jul 1878|p4970.htm#i49696|Emily Armit|d. 7 Jul 1924|p4971.htm#i49701|Hon. Berkeley T. Paget|b. 2 Jan 1780\nd. 26 Oct 1842|p2785.htm#i27850|Sophia A. Bucknall|b. b 1789\nd. 18 Feb 1859|p1031.htm#i10305|Richard Armit||p4971.htm#i49702||||

    Last Edited=13 Aug 2003
    Catesby Paget was born on 4 August 1868.1 He was the son of Captain Catesby Paget and Emily Armit.1 He died on 22 December 1930 at age 62.1
    Citations
    [S8] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volune 1, page 75. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition.
    Geoffrey Paget1
    M, #8212, b. 9 November 1869, d. 28 November 1932

    Geoffrey Paget|b. 9 Nov 1869\nd. 28 Nov 1932|p822.htm#i8212|Captain Catesby Paget|b. 29 Nov 1809\nd. 16 Jul 1878|p4970.htm#i49696|Emily Armit|d. 7 Jul 1924|p4971.htm#i49701|Hon. Berkeley T. Paget|b. 2 Jan 1780\nd. 26 Oct 1842|p2785.htm#i27850|Sophia A. Bucknall|b. b 1789\nd. 18 Feb 1859|p1031.htm#i10305|Richard Armit||p4971.htm#i49702||||

    Last Edited=13 Aug 2003
    Geoffrey Paget was born on 9 November 1869.1 He was the son of Captain Catesby Paget and Emily Armit.1 He died on 28 November 1932 at age 63, unmarried.1
    Citations
    [S8] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volune 1, page 75. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition.
    Mary Paget1
    F, #8213, b. 8 December 1863, d. 24 January 1939

    Mary Paget|b. 8 Dec 1863\nd. 24 Jan 1939|p822.htm#i8213|Captain Catesby Paget|b. 29 Nov 1809\nd. 16 Jul 1878|p4970.htm#i49696|Emily Armit|d. 7 Jul 1924|p4971.htm#i49701|Hon. Berkeley T. Paget|b. 2 Jan 1780\nd. 26 Oct 1842|p2785.htm#i27850|Sophia A. Bucknall|b. b 1789\nd. 18 Feb 1859|p1031.htm#i10305|Richard Armit||p4971.htm#i49702||||

    Last Edited=13 Aug 2003
    Mary Paget was born on 8 December 1863.1 She was the daughter of Captain Catesby Paget and Emily Armit.1 She died on 24 January 1939 at age 75, unmarried.1
    Citations
    [S8] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volune 1, page 75. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition.
    Cherry Paget1
    F, #8214, d. 9 May 1941

    Cherry Paget|d. 9 May 1941|p822.htm#i8214|Captain Catesby Paget|b. 29 Nov 1809\nd. 16 Jul 1878|p4970.htm#i49696|Emily Armit|d. 7 Jul 1924|p4971.htm#i49701|Hon. Berkeley T. Paget|b. 2 Jan 1780\nd. 26 Oct 1842|p2785.htm#i27850|Sophia A. Bucknall|b. b 1789\nd. 18 Feb 1859|p1031.htm#i10305|Richard Armit||p4971.htm#i49702||||

    Last Edited=13 Aug 2003
    Cherry Paget was the daughter of Captain Catesby Paget and Emily Armit.1 She died on 9 May 1941, unmarried.1
    Citations
    [S8] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volune 1, page 75. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition.
    Beatrix de Maine
    F, #8215

    Beatrix de Maine||p822.htm#i8215|Helias II d’Anjou, Comte de Maine|d. 15 Jan 1151|p10475.htm#i104750|Philippa du Perche||p10466.htm#i104660|Fulk V. d’Anjou, 9th Comte d’Anjou|b. c 1092\nd. 13 Nov 1144|p10250.htm#i102497|Aremburga de la Fleche, Comtesse de Maine|d. c 1126|p10475.htm#i104743|Rotrou II ‘the Great’ du Perche, Comte du Perche|d. bt 20 Jan 1144 – 23 Apr 1144|p10466.htm#i104659|Matilda (?)|b. c 1090\nd. 25 Nov 1120|p10466.htm#i104658|

    Last Edited=10 May 2003
    Consanguinity Index=0.03%
    Beatrix de Maine is the daughter of Helias II d’Anjou, Comte de Maine and Philippa du Perche.
    Children of Beatrix de Maine and Jean III de Ponthieu, Comte d’Alençon
    Robert II d’Alençon, Comte d’Alençon d. 1217
    Guillaume d’Alençon d. 1203
    Alix d’Alençon d. 1220
    Helie d’Alençon d. a May 1233
    Philippe d’Alençon d. c 1223
    Jean II d’Alençon, Comte d’Alençon b. b 1190, d. 1191

    Jean III de Ponthieu, Comte d’Alençon
    M, #8216, d. 24 February 1191

    Last Edited=7 Feb 2003
    Jean III de Ponthieu, Comte d’Alençon died on 24 February 1191.
    He was also known as Jean I de. He gained the title of Comte d’Alençon.
    Children of Jean III de Ponthieu, Comte d’Alençon and Beatrix de Maine
    Robert II d’Alençon, Comte d’Alençon d. 1217
    Guillaume d’Alençon d. 1203
    Alix d’Alençon d. 1220
    Helie d’Alençon d. a May 1233
    Philippe d’Alençon d. c 1223
    Jean II d’Alençon, Comte d’Alençon b. b 1190, d. 1191
    Charlotte Fanning Stewart1
    F, #8217, d. 9 November 1904

    Charlotte Fanning Stewart|d. 9 Nov 1904|p822.htm#i8217|William Stewart||p4281.htm#i42809||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=3 Jul 2008
    Charlotte Fanning Stewart was the daughter of William Stewart.1 She married Sir James Henry Ramsay, 10th Bt. on 20 August 1873. She died on 9 November 1904.
    Her married name became Ramsay.
    Child of Charlotte Fanning Stewart and Sir James Henry Ramsay, 10th Bt.
    Katharine Marjory Ramsay1 b. 6 Nov 1874, d. 21 Oct 1960
    Citations
    [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 323. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
    Sophia Paget1
    F, #8218, b. 15 January 1871, d. 30 December 1952

    Sophia Paget|b. 15 Jan 1871\nd. 30 Dec 1952|p822.htm#i8218|Captain Catesby Paget|b. 29 Nov 1809\nd. 16 Jul 1878|p4970.htm#i49696|Emily Armit|d. 7 Jul 1924|p4971.htm#i49701|Hon. Berkeley T. Paget|b. 2 Jan 1780\nd. 26 Oct 1842|p2785.htm#i27850|Sophia A. Bucknall|b. b 1789\nd. 18 Feb 1859|p1031.htm#i10305|Richard Armit||p4971.htm#i49702||||

    Last Edited=3 May 2010
    Sophia Paget was born on 15 January 1871.1 She was the daughter of Captain Catesby Paget and Emily Armit.1 She married Sir Ernest Musgrave Harvey, 1st Bt., son of Reverend Charles Musgrave Harvey and Frances Harriet Brewster, on 9 April 1896.1 She died on 30 December 1952 at age 81.1
    From 9 April 1896, her married name became Hervey.1
    Children of Sophia Paget and Sir Ernest Musgrave Harvey, 1st Bt.
    Joan Musgrave Harvey2 d. 20 Dec 1949
    Sir Richard Musgrave Harvey, 2nd Bt.+2 b. 1 Dec 1898, d. 1 Sep 1978
    Ruth Musgrave Harvey+2 b. 1902
    Eleanor Paget Musgrave Harvey+2 b. 1905
    Citations
    [S8] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volune 1, page 75. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003). Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Catherine Oxenberg1
    F, #8219, b. 22 September 1961

    Catherine Oxenberg|b. 22 Sep 1961|p822.htm#i8219|Howard Oxenberg|b. 1919\nd. 25 Jun 2010|p11275.htm#i112745|Elizabeth Karageorgievich, Princess of Yugoslavia|b. 7 Apr 1936|p11275.htm#i112744|||||||Paul Karageorgievich, Prince of Yugoslavia|b. 15 Apr 1893\nd. 14 Sep 1976|p10361.htm#i103603|Olga zu Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, Princess of Greece and Denmark|b. 11 Jun 1903\nd. 16 Oct 1997|p10361.htm#i103602|

    Last Edited=1 Dec 2006
    Catherine Oxenberg was born on 22 September 1961 at New York City, New York, U.S.A.. She is the daughter of Howard Oxenberg and Elizabeth Karageorgievich, Princess of Yugoslavia. She married, firstly, Robert Evans on 12 July 1998 at Beverley Hills, California, U.S.A..1,2 She married, secondly, Casper Van Dien on 8 May 1999 at Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S.A..1,2
    She was an actress. Catherine Oxenberg also went by the nick-name of ‘Princess of Yugoslavia’. Her marriage to Robert Evans was annulled on 21 July 1998.2
    Child of Catherine Oxenberg
    India Riven Oxenberg b. 7 Jun 1991
    Children of Catherine Oxenberg and Casper Van Dien
    Maya Van Dien Oxenberg1 b. 20 Sep 2001
    Celeste Alma Van Dien Oxenberg1 b. 3 Oct 2003
    Citations
    [S1710] Juan Carlos Marino y Montero, “re: Sapieha-Potocki Family,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 4 May 2006. Hereinafter cited as “re: Sapieha-Potocki Family.”
    [S2020] Samuel Dyck, “re: Catherine Oxenberg,” e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 1 December 2006. Hereinafter cited as “re: Catherine Oxenberg.”
    Sir Ernest Musgrave Harvey, 1st Bt.1
    M, #8220, b. 27 July 1867, d. 17 December 1955

    Sir Ernest Musgrave Harvey, 1st Bt.|b. 27 Jul 1867\nd. 17 Dec 1955|p822.htm#i8220|Reverend Charles Musgrave Harvey|b. 11 May 1837\nd. 2 Nov 1917|p43273.htm#i432725|Frances Harriet Brewster|d. 10 Feb 1917|p43273.htm#i432727|Reverend Richard Harvey|d. 27 Jun 1889|p43273.htm#i432724||||James Brewster||p43273.htm#i432726||||

    Last Edited=23 Dec 2011
    Sir Ernest Musgrave Harvey, 1st Bt. was born on 27 July 1867.3 He was the son of Reverend Charles Musgrave Harvey and Frances Harriet Brewster.2 He married Sophia Paget, daughter of Captain Catesby Paget and Emily Armit, on 9 April 1896.1 He died on 17 December 1955 at age 88.3
    He was Director and Deputy-Governor of the Bank of England.3 He held the office of Lieutenant of the City of London.3 He was decorated with the award of the Chevalier, Legion of Honour.3 He was invested as a Fellow, Royal Empire Society.3 He was invested as a Commander, Order of the British Empire (C.B.E.) in 1917.3 He was decorated with the award of the Order of Leopold of Belgium.3 He was invested as a Knight Commander, Order of the British Empire (K.B.E.) in 1920.3 He was created 1st Baronet Harvey, of Threadneedle Street, City of London [U.K.] on 19 January 1933.3
    Children of Sir Ernest Musgrave Harvey, 1st Bt. and Sophia Paget
    Joan Musgrave Harvey2 d. 20 Dec 1949
    Sir Richard Musgrave Harvey, 2nd Bt.+2 b. 1 Dec 1898, d. 1 Sep 1978
    Ruth Musgrave Harvey+2 b. 1902
    Eleanor Paget Musgrave Harvey+2 b. 1905

  16. Renee says:

    Page/ Paget/ Middleton/ Arthur/Young

    Arthur M. Young – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Arthur Middleton Young (November 3, 1905 – May 30, 1995) was an American inventor, helicopter pioneer, cosmologist, philosopher, astrologer and author. Young was the designer of Bell Helicopter’s first helicopter, the Model 30, and inventor of the stabilizer bar used on many of Bell’s early helicopter designs. He founded the “Institute for the Study of Consciousness” in Berkeley in 1972. Young advocated a process theory, which is a form of integral theory. These theories attempt to integrate the realm of human thought and experience with the realm of science so that the concept of universe is not limited to that which can be physically measured. Young’s theory embraces evolution and the concept of the great chain of being. He has influenced such thinkers as Stanislav Grof and Laban Coblentz.

  17. Renee says:

    Arthur Middleton Young
    Born 3 November 1905 (1905-11-03)
    Paris, France
    Died 30 May 1995 (1995-05-31)
    Berkeley, California
    Spouse(s) Priscilla Page
    Ruth Forbes

    http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/JFKpaine.htm

    Ruth Paine was born in 1932. She was educated at Swarthmore College. A committed Quaker, she was an active member of the American Civil Liberties Union.

    Ruth married and settled in Irving, Texas. Her husband, Michael Paine, found employment as a research engineer with the Bell Helicopter Company, whereas Ruth was employed as a part-time teacher of the Russian language at St. Marks School in Dallas.

    In 1963 Michael Paine left the family home. According to the author Jim Bishop (The Day Kennedy Was Shot), it was a “friendly estrangement”. Ruth continued to live in Irving and at a party in February, 1963 she was introduced to Marina Oswald and Lee Harvey Oswald by George De Mohrenschildt. On 24th April, 1963, Marina and her daughter went to live with Ruth Paine. Lee Harvey Oswald rented a room in Dallas but stored some of his possessions in Ruth Paine’s garage. Ruth also helped Oswald to get a job at the Texas School Book Depository.

    On 31st October, 1963, an FBI agent, James Hosty visited Paine’s home to discover where Oswald was living. He spoke to both Paine and Marina Oswald about Lee Harvey Oswald. When Oswald heard about the visit he went to the FBI office in Dallas. When told that Hosty was at lunch Oswald left him a message in an envelope.

    The contents of the envelope has remained a mystery. A receptionist working at the Dallas office claimed it included a threat to “blow up the FBI and the Dallas Police Department if you don’t stop bothering my wife.” Hosty later claimed it said: “If you have anything you want to learn about me, come talk to me directly. If you don’t cease bothering my wife, I will take appropriate action and report this to the proper authorities.”

    According to fellow worker, Dave Noel, Michael Paine discussed the “character of assassins” a few hours before President John F. Kennedy was killed. He also returned to his home in Irving at 3.00 p.m. to find Dallas police officers searching the premises. He told the police: “As soon as I found out about it, I hurried over to see if I could help.”

    Anthony Summers reported in his book, The Kennedy Conspiracy that Michael Paine was overheard talking to his wife on the phone. He said that he was sure that Lee Harvey Oswald had killed John F. Kennedy. He added: “We both know who is responsible.”

    Buddy Walthers took part in the search of the home of Ruth Paine. Walthers told Eric Tagg that they “found six or seven metal filing cabinets full of letters, maps, records and index cards with names of pro-Castro sympathizers.” James DiEugenio has argued that this “cinches the case that the Paines were domestic surveillance agents in the Cold War against communism.”

    Ruth Paine was a key witnesses for the Warren Commission and provided detailed information on the activities of Marina Oswald and Lee Harvey Oswaldbefore the assassination. Jim Garrison later suggested that Ruth Paine might have been involved in setting Oswald up as the “patsy”. Garrison points out that Paine’s father ” had been employed by the Agency for International Development, regarded by many as a source of cover for the C.I.A. Her brother-in-law was employed by the same agency in the Washington, D.C. area.” He also claims that he had tried to “examine the income tax returns of Ruth and Michael Paine, but I was told that they had been classified as secret…. What was so special about this particular family that made the federal government so protective of it?”

  18. Renee says:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Howard_Hughes

    Howard Robard Hughes, Jr. (December 24, 1905[2] – April 5, 1976) was an American business magnate, investor, aviator, aerospace engineer, film maker and philanthropist. He was one of the wealthiest people in the world. As a maverick film producer, Hughes gained prominence in Hollywood from the late 1920s, making big-budget and often controversial films like The Racket (1928), Hell’s Angels (1930), Scarface (1932) and The Outlaw (1943). Hughes was one of the most influential aviators in history: he set multiple world air speed records, built the Hughes H-1 Racer and H-4 “Hercules” (better known to history as the “Spruce Goose” aircraft), and acquired and expanded Trans World Airlines, which would later on merge with American Airlines. Hughes is also remembered for his eccentric behavior and reclusive lifestyle in later life, caused in part by a worsening obsessive–compulsive disorder and chronic pain. His legacy is maintained through the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

    http://thesandymonocle.wordpress.com/2012/12/30/camilot-and-rocking-robins/

  19. Renee says:

    From the Smith, Picard, Hughes, dit la Fortune ( Fontaine), Perrot ( Parrot) Ross, Black (Swartz) family line. aka Princess Fadilla of Egypt* NOTE*

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominique-France_Picard

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